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+ - College Majors and the Jobs They Lead To->

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "Late last week, the U.S. Census Bureau posted an excellent interactive infographic that connects college majors with the occupations people with those majors end up in--and vice versa. For example, it shows--to no one's surprise--that people with majors in computers, mathematics, and statistics end up working as computer workers about half the time, with significant numbers going on to work in math and statistics (and a few in other science fields). More surprising is that nearly half end up doing work unrelated to science, tech, engineering, etc. It works the other way, too; by mousing over the "computer worker" category you see that the largest chunk of computer workers come from computer, math, and statistics majors, with another large chunk coming from engineering. But significant numbers also come from several other majors.

Some of the insights are startling. Only about a fifth (to perhaps a fourth) of physical science majors end up working in any scientific or technical field, and fewer than 10% of physical science majors work in the physical sciences. And only about an eighth of all graduates in the broad category of biological, agricultural, and environmental scientists end up working in fields related to science, engineering, and technology."

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+ - What's Your College Degree Worth?->

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "A recent study by economist Douglas Webber calculates the lifetime earnings premium of college degrees in various broad areas, accounting for selection bias--that is, for the fact that people who already are likely to do well are also more likely to go to college. These premiums are not small. Science Careers got exclusive access to major-specific data, and published an article that tells how much more you can expect to earn because you got that college degree--for engineering, physics, computer science, chemistry, and biology majors."
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+ - Best Alternative Client for Outlook/M$ Cloud Mail 2

Submitted by James-NSC
James-NSC (1414763) writes "My company is switching from onprem mail to a hosted "Exchange Online". This requires Outlook 2013, however, O13 is a *really bad* mail client — particularly in it's search function. Worst case I'll use two clients, one for actually interacting with my email and Outlook to interact with it's services, but it would be super handy if there was a good client that also supports all of the various added "functionality" bundled with Outlook. As I'm sure I'm not the first to be subjected to the "everything is better, because Cloud!" line of IT executive reasoning, what have my fellow /.'rs used as a mailer in this setup?"

+ - A New Book Debunks the STEM-Shortage Myth->

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "In an authoritative new book, Michael Teitelbaum takes on the current and recurrent myths of science/tech worker shortages, concluding that "the alarms about widespread shortages or shortfalls in the number of U.S. scientists and engineers are quite inconsistent with nearly all available evidence;" that "similar claims of the past were politically successful but resulted in a series of booms and busts that did harm to the U.S. science and engineering enterprise and made careers in these fields increasingly unattractive;" and that "the clear signs of malaise in the U.S. science and engineering workforce are structural in origin and cannot be cured simply by providing additional funding.""
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+ - More on the Disposable Tech Worker-> 1

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "At a press conference this week, in response to a question by a Science Careers reporter, Scott Corley, the Executive Director of immigration-reform group Compete America, argued that retraining workers doesn't make sense for IT companies. For the company, he argued, H-1B guest workers are a much better choice. "It's not easy to retrain people," Corley said. "The further you get away from your education the less knowledge you have of the new technologies, and technology is always moving forward.""
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+ - "STEM Shortage" Debate Reveals Fundamental Disagreements, Some Common Ground->

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "Among the usual arguments over whether a shortage (or a glut) exists of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workers, some illuminating statements were made. Robert Atkinson, president of the Information Technology and Information Foundation (ITIF), seemed to imply that STEM-shortage claim is at least in part a rhetorical device aimed at encouraging U.S. educational reform. That's an angle I hadn't seen before. There is also a clear tendency on the part of the pro-shortage crowd to lump all fields together, whereas those who don't see a generalized shortage insist on distinguishing among fields."
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Comment: Not factual (Score 1) 153

Safety is about learning to do things with good technique. Surgeons learn good sterile technique--and many operations are improvisational. Precisely the same thing: If you know what you're doing, you can skillfully and safely handle the unexpected. The idea that safety in industry is about filling out forms is also false. Unfortunately it's a tale that many academic scientists repeatedly tell themselves, and it helps reinforce the (lazy) status quot. (I do not mean that people working in academic labs are lazy; as others have pointed out, they work too much. I'm saying that as a culture, academia is lazy about safety and messages like this reinforce that.) In industry, people learn good technique--just like the surgeon. They view safety considerations as a routine part of what they do. If you're a coder, I assume, you annotate your code, or structure it well. (Sorry, it's been decades since I did any significant coding, or had anything to do with it really.) In the lab you use good technique: sterility, controls, safety. It all fits together into the skill set that defines you as a professional and not some brilliant hack.

+ - NASA: Hubble telescope catches asteroid death->

Submitted by coondoggie
coondoggie (973519) writes "NASA said today that the Hubble Space Telescope snapped what the agency called a never-before-seen break-up of an asteroid in mid-space. The asteroid, designated P/2013 R3 has broken into as many as ten smaller pieces , each with a comet -like tail, that NASA says are drifting away from each other at a leisurely 1.5 kilometers per hour — slower than the speed of a strolling human."
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+ - Chemistry Students and Postdocs Take Safety Into Their Own Hands-> 1

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "It's a scandal: Academic science labs are generally far less safe than labs in industry; one estimate says that people working in academic labs are 11x more likely to die than their industrial counterparts. A group of grad students and postdocs in Minnesota decided to address the issue had-on. With encouragement and funding from DOW, and some leadership from their department chairs, they're in the process of totally remaking their departments' safety cultures."
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+ - The Postdoc: A Special Kind of Hell->

Submitted by Jim_Austin
Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "In a very funny column, Adam Ruben reviews the disadvantages and, well, the disadvantages of doing a postdoc, noting that "The term "postdoc" refers both to the position and to the person who occupies it. (In this sense, it's much like the term "bar mitzvah.") So you can be a postdoc, but you can also do a postdoc, which unfortunately isn't as sexual as it sounds.""
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+ - The Neuroscientist Who Discovered He Was a Psychopath

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Joseph Stromberg writes at the Smithsonian that one afternoon in October 2005, neuroscientist James Fallon was sifting through thousands of PET scans to find anatomical patterns in the brain that correlated with psychopathic tendencies in the real world. “Out of serendipity, I was also doing a study on Alzheimer’s and as part of that, had brain scans from me and everyone in my family right on my desk," writes Fallon. “I got to the bottom of the stack, and saw this scan that was obviously pathological." When he looked up the code, he was greeted by an unsettling revelation: the psychopathic brain pictured in the scan was his own. When he underwent a series of genetic tests, he got more bad news. “I had all these high-risk alleles for aggression, violence and low empathy,” he says, such as a variant of the MAO-A gene that has been linked with aggressive behavior. It wasn’t entirely a shock to Fallon, as he’d always been aware that he was someone especially motivated by power and manipulating others. Additionally, his family line included seven alleged murderers, including Lizzie Borden, infamously accused of killing her father and stepmother in 1892. Many of us would hide this discovery and never tell a soul, out of fear or embarrassment of being labeled a psychopath. Perhaps because boldness and disinhibition are noted psychopathic tendencies, Fallon has gone in the opposite direction, telling the world about his finding in a TED Talk, an NPR interview and now a new book published last month, The Psychopath Inside. “Since finding all this out and looking into it, I’ve made an effort to try to change my behavior,” says Fallon. “I’ve more consciously been doing things that are considered ‘the right thing to do,’ and thinking more about other people’s feelings.”"

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