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Submission + - IBM 'TrueNorth' neuro-synaptic chip promises huge changes -- eventually

JakartaDean writes: Each chip contains 1.8 billion transistors but runs on 70 milliwatts. The chips are designed to behave like neurons—the basic building blocks of biological brains. Modha, the head of IBM's cognitive computing group, says the system (24 connected chips) in front of us spans 48 million of these artificial nerve cells, roughly the number of neurons packed into the head of a rodent.

Whereas conventional chips are wired to execute particular “instructions,” the TrueNorth juggles “spikes,” much simpler pieces of information analogous to the pulses of electricity in the brain. Spikes, for instance, can show the changes in someone’s voice as they speak—or changes in color from pixel to pixel in a photo. “You can think of it as a one-bit message sent from one neuron to another.” says one of the chip’s chief designers.

Submission + - IBM Discloses Working Version of 7nm Chip

JakartaDean writes: IBM said on Thursday that it had made working samples of ultradense computer chips, with roughly four times the capacity of today’s most powerful chips. The advances included using silicon germanium in key locations on the chip.

The announcement, made on behalf of an international consortium led by IBM, the giant computer company, is part of an effort to manufacture the most advanced computer chips in New York’s Hudson Valley, where IBM is investing $3 billion in a private-public partnership with New York State, GlobalFoundries, Samsung and equipment vendors.

Submission + - JP Morgan Chase Attacked; data for 76million stolen

JakartaDean writes: J.P. Morgan Chase said about 76 million households were affected by a cybersecurity attack on the bank this summer in one of the most sweeping disclosed breaches of a financial institution.

The largest U.S. bank by assets said the unknown attackers stole customers’ contact information—including names, email addresses, phone numbers and addresses. The breach, which was first disclosed in August and is still under investigation by the bank and law enforcement, extended to the bulk of the bank’s customer base, affecting an amount equivalent to two-thirds of American households. It also affected about seven million of J.P. Morgan’s small-business customers. It isn’t clear how many of those households are U.S.-based.

The bank said hackers were unable to gather detailed information on accounts, such as account numbers, passwords, Social Security numbers or dates of birth. Customer money is “safe,” the bank said in a statement to customers on Thursday.

Submission + - Born to RUN: Dartmouth Throwing BASIC a 50th B-Day Party

theodp writes: Still hanging on to a dog-eared copy of BASIC Computer Games? Back issues of Creative Computing? Well then, Bunky, mark your calendar for April 30th, because Dartmouth College is throwing BASIC a 50th birthday party that you won't want to miss! From the "invite" to BASIC at 50: "At 4 a.m. on May 1, 1964, in the basement of College Hall, Professor John Kemeny and a student programmer simultaneously typed RUN on neighboring terminals. When they both got back correct answers to their simple programs, time-sharing and BASIC were born. Kemeny, who later became Dartmouth's 13th president, Professor Tom Kurtz, and a number of undergraduate students worked together to revolutionize computing with the introduction of time-sharing and the BASIC programming language. Their innovations made computing accessible to all Dartmouth students and faculty, and soon after, to people across the nation and the world [video — young Bill Gates cameo @2:18]. This year, Dartmouth is celebrating 50 years of BASIC with a day of events on Wednesday, April 30. Please join us as we recognize the enduring impact of BASIC, showcase innovation in computing at Dartmouth today, and imagine what the next 50 years may hold." Be sure to check out the vintage photos on Flickr to see what real cloud computing looks like, kids!

Submission + - Sync Your Data to the Cloud with BitTorrent

JakartaDean writes: According to an article in CNet, If you do not trust online storage drives for file syncing across your devices or are frustrated with storage limits, there is another player in town. BitTorrent has released a new alpha version of its Sync software, which supports syncing folders across the Internet without going through an intermediary like Dropbox, Cloud Drive, or iCloud.
The Sync software uses the standard BitTorrent decentralized file-sharing technology to establish a secure file-synchronizing routine between your various devices. It does so by use of local peer discovery, peer exchange, and static known hosts as well as DHT and classic BitTorrent trackers to establish links between your systems, and then uses standard P2P BitTorrent protocols to transfer and reassemble files in chunks.
United Kingdom

Submission + - Britain Could Switch Off Airport Radar And Release Spectrum (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Britain is considering switching off air traffic control radar systems and using "passive radar" instead. A two year feasibility study will consider using a network of ground stations which monitor broadcast TV signals and measure echoes from aircraft to determine their location and velocity. The system is not a new idea — early radar experiments used BBC shortwave transmitters as a signal source before antenna technology produced a transceiver suitable for radar — but could now be better than conventional radar thanks to new antenna designs and signal processing techniques. It will also save money and energy by eliminating transmitters — and release spectrum for 5G services."

Submission + - AllTrials gaining momentum: GSK signs up (alltrials.net)

JakartaDean writes: AllTrials was set up by several groups concerned about public access to scientific findings with a particular focus on pharmaceutical research. They have an online petition you can sign. GSK have signed it, which marks a big step towards public access to such research. Wired has covered the story, and does a good job of explaining some of the management's interest in disclosure, including a record $3 billion fine last year.

Submission + - Tiny, Hackable Quadcopter Drone Launches Pre-Orders (wired.com)

Kinwolf writes: "A tiny new open source drone kit made by Bitcraze is buzzing its way to market this spring, targeted at hackers and modders who want to explore droning indoors as well as out."
Now I know what I'll do for the first 7 minutes of lunch break! The pre-order price is 173$ for the most avanced model, and some soldering is required. The telemetry being available is a pretty nice touch.

Submission + - Julian Assange Closer to Packing His Bags (cnn.com) 1

JakartaDean writes: Julian Assange lost his appeal before Britain's Supreme Court on Wednesday, which takes him another step closer to extradition to Sweden for questioning on sexual abuse accusations filed against him in August 2010.
But the court will allow Assange's attorneys to file a petition for the court to reconsider the ruling, which upheld an extradition order handed down in February 2011.


Submission + - Cost of Pre-Screening all youTube content: US$37 Billion (techdirt.com)

Fluffeh writes: "The folks that push "Anti-Piracy" and "Copying is Stealing" seem to often request that Google pre-screens content going up on YouTube and of course expect Google to cover the costs. No-one ever really asks the question how much it would cost, but some nicely laid out math by a curious mind points to a pretty hefty figure indeed. Starting with who to employ, their salary expectations and how many people it would take to cover the 72 hours of content uploaