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Comment: Re:Pagemaker over both Photoshop and Quark Xpress (Score 1) 437

by JhohannaVH (#28169361) Attached to: Ten Applications That Changed Computing
Except that I ran Pagemaker & Framemaker on a Sun workstation back in the day. *face palm* It was so long ago, I'll be damned if I can even remember what model - but it was *way* early 90s, 92/93. The experience garnered me what I needed to get a temp job doing graphics illustration on a Macintosh for the Air Force Academy - on a text book on rocketry. :D See, it *IS* rocket science!

Comment: Re:C= 8-bitters instead of the Amiga?! (Score 1) 397

by JhohannaVH (#27835481) Attached to: The Biggest Cults In Tech
I actually had to log in for the first time in 9 months to respond to this. True enough, all too true. I learned to program my OWN games on my Vic20 out of the back of Byte Magazine. And going head to head with the other kids on the playground who had to BUY software for their dad's TRS-80s. Only, my Vic20 was MINE.... not Daddy's - he had no inclination to anything but the bottle. Though I no longer belong to any such cults as so described, my first love will always be Commodores. Tandy's SUCK! :P :P :P I truly miss my Amiga like crazy....but it's long gone the way of the PDP-11. :(
Politics

The Return of the Fairness Doctrine? 732

Posted by kdawson
from the no-fair dept.
Slithe writes "Last week at the National Conference for Media Reform, Ohio congressman Dennis Kucinich (a long-shot candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination) stated that the Fairness Doctrine may be reinstated. Kucinich will be heading up a new House subcommittee that will focus on issues around the FCC. The Fairness Doctrine was an FCC regulation that required broadcast media to present controversial issues in an honest, equal, and balanced manner. The FCC repealed it in 1987 — Democrats at the time tried to forestall this move but were ultimately thwarted by a veto by President Ronald Reagan. Critics of the Fairness Doctrine have stated that it was only used to intimidate and silence political opposition. At the convention, Kucinich said, 'We know the media has become the servant of a very narrow corporate agenda. We are now in a position to move a progressive agenda to where it is visible.'" In the interest of fairness, here is a Republican, free-market perspective on the return of the Fairness Doctrine.
Enlightenment

+ - 1UP's Top 10 WTF moments of 2006

Submitted by MasterPoof
MasterPoof (876056) writes "From Scott Sharkey 1UP's Top 10 : "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, but mostly, it was the what the f***iest of times. Barely a day went by this year when something absoludicrous didn't assault us from our own news page. Given the relentless march of progressively more insane events and the dilated nature of internet time some of this stuff has already begun to fade from collective memory. But it happened, no matter how much the shriveled rational halves of our brains try to tell us that it didn't." Though must of you probably know what half of these already are, its still worth a read (or at the very least a cheap laugh)."
The Internet

+ - VirtualCity Launches Street Level Images in Canada

Submitted by
chris_toronto
chris_toronto writes "The Globe and Mail has an article, as well as the Montreal Gazette about VirtualCity, a website that has been capturing millions of street level photos tied to a map interface (ala A9.com style) throughout Toronto and Montreal. They've tied this together with a neat Ajax interface to explore these cities in detail. The images appear to be in Hi Def and I've seen one of the trucks on the road in Toronto, it looks like the torch has been passed on since A9 pulled BlockView off the market."
The Internet

+ - Inside MySpace.com

Submitted by lizzyben
lizzyben (986088) writes "Baseline is running a long piece about the inner workings of MySpace.com. The story chronicles how the social networking site has continuously upgraded its technology infrastructure — not entirely systematically — to accommodate more than 26 million accounts. It was a rocky road and there are still hiccups, several of which writer David F. Carr details here.

In many ways, the success of MySpace is counterintuitive. From the story: "MySpace.com's continued growth flies in the face of much of what Web experts have told us for years about how to succeed on the Internet. It's buggy, often responding to basic user requests with the dreaded "Unexpected Error" screen, and stocked with thousands of pages that violate all sorts of conventional Web design standards with their wild colors and confusing background images. And yet, it succeeds anyway.""
Movies

The First HD DVD Movie Hits BitTorrent 537

Posted by kdawson
from the nailing-jello-to-a-tree dept.
Ars Technica reports that the first HD DVD movie has made its way onto BitTorrent, showing that current DRM efforts to prevent illegal sharing of copyrighted content are still futile and fighting an uphill battle. From the article: "The pirates of the world have fired another salvo in their ongoing war with copy protection schemes with the first release of the first full-resolution rip of an HD DVD movie on BitTorrent. The movie, Serenity, was made available as a .EVO file and is playable on most DVD playback software packages such as PowerDVD. The file was encoded in MPEG-4 VC-1 and the resulting file size was a hefty 19.6 GB."
Security

+ - Web vulnerability disclosure

Submitted by Scott
Scott (666) writes "I'm submitting my own story on an important topic: Is it illegal to discover a vulnerability on a Web site? No one knows yet but Eric McCarty's pleading guilty to hacking USC's web site was "terrible and detrimental" to tech lawyer Jennifer Granick, who believes the law needs to be at least clarified, if not changed to protect those who find flaws in production Web sites as opposed to those who "exploit" production Web sites. Of course, the owners of sites often don't see the distinction between the two. Regardless of whether or not it's illegal to disclose Web vulnerabilities, it's certainly problematic, and perhaps a fool's errand. After all, have you seen how easy it is to find XSS flaws in Web sites? In fact, the Web is challenging the very definition of vulnerability and some researchers are scared. As one researcher in the story says: "I'm intimidated by the possible consequences to my career, bank account and sanity. I agree with [noted security researcher] H.D. Moore, as far as production websites are concerned: 'There is no way to report a vulnerability safely.'""
United States

Feds Check Credit Reports Without a Subpoena 290

Posted by kdawson
from the thanks-Patriot-Act dept.
An anonymous reader points out that, by using National Security Letters, the FBI and other agencies can legally pull your credit report. The letters have been used by the FBI (mostly) but in some cases by the CIA and Defense Department. From the article: "'These statutory tools may provide key leads for counterintelligence and counterterrorism investigations,' Whitman said. 'Because these are requests for information rather than court orders, a DOD request under the NSL statutes cannot be compelled absent court involvement.'" Recipients of the letters, banks and credit bureaus, usually hand over the requested information voluntarily. A posting at tothecenter.com quotes the Vice President on the use of the letters: "It's perfectly legitimate activity. There's nothing wrong or illegal with it. It doesn't violate people's civil rights... The Defense Department gets involved because we've got hundreds of bases inside the United States that are potential terrorist targets."

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