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Submission + - Is Whitelisting The Answer To The Rise In Data Breaches? (

MojoKid writes: It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that cyber criminals are quickly getting more sophisticated than current security, intrusion detection and prevention technology can defend against. And you have to wonder if the computer security industry as a whole is willing to take the disruptive measures required to address the issue head-on. One way to tackle the surging data breach epidemic is with a technology called “whitelisting.” It’s not going to sound too sexy to the average end user and frankly, even CIOs may find it unfashionable but in short, whitelisting is a method of locking-down a machine such that only trusted executables, DLLs and other necessary system and application components are allowed to run – everything else is denied. A few start-up security companies are beginning to appear in this space. The idea is to start with a known, clean system installation and then lock it down in that state so absolutely nothing can be changed. If you follow system security, regardless of your opinion on the concept of whitelisting, it’s pretty clear the traditional conventions of AV, anti-malware, intrusion detection and prevention are no longer working.

Submission + - Which Programming Language Should You Learn First? 3

An anonymous reader writes: If everybody should learn to code, what's the right tool for learning? asks Brian MacDonald "It seems like a simple question, and one that lots of aspiring developers ask themselves, but it’s actually somewhat loaded. Are you asking because you want to get a job as a developer? Because you want to get in on the mobile app craze? Because you’ve been tasked with improving your company’s web offerings, even though you’re not a developer? Or just out of personal interest, for the fun of it?"

Submission + - Artificial blood made in Romania ( 3

calinduca writes: Artificial blood that could one day be used in humans without side effects has been created by scientists in Romania. The blood contains water and salts along with a protein known as hemerythrin which is extracted from sea worms. Researchers from Babe-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, hope it could help end blood supply shortages and prevent infections through donations.

Submission + - Kepler-78b -- Earth's Hellish 'Twin Sister' -- Shouldn't Exist (

astroengine writes: Kepler-78b may be an exoplanet notable for being approximately Earth-sized and likely possessing a rocky surface plus iron core, but that’s where any similarity to our planet ends. It has an extremely tight orbit around sun-like star Kepler-78, completing one ‘year’ in only 8.5 hours. It orbits so close in fact that the alien world’s surface temperature soars to 2,000 degrees hotter than Earth’s. Referring to Kepler-78b as a “rocky” world is therefore a misnomer — it’s a hellish lava world. But this is just a side-show to the real conundrum behind Kepler-78b: It shouldn’t exist at all. “This planet is a complete mystery,” said astronomer David Latham of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in a press release. “We don’t know how it formed or how it got to where it is today. What we do know is that it’s not going to last forever.”

Submission + - Wikimedia To Move Its Servers To Ashburn, Virginia (

hydrofix writes: The Wikimedia Foundation is preparing for the transition its main technical operations to a new data center in Ashburn, Virginia, USA. This is intended to improve the technical performance and reliability of all Wikimedia sites, including Wikipedia. The current target windows for the migration are January 22nd, 23rd and 24th, 2013, from 17:00 to 01:00 UTC. Since 2004, Wikimedia sites have been hosted in the main data center in Tampa, Florida. In 2009, the Wikimedia Foundation’s Technical Operations team started to look for other locations with better network connectivity and more clement weather. Located in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, Ashburn offers faster and more reliable connectivity than Tampa, and usually fewer hurricanes.

Submission + - The technology to fake the NASA Apollo moon landings did not exist in 1969 ( 2

MarkWhittington writes: "The notion that the Apollo moon landings were faked is one of the more pernicious conspiracy theories, suggesting that the greatest technological feat in human history was done in a movie studio, probably by the late Stanley Kubrick. The theory has been debunked by everyone from the Mythbusters to actual photographic evidence.

Now a Jan 18, 2013 piece by Gizmodo, along with a video, proves once and for all and for all time that the Apollo moon landings really happened. The reason is that while the technology to send men to the moon certainly existed in 1969, the technology to fake video footage of them doing so did not exist."

Submission + - Laser used to shoot down drones ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Rheinmetall demos laser that can shoot down drones.

The German defence firm used the high-energy laser equipment to shoot fast-moving drones at a distance. The system, which uses two laser weapons, was also used to cut through a steel girder a kilometre away. The company plans to make the laser weapons system mobile and to integrate automatic cannon.

The 50kW laser weapons system used radar and optical systems to detect and track two incoming drones, the company said. The nose-diving drones were flying at 50 metres per second, and were shot down when they reached a programmed fire sector.


