Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Do Geeks actually watch this show? (Score 1) 106

by gfxguy (#47929523) Attached to: Interviews: David Saltzberg Answers Your Questions About The Big Bang Theory
I agree... people I talk to at work (decidedly NOT geeks; I'm the lone computer programmer) mostly don't like the show. They call it a show about smart people for dumb people. I guess, in a way, all sitcoms are for dumb people... smart people would be doing something better with their time, but I digress. IMO it's not a show "about" smart people, it's a show about social interactions among really quirky people. The science has very little to do with the show at all... it's an aside; a part of the setting, not the main point.

Comment: Re:Too Bad (Score 2) 106

by gfxguy (#47928895) Attached to: Interviews: David Saltzberg Answers Your Questions About The Big Bang Theory

Well... I think what makes a show interesting is the quirky personalities of the characters. If they were "normal," it would be a pretty boring show. On top of that, many of the other scientists they meet on the show, including other faculty (Kripke excepted), are "normal." The deans and school presidents have been "normal." The Leslie character is pretty normal, all things considered. They had episodes where outside scientists came to visit, and despite the voracious sexual appetite (Dr. Plimpton), and another "Dr. Underhill," who was a handsome, "adventurous" motorcycle riding "stud" that Penny fell for (although he ends up being a jerk), they were pretty "normal."

I often find myself watching all sorts of fiction getting frustrated how stupidly people act in given situations... but if they didn't, it would be pretty boring.

Comment: Re:This isn't scaremongering. (Score 1) 491

by gfxguy (#47926463) Attached to: Scotland's Independence Vote Could Shake Up Industry
I can't predict what would happen, but your last statement is what I've been looking for in all this mess... in the short term, things like this are almost always painful, there's a lot of readjusting to do, but it's what happens in the long term that matters. I would applaud Scotland's secession as long overdue and, yes, as an American, believe that freedom and independence are just as important (if not more) than financial security.

Comment: Re:The Microsoft Tax can buy you... (Score 4, Interesting) 249

by gfxguy (#47894835) Attached to: City of Turin To Switch From Windows To Linux and Save 6M Euros

I agree... even 5 or 6 years ago, my father was visiting and asked to use my computer to check some things online... he sat down, ran the browser (Firefox at the time, which looks like the Firefox he has installed on Windows); he had to print out some PDFs he'd created that had his travel documents (hotel reservations and stuff), plugged it in, the window opened, he double clicked - they opened, he printed. Later I asked what he thought about using Linux, he said he didn't realize it wasn't Windows.

Of course, that's a simple example - he didn't do anything complicated, just double-clicked the Firefox icon and everything else was the same user experience, double-clicked some PDFs and the UX was the same... but while there are of course differences, anyone that can use MS Office could probably figure out Open/LibreOffice with little effort for all but pathalogical special cases.

Comment: Re:... and back again. (Score 4, Informative) 249

by gfxguy (#47894791) Attached to: City of Turin To Switch From Windows To Linux and Save 6M Euros

Ubuntu user here... unless I'm installing something really odd (which, if you work for some municipality you probably shouldn't be doing on your work computer), software installation is just as easy - sometimes easier - than using Windows. The days of downloading something that won't install because of missing dependencies, so you download them and they won't install because of missing dependencies.... etc., etc., is long gone with pretty much every distribution.

Don't know how this will turn out, of course, they are all pretty much test cases, and I think some of them make these announcements just to get MS to make them really great deals, and I'm not saying it will definitely work... but when you whittle things down to what a company computer should have installed in it - office software, email clients, browsers, etc., then there's no fundamental reason why Linux shouldn't work (except that it's not MS... which is what most arguments seem to boil down to).

Comment: Re:For fitness? Really? (Score 1) 471

by gfxguy (#47876183) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

Since they both (Apple and the other fitness bands) require the phone to work, the answer is really yes, for all intents and purposes

By that line of reasoning, there's not much point in having a smartphone as you can get text messages on your vintage Nokia and check your email/facebook when you get home.

Uh... no... by my line of reasoning you already have to have your wristband and phone with you anyway, so it's not comparable at all.

Let your wife check messages/notifications in the rain while leaving her phone safely in her purse or pocket. Discretely check messages/notifications in a meeting without the rudeness of digging out her phone. Receive silent signals to turn left or right on a jog or bike ride from tactile feedback.

Granted, but what does that really have to do with fitness or overall capabilities? And why would someone pay hundreds of dollars of extras for being able to text in the rain instead of doing the smart thing and getting out of it? And are you saying your phone can't give you tactile feedback?

Comment: Re:For fitness? Really? (Score 1) 471

by gfxguy (#47874467) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?
Since they both (Apple and the other fitness bands) require the phone to work, the answer is really yes, for all intents and purposes (since she's got the phone anyway). My problem isn't that Apple is doing it - I'm sure they'll do a great job, but that the summary author claims that's the part that caught his attention, when it's all been available elsewhere - for android OR apple users - for quite some time.

Comment: Re:is it just me... (Score 1) 471

by gfxguy (#47872505) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

I thought it was useless when Samsung did it, and I still think it's useless now. The only interesting benefit is for fitness tracking, which can be done with a number of smaller, less obtrusive, cheaper bands already on the market that already sync to your android or iPhone.

On the other hand, my wife and kids saw the Samsung and were like "oooh... new shiny toy!" So... they got that going for them.... all they need is a bunch of idiots with disposable income.

Comment: For fitness? Really? (Score 3, Insightful) 471

by gfxguy (#47872445) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

Personally, my doubts about wanting one were put to rest when I learned of the health-related features. Smartwatches will be able to track your movements and pulse rate, calculate how many calories you burn, and coach you continuously to improve your fitness.

You mean like fitbit, polaris, and other brands have been doing for years now? I guess it's news when Apple does it.

My wife has a polaris band she can combine with an accurate chest strap heart rate monitor, they sync together via bluetooth and her phone to track progress.... all without needing some big clunky, ugly "watch," or the premium cost for Apple products.

The Tao doesn't take sides; it gives birth to both wins and losses. The Guru doesn't take sides; she welcomes both hackers and lusers.

Working...