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Submission + - WalkCar Is A Portable Ride Just The Size Of A Laptop (monalisaofblogging.com)

An anonymous reader writes: We don’t need Lexus Hoverboard teasers anymore, because we will have something similar to that soon enough. More like a mechanical skateboard, WalkCar is equally effective like a Hoverboard that you can step on to travel from one block to another. It’s about the size of a thick laptop, like the old IBMs but still, it’s portable enough to be carried around in a backpack or a briefcase.

Manufactured by an inventor in Japan, WalkCar looks like a more practical portable ride. It’s made of aluminum and works on lithium batteries.

Kuniako Saito, the developer of this device has done masters in electric car motor controls engineering. His motivation behind WalkCar was a device portable enough to be carried around in our bags.

The device is powerful enough to carry a person on a steep hill. It also has a tendency to navigate through tight courses. Apart from a lot of practice that you require to balance on a tiny surface, its only other drawback is the loud sound while working.

WalkCar is priced at $800 dollars, which is something really cheaper than a $10000 Hoverboard. It’s going to be available for the public in 2016. The developer is also going to start Kickstarter funding soon.

Submission + - Is Cloud Dead? (netwrix.com)

flukywhizz writes: Not long ago, a question was asked on Spiceworks community, and actually got a lot of responses. This is definitely one of the hottest topics in the IT community these days, especially after the Snowden and NSA scandals.

In this article you’ll find out what the Spice Heads think about the current state of the Cloud, if they still use Cloud providers and are going to continue adopting the new Cloud Technologies.

Submission + - Report: State of Decay also "banned" in Australia (playerattack.com)

dotarray writes: Proving that it doesn't rain, it pours: We're hearing reports of another game Refused Classification in Australia. This time, it's Microsoft's Xbox Live Arcade offering State of Decay, which was famously delayed Down Under due to confusion with the Board.

Submission + - Chemotherapy Can Make Cancer Growth Worse (gizmocrazed.com) 1

Diggester writes: The common treatment for cancer this day and age is chemotherapy but it is a very aggressive remedy that is not always guaranteed to work, and some new studies show it may actually be hurting more than helping.
The new study show chemo causing healthy cells to make a protein called WNT16B, which essentially fuels the cancer cells to keep growing and resist future treatment. This is absolutely the opposite effect wanted by patients and doctors, but this new research doesn't mean chemo should be canceled altogether.


Submission + - New OpenGL version released (khronos.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The specification for OpenGL 4.3 has been released by the Kronos Group at the SIGGRAPH 2012 conference in Los Angeles. New functionality includes compute shaders, shader storage buffers, improved debug message output, memory security improvements, robustness improvements, texture parameter queries, and more.


United Kingdom

Submission + - Amazon Kindle Book Sales Surpass Print In UK (techweekeurope.co.uk)

twoheadedboy writes: "Book lovers are increasingly turning to e-books, and in the UK Amazon has announced it now sells more e-books than physical copies on Amazon.co.uk. Kindle books surpassed sales of hardbacks in the UK back in May 2011 at a rate of two to one and now they have leapfrogged the combined totals of both hardbacks and paperbacks. The same happened in the US not so long ago, largely thanks to the popularity of novels like EL James' Fifty Shades of Grey, which started out as an e-book before being released in paperback."

Submission + - Algorithmic Trading Glitch Costs Firm $440 Million (nytimes.com) 3

alstor writes: "Yesterday an update to Knight Capital Group's algorithmic trading software caused massive volume buys and sells, resulting in large price swings on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). As a result, the NYSE canceled some of the trades, but today the loss to Knight has been calculated at $440 million. Ignoring adjustments for inflation, this makes the cost of this glitch almost as much as the $475 million charge Intel took for the Pentium FDIV Bug, which might warrant adding this bug to the list of worst bugs. In light of this loss and the May 6, 2010 Flash Crash, perhaps investors will demand changes from firms using algorithmic trading, since the SEC is apparently too antiquated to do anything about it (PDF WARNING)."