Submission + - Facebook Says Creating A Fake Profile Is Perjury (

jfruh writes: "Facebook has a problem with people creating fake profiles, sometimes claiming to be other (real) people that they know. They've come up with what may not be a particularly effective solution to the problem: making creators of suspicious profiles jump through some simple confirmation hoops, and then telling them that they'll commit perjury if they're lying. Is this even remotely legally binding?"

Submission + - Fukushima nuclear disaster 'man-made' (

AmiMoJo writes: "A Japanese parliamentary report into the Fukushima disaster states that it "could and should have been foreseen and prevented" and its effects "mitigated by a more effective human response". The panel concluded that the disaster "was the result of collusion between the government, the regulators and Tepco" founded in the failure of regulatory systems. Blame was also placed on a lack of investment in safety upgrades and a culture of not questioning authority.

Meanwhile the Ohi nuclear plant started generating electricity again. Opposition to the re-start had pointed out that the systemic failures that afflicted Fukushima had not been addressed, and are hoping that after the summer peak demand period is over the plant will be shut down or idled again."


Submission + - Atari turns 40 today (

harrymcc writes: "On June 27, 1972, a startup called Atari filed its papers of incorporation. A few months later, it released its first game, Pong. I celebrated the anniversary over at by chatting with the company's indomitable founder, Nolan Bushnell, who also started Chuck E. Cheese and more than 20 other companies--mostly unsuccessful, but often visionary--and hired and influenced Steve Jobs when he was an antisocial Reed College dropout."

Submission + - Leonardo da Vinci: How accurate were his anatomy drawings? (

antdude writes: "BBC News, with a 2.5 minutes embedded video, answers how accurate were Leonardo da Vinci's anatomy drawings — "During his lifetime, Leonardo made thousands of pages of notes and drawings on the human body.

He wanted to understand how the body was composed and how it worked. But at his death in 1519, his great treatise on the body was incomplete and his scientific papers were unpublished.

Based on what survives, clinical anatomists believe that Leonardo's anatomical work was hundreds of years ahead of its time, and in some respects it can still help us understand the body today.

So how do these drawings, sketched more than 500 years ago, compare to what digital imaging technology can tell us today? ..."

Seen on Neatorama."

Submission + - 11 years old on 11/11/11 and giving all to charity (

rolandw writes: Roo Slater, a school boy from Pennthorpe School, West Sussex, UK, has 11 minutes and 11 seconds past 11 on the 11th November 2000 recorded on his birth certificate as his date and time of birth. On 11/11/11 at 11:11:11, Roo will be exactly 11. As it is also Armistice Day, Roo has eschewed all presents and wants everyone to donate £11 to Help for Hero's. For those interested in numbers, co-incidences or just think that this is rather a cool thing for an eleven year old to do, Roo is hoping to raise £1,111.

Submission + - Google Street View Spreads to the Amazon. ( 4

FBeans writes: “Google has used a pedal-powered tricycle to start photographing the vast Amazon rainforest as part of its global Street View facility.”

“Although the pictures will only show a small slice of the gigantic forest, members of the Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS) which helped Google carry out the project, hope it will help spread environmental awareness.”

Now we can all go on rain-forest tours or travel down the Rio Negro river, “a boat with the tricycle on top took thousands of shots of the jungle and its residents.”

With Google spreading it’s street-view to businesses, geothermal mapping of the US and now the Amazon. Is there anything that Google won’t point a camera at? And what’s next?


Submission + - There Oughta Be a Standard: Laptop Power Supplies (

Esther Schindler writes: "Every mobile device you own has its own power supply and its own proprietary plug. There oughta be a better way, says Alfred Poor. Fortunately, he reports, the IEEE is coming to the rescue. "Their Universal Power Adapter for Mobile Devices (UPAMD) Working Group is developing a new standard that will not just address the needs of laptops and tablets, but will be intended to work with just about any electronics device that required between 10 and 240 watts of power," Poor writes. It's about darned time."

Submission + - Amazon to sell cheaper, ad-supported Kindle (

arcticstoat writes: Amazon has taken the wraps off a new, ad-supported version of its popular Kindle eBook reader, which is set to retail at $25 less than its non ad-supported cousin. The ads will only be displayed in a small band along the bottom of the home screen and on the screensaver page, and there are no current plans to implement in-book advertising.

The Kindle with "Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers'’ will go on sale from 3 May and is identical, hardware-wise, to the current WiFi-only version of the Kindle.

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken