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Nintendo

+ - Wii surpasses 3 months of xbox sales in 3 weeks.

Submitted by
Whiney Mac Fanboy
Whiney Mac Fanboy writes "Nintendo's Wii has demolished Microsoft's xbox 360 sales in Australia, outselling the xbox's entire fourth quarter sales in just three weeks.

From the article:
The quarterly figures, released by games analyst Daniel Morse, show Nintendo sold 51,744 Wiis, whereas Microsoft sold 45,036 Xbox 360s. However, since the Wii only went on sale from December 8, its figures relate only to the three weeks to December 31, whereas the Xbox 360 numbers pertain to the entire three-month quarter.
"
Mozilla

+ - Flash Player now available for Linux

Submitted by Peite Anderson
Peite Anderson (666) writes "Adobe finally made Flash Player available for Linux with the latest version. Although the Flash Player itself is proprietary software, Adobe has made one significant component an open-source program, the ActionScript Virtual Machine that executes JavaScript programs on Web pages called Tamarin. Updated Linux debugger versions of Flash Player 9 (aka debug players or content debuggers) of Flash Player 9 are now available. Additionally, the Linux standalone player (projector) is available for developers who wish to publish projectors on Linux operating systems."
PlayStation (Games)

+ - The Dark Side of HDCP, or, Why Is My PS3 Blinking?

Submitted by FloatsomNJetsom
FloatsomNJetsom (1041770) writes "High Definition Content Protection is supposed to make sure you're not playing pirated content, but sometimes your devices screw up the HDCP "handshake" (over an HDMI cable) and nothing works. This happens with some regularity with the PS3, and Popular Mechanics investigated and found a quick and dirty workaround. From the article:
We then checked with Leslie Chard, president of HDMI Licensing, which owns the rights to the standard, who told us that HDCP is one component of HDMI that has been plagued with interoperability issues. HDCP (high-bandwidth digital content protection) is designed to prevent the interception of data — specifically copyrighted Hollywood movies — between an output component and a display. As Steve Balough, the president of Digital Content Protection, the licensing company for HDCP explains, the two pieces of hardware must exchange a "key," a sort of certificate of authenticity unique to each individual device, to verify a secure connection.
The problem isn't limited to the PS3 — many HDTV cable boxes and have the same problem. The fix there? Unplugging the power cable."

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