Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Internet

+ - Scholarpedia: A Wiki-encyclopedia you can trust?

Submitted by
JasonFleischer
JasonFleischer writes "Scholarpedia is a Wiki that aims to fix the problem of author's credentials and article accuracy by using the academic peer-review system. Articles are written by experts (so far almost always the original innovator in the field) who are elected by the public. Articles are anonymously reviewed by other experts, and once accepted the author becomes the article's curator.

Articles are dynamic living documents. Anyone can submit revisions to an article, but the revisions are moderated by the curator. A curator can resign or be removed if they are not keeping up with edits. The person who has contributed the most edits to the article is then offered the curatorship.

Right now Scholarpedia concentrates on covering a few academic topics (Neuroscience, Mathematics, Computer Science) deeply rather than all things shallowly. Do you think this kind of hybrid Wiki will be able to expand into a general Wikipedia/Citizendium like knowledge base, and if so would you trust it more?"
Science

Neutrino Experiment Restores Standard Model Symmetry 83

Posted by kdawson
from the eightfold-way dept.
perturbed1 writes "A Fermilab press release announced that MiniBooNE's latest results have salvaged the Standard Model of particle physics. The experiment ruled out the simple neutrino oscillation interpretation of the 1990s LSND experiment. Neutrinos have a tiny amount of mass, required by their oscillations, as observed in solar, atmospheric, and reactor neutrino experiments. Combining this mass with the LSND experiment's results required the presence of a fourth but 'sterile' neutrino, breaking the 3-fold symmetry of particle families in the standard model." Nice to see some good news out of Fermilab after the CERN debacle.
The Internet

+ - Wales or Sanger? You decide.

Submitted by JasonFleischer
JasonFleischer (620495) writes "Scholarpedia is a Wiki that aims to fix the problem of author's credentials and article accuracy by using the peer-review system common to academia. Articles are written by experts in the field (typically the original inventors) who are elected by the public. Their articles are anonymously reviewed by other experts, and once accepted the author becomes the article's curator. Anyone can submit revisions to an article, but the revisions are moderated by the curator. Scholarpedia concentrates on covering a few topics (Neuroscience, Mathematics, Computer Science) deeply rather than all things shallowly. Currently, elections are being held for authorship of the article on Wikipedia itself (Who will win, Wales or Sanger?)"

One small step for man, one giant stumble for mankind.

Working...