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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 22 declined, 4 accepted (26 total, 15.38% accepted)

+ - No fourth amendment rights for hackers, US District court rules

Submitted by Jeremy Erwin
Jeremy Erwin (2054) writes "Apparently, if you call yourself a hacker, you may lose fourth amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures

The court in Idaho decided that a software developer’s computer could be seized without him being notified primarily because his website stated: “We like hacking things and don’t want to stop.”

The developer, Corey Thuen, developed security software to protect industrial equipment against electronic attack. Thuen had hoped to open source some of his work, but his former employer, Batelle Corporation, claimed that Thuen's program Visdom, infringed on work he had done for Batelle's Sophia project.

What elevates the case from a run-of-the-mill intellectual property dispute is that Battelle persuaded the court to allow it to seize Thuen's computer to copy its files. The district court ruled that the programmer has the skills, as a "hacker", to release the contested code publicly, and destroy any evidence, if he knew a seizure was imminent: "The court has struggled over the issue of allowing the copying of the hard drive. This is a serious invasion of privacy and is certainly not a standard remedy... The tipping point for the court comes from evidence that the defendants – in their own words – are hackers. By labeling themselves this way, they have essentially announced that they have the necessary computer skills and intent to simultaneously release the code publicly and conceal their role in that act. And concealment likely involves the destruction of evidence on the hard drive of Thuen’s computer. For these reasons, the court finds this is one of the very rare cases that justifies seizure and copying of the hard drive." The plaintiff also obtained a temporary restraining order against Thuen and Southfork Security without a prior notice primarily because, again, the Southfork website declared “we like hacking things and we don’t want to stop"./auote?

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China

+ - New York Times: We've been hacked!->

Submitted by Jeremy Erwin
Jeremy Erwin (2054) writes "The New York Times reports that Chinese hackers have been exploiting its lack of network security for the last four months, apparently in response to a Times article highlighting the fact that the family of Wen Jiabao, the Chinese premier, have been accumulating a fortune worth billions of dollars trading on Wen's political influence."
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Games

+ - Why aren't there any civilians in military video g->

Submitted by Jeremy Erwin
Jeremy Erwin (2054) writes "A columnist for Slate asks why there aren't any civilians in todays's military shooting games.

Mostly, they don't want to face the consequences of players' bad behavior. In an interview with the website Rock Paper Shotgun, Battlefield 3's executive producer Patrick Bach explained that he doesn't "want to see videos on the Internet where people shoot civilians. That's something I will sanitize by removing that feature from the game." Bach believes that video games are serious business but that players' irreverence is holding back the form. "If you put the player in front of a choice where they can do good things or bad things, they will do bad things, go [to the] dark side because people think it's cool to be naughty, they won't be caught," he said.

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Microsoft

+ - Russia targets dissidents with anti-piracy raids->

Submitted by Jeremy Erwin
Jeremy Erwin (2054) writes "The Russian Government is using the pretext of software piracy to suppress dissident organizations, seizing computers and shutting down websites, regardless of whether the targeted groups actually use unlicensed software. Similar groups, allied with the government, remain immune to harassment. The New York Times article notes that Microsoft's behavior has not been completely above board."
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+ - Agriculture: Invented, so that we might have beer->

Submitted by Jeremy Erwin
Jeremy Erwin (2054) writes "Our Neolithic ancestors might have first experimented with agriculture in order to ensure a steady supply of alcoholic liquids according to a new book by Patrick McGovern, Uncorking the Past The Quest for Wine, Beer, and Other Alcoholic Beverages

"Archaeologists have long pondered the question of which came first, bread or beer. McGovern surmises that these prehistoric humans didn't initially have the ability to master the very complicated process of brewing beer. However, they were even more incapable of baking bread, for which wild grains are extremely unsuitable. They would have had first to separate the tiny grains from the chaff, with a yield hardly worth the great effort. If anything, the earliest bakers probably made nothing more than a barely palatable type of rough bread, containing the unwanted addition of the grain's many husks."

Calcium Oxalate is considered by most brewers to be an undesirable byproduct of alcohol production. Lacking a firm grasp of chemistry and filters, early brewers simply created special grooved beer crocks would allow the beer stone to precipitate out of solution into the grooves. 5500 years later, the deposits remained, providing archaeologists with evidence of beer production."

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