Submission + - Is it time for an OpenGL revolution? (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "In a scary twist that reinforces Valve’s distaste for Windows 8, it turns out that the Source engine — the 3D engine that powers Half Life 2, Left 4 Dead, and Dota 2 — runs faster on Ubuntu 12.04 and OpenGL (315 fps) than Windows 7 and DirectX/Direct3D (270.6 fps); almost a 20% speed-up. These figures are remarkable, considering Valve has been refining the Source engine’s performance under Windows for almost 10 years, while the Valve Linux team has only been working on the Linux port of Source for a few months. Valve attributes the speed-up to the “underlying efficiency of the [Linux] kernel and OpenGL.” But here’s the best bit: Using these new OpenGL optimizations to the Source engine, the OpenGL version of L4D2 on Windows is now faster than the DirectX version (303.4 fps vs. 270.6 fps). If OpenGL is faster, and it has a comparable feature set, and hardware support is excellent... why is Direct3D still the de facto API? With Windows losing its gaming crown and smartphones (OpenGL ES!) gaining in popularity, is it time for an OpenGL revolution?"

Submission + - JavaScript Botnet Sheds Light on Criminal Activity (darkreading.com)

CowboyRobot writes: "Informatica64, a security research group, demonstrated the use of cached JavaScript to control computers connecting to a malicious proxy.
"The researchers found a variety of low-level criminals using their proxy server: fraudsters posing as British immigration officials offering work permits in hopes of stealing money and sensitive documents from their victims; a man pretending to be a pretty woman on a number of dating sites to con victims into sending money for a plane ticket; and another fraudster selling nonexistent Yorkshire Terriers.""


Submission + - Facebook Abstainers could be labeled Suspicious 2

bs0d3 writes: According to this article printed in tagesspiegel.de, not having a facebook account should be the first sign that you are a mass murderer. As examples they use Norwegian shooter Anders Breivik, who used myspace instead of facebook and the newer Aurora shooter who used adultfriendfinder instead of facebook. They already consider those with facebook accounts, who lack friends to be suspicious, but now they are suggesting that anyone who abstains from facebook altogether may be even more suspicious. While it is already established that sites like facebook and google+ are no good for political activists, abuse survivors, and people in the witness protection program; abuse survivors will have to take a back seat while more and more insane articles like this come out. This line of thinking could sure help facebook's stock value.

Submission + - Google didn't delete all Street View Wi-Fi data (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: "Google is in more trouble over the Street View Wi-Fi data slurping incident. Two years ago Google admitted it had collected snippets of personal data while sniffing for Wi-Fi connections. The UK's data watchdog, the ICO, didn't fine Google, but did demand it delete the collected data. Following the FCC's investigation, the ICO double-checked with Google that the data was deleted, receiving confirmation that it had. Except... it hadn't all been deleted, Google has now admitted. That breaches the deal between the ICO and Google, and the watchdog has said it's in talks with other regulators about what to do next."

Submission + - Two more men with HIV now virus-free (msn.com)

Diggester writes: Two men unlucky enough to get both HIV and cancer have been seemingly cleared of the virus, raising hope that science may yet find a way to cure for the infection that causes AIDS, 30 years into the epidemic.

The researchers are cautious in declaring the two men cured, but more than two years after receiving bone marrow transplants, HIV can't be detected anywhere in their bodies. These two new cases are reminiscent of the so-called "Berlin patient," the only person known to have been cured of infection from the human immunodeficiency virus.


Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Dealing with harassment and uncomfortable behavior 1

zwei2stein writes: My team of about 10 men (IT guys) is expecting new coleague: Female one. It is guaranteed, that there will be remarks, double entendres and inuendos with huge potential of getting worse. We already have woman in team which can somehow handle this (and deliver apropriate verbal slaps). How would you deal with this? We talked about some fun ways — anyone who will do this will have to wear embarassing tie, simple ways — instead of swear jar, having sexual innuendo jar and even fairly harsh punishments — people losing their bonuses for month or their extra vaccation days. I'd like to figure out solution that would be effective, not call much attention to itself and not abandoned quickly.
Open Source

Submission + - Next Generation Democracy, Courtesy of Open Source 1

An anonymous reader writes: Does this election year promise anything like democracy? Historically, the main impediments to real democracy have been technical: the inability to get people together and to properly organize voting and debate. With modern collaboration technologies, these impediments have evaporated. And yet we still vote for representatives to rule over us, very much like lords rule over their vassals. The deep corruption and increasing trend toward totalitarianism in the status quo has to give one pause. Sure, direct democracy may have some serious pitfalls, but how does it compare to a government run by corporations, bent on intruding into every aspect of our private lives? With a consensus-based governance system, most of the downsides of direct democracy evaporate. Some of the consensus governance software projects are approaching beta. Perhaps an election year is the perfect time for nerds to consider a better way.

"Everybody is talking about the weather but nobody does anything about it." -- Mark Twain