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Comment: They Do Cool Stuff (Score 1) 117

My next door neighbor in Celebration just had hernia surgery at the Nicholson Center done using this technology, it's pretty amazing. Minimal invasivness and very efficent. It's nice to see Celebration getting good press for this type of thing.

Interestingly, residents in Celebration have access to the very best fiber connections, competitive to Google but from a smaller regional telecom. For $60/month residents get 1000/1000 internet. On the town message board, residents routinely post their Speedtests with tests in the high 900 Mbits.

+ - Drone Detection: What Works And What Doesn't

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Another drone was discovered flying in restricted air space around the White House two weeks ago. The Secret Service found the pilot simply because they happened to see him. In other words, there is no indication that the Secret Service would have found the pilot if he had not been in plain view. This person didn’t have bad intentions, but one day someone will. A little drone-detection education is in order.

+ - Neil deGrasse Tyson urges America to challenge China to a space race->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: According to a Tuesday story in the UK edition of the International Business Times, Neil degrease Tyson, the celebrity astrophysicist and media personality, advocated a space race between the United States and China. The idea is that such a race would spur innovation and cause industry to grow. The Apollo race to the moon caused a similar explosive period of scientific research and engineering development.
Link to Original Source

+ - IRS cut its cybersecurity staff by 11% over four years->

Submitted by dcblogs
dcblogs writes: The Internal Revenue Service, which disclosed this week the breach of 100,000 taxpayer accounts, has been steadily reducing the size of its internal cybersecurity staff as it increases its security spending. In 2011, the IRS employed 410 people in its cybersecurity organization, but by 2014 the headcount had fallen to 363 people. In 2012, the IRS earmarked $129 million for cybersecurity, which rose to $141.5 million last year, an increase of approximately 9.7%. This increase in spending, coupled with the reduction in headcount, is an indicator of outsourcing, said Alan Paller, director of research at the SANS Institute. Paller sees risks in that strategy. "Each organization moves at a different pace toward a point at which they have outsourced so much that the insiders do little more than manage contracts, and lose their technical expertise and ability to manage technical contractors effectively," he said.
Link to Original Source

+ - Google and Whatsapp will be forced to hand messages to MI5->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Google, Facebook and other internet giants will be forced to give British spies access to encrypted conversations of suspected terrorists and criminals under plans to bolster surveillance powers.

New laws will require Whatsapp, which is owned by Facebook, Snapchat and other popular apps to hand messages sent by their users to MI5, MI6 and GCHQ about suspects under investigation.

The new power is to be included in a new Investigatory Powers Bill which will overhaul the ability of the spy agencies to monitorsuspects and intercept their communications.

Link to Original Source

+ - Journalist fools media into publishing chocolate weight loss story->

Submitted by dinfinity
dinfinity writes: "“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. [...] It was discussed on television news shows. [...] My colleagues and I recruited actual human subjects in Germany. We ran an actual clinical trial, with subjects randomly assigned to different diet regimes. And the statistically significant benefits of chocolate that we reported are based on the actual data. It was, in fact, a fairly typical study for the field of diet research. Which is to say: It was terrible science. The results are meaningless, and the health claims that the media blasted out to millions of people around the world are utterly unfounded."
Link to Original Source

+ - Gene Testing Often Gets It Wrong 1

Submitted by BarbaraHudson
BarbaraHudson writes: From the you-pay-your-money-and-you-take-your-changes dept

ABC is reporting that gene test for risk of specific diseases are not as accurate as were thought, with different labs giving different interpretations.



At least 415 gene variants now have different interpretations that could sway a medical decision, such as whether to have healthy breasts or ovaries removed to lower the risk of cancer, or to get a medical device such as an implanted defibrillator to cut the risk of sudden cardiac death.

"The magnitude of this problem is bigger than most people thought," said Michael Watson, executive director of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, one of the study's authors and a partner in the data pooling project.

And it can harm patients. Rehm described a woman who had genetic testing and wrongly was told she did not have elevated risks for breast cancer. She later developed the disease but could have had preventive surgery had the right gene analyses been done.

+ - More than fifty vulnerabilities in D-Link NAS and NVR devices->

Submitted by ebux
ebux writes: SEARCH-LAB performed an independent security assessment on four different D-Link devices. The assessment has identified altogether 53 unique vulnerabilities in the latest firmware (dated 30-07-2014). Several vulnerabilities can be abused by a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code and gain full control over the devices.
Link to Original Source

+ - High Court Orders UK ISPs to Block eBook Sites->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: The High Court has granted an application by The Publishers Association to have several major 'pirate' eBook sites blocked at the ISP level. The action, a first for book publishers, requires BT, Virgin Media, Sky, TalkTalk and EE to block sites including Ebookee, LibGen and Freshwap within 10 days.

Rather than tackling unauthorized sites with direct legal action, major entertainment industry companies are increasingly attempting to disrupt ‘pirate’ operations with broader strokes.

One of the favored tools is site blocking, a technique that has gathered considerable momentum in Europe and the UK in particular. More than 120 domains are currently blocked by the country’s major ISPs, largely thanks to action taken by the movie and music industries plus soccer body The Premier League.

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