Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:I bet they're not. (Score 1) 40 40

The moment I read this I thought "there is no way this can last"

In a year's time, it definitely won't work. In a weeks time it might not even work.

If it isn't legally prohibited and forced to shut down... then the streaming companies will be forced to find another method of blocking it. It just leaves a chance of breaking it for everyone.

Comment Re:AMD takes care of its customers? (Score 1) 138 138

I really like this. I've always thought good of AMD as a company. I really wish they were a solid competitor to intel in the processor market... but they just don't have the efficiency. Maybe things will swing back towards them some day.

GPU market they seem to be hanging on barely. Nvidia is focusing heavily on efficiency and lower power consumption. AMD is competing by using a lot more power in their equivalent GPUs and by having their prices be a bit better.

It's not too late for a single CPU/GPU package to completely change the playing field.

Comment Re:Paul Ford (Score 2) 71 71

Go ahead, pick up a drone for ~100$ USD that can record stable HD video with a first person view.

Pretty much can guarantee any footage you'd find in that price range would be no more useful than aerial photos on google. I have shitty 100$ ultra micro helicopters and multi rotors. They are not easily controllable outside nor do they have any kind of video capabilities.

I have 1000$-2500$USD helicopters that could mount an HD camera and a first person view thing so that I could take 'useful' video. It would cost probably another 500$ at the minimum to get something usable... and the size of these things gets pretty massive.

Regulating this stuff so that hobbyists would be hassled would be like regulating knives because someone could stab someone with them. It serves no purpose.

Comment Re:Ignoring the stupidity of the FAA for a minute. (Score 2) 239 239

Yeah...

as someone who actually flies RC Helicopters... they're not toys. They can be dangerous. I fly things large enough that if an untrained person flew, they could quite literally kill someone with it.

Multi-rotors might not have the same amount of force as a larger sized rc helicopter but they can still inflict some serious damage if someone doesn't really know what they're doing with it. Nowadays all the multi-rotors are being sold with gps systems and 'rescue' modes to make it easier for someone to fly with. It's the type of person who will plunk down 1000-2000$+ on one of these things assuming they are toys and flying them over a crowd of kids to take some video... and suddenly the GPS dies and he loses control of it because he has no idea how to control it.

I can only hope that is the kind of situation the FAA is trying to avoid with the 'commercial' use of drones. They don't give a shit if you make a million dollars with it... they just want to make sure you take the proper precautions so that you don't crash into somebody and inflict some permanent harm.

If you want a toy, go buy an airhog. Those are toys.

Comment Re:Good news! (Score 1) 227 227

or I could watch a good movie.

The whole thing has ended up as a huge publicity stunt for Sony. The people who 'denied' it were the theater chains, sony just dropped it because they did. The theater chains are leeches and should have been put into the spotlight, instead sony will get a christmas bonus for a relatively mediocre comedy.

Comment DRTFA (Score 1) 60 60

Oh I couldn't possibly imagine any reason why amazon would want to break into the smartphone market at all. The Kindle Fire isn't overly successful with their own app store enabled and the google app store stripped out. They don't sell kindles at a loss so they can reap huge profits from their chunk of a digital content sale. No sir.

Come on.

Comment Re:Of course! And you never need more than 640K RA (Score 1) 373 373

Yeah, the early firmwares for the m4 series had some issues but it was nothing like the sandforce controller based drives at the time. Once they did that major firmware update that improved performance like 20% across the board it was more or less ironed out.

Now that i'm thinking of it though, I think there was an issue with the M4 drives where it would crash after 5000 hours of use... http://forum.crucial.com/t5/Solid-State-Drives-SSD/Crucial-M4-128-GB-Random-Freezes/td-p/95787

That was fixed with a firmware update well over a year ago now.

Comment Re:Of course! And you never need more than 640K RA (Score 1) 373 373

IMO go with crucial. Using a 256GB crucial M4 in my gaming laptop, have had a raid0 128gb crucial M4 setup in my gaming desktop for a couple of years now. Zero issues.

I had issues with a patriot torqx 64gb dropping sometimes before firmware updated several iterations. I have a corsair force 3 120GB that hasn't had too many problems. I have an adata SSD in an ultrabook without any issues. Most of them are pretty good. The samsung stuff is using TLC chips which wasn't super popular afaik before they came to the market with it. In the long run it may get more reliable and cheaper but for now there isn't any advantage to going with the TLC stuff.

My next SSD will be a crucial drive assuming they keep up with speed and reliability. Intel has always sacrificed the most speed and capacity, OCZ has always been the least reliable (granted, mostly due to controller woes that aren't all their fault, ultimately I blame them)

Comment Re:If new Xbox requires always on internet connect (Score 1) 261 261

I'd buy it because I pretty much just use it for online gaming. I will admit of the four or five people i've met who aren't into gaming heavily but still own an xbox 360, none of them have connected their xbox to the internet. They just want to play games on it like an atari, nintendo or playstation. They don't care about a new social UI, they don't care about DLC. They just wanted something they can have an hour or two diversion on - they don't live their lives gaming. Something simple that they don't have to think about.

I can see where the always-on side appeals to businesses though. If the xbox 360 required an internet connection to function - i'm sure they would have found out a way to hook it up. Xbox probably would have made money on them too once they realized there was a marketplace with movies, games and other distractions. If the original console had a wireless nic, i'm sure the people I know would have set it up since they all have a wireless network.

Comment Spread em' (Score 5, Insightful) 111 111

This seems directly equivalent to "If your front door is unlocked the police can come in and snoop around without a warrant"

You could say the same thing with several other things like...

"if your car is unlocked they can rummage through it legally without a warrant"

and

"If your fly is down, they can do a cavity search legally without a warrant"

Twitter

Twitter's New Transparency Report: Governments Still Want Your Data 30 30

Nerval's Lobster writes "All your Tweets are belong to us... with a court order. Twitter's second transparency report reinforces what many already know: governments want online user data, and to yank select content from the Internet. Twitter's first two transparency reports cover the entirety of 2012, so there's not a deep historical record to mine for insight. Nonetheless, that year's worth of data shows all types of government inquiry—information requests, removal requests, and copyright notices—either on the increase or holding relatively steady. Governments requested user information from Twitter some 1,009 times in the second half of 2012, up slightly from 849 requests in the first half of that year. Content-removal requests spiked from 6 in the first half of 2012 to 42 in the second. Meanwhile, copyright notices declined a bit, from 3378 in the first half of 2012 to 3268 in the second."

"Is it really you, Fuzz, or is it Memorex, or is it radiation sickness?" -- Sonic Disruptors comics

Working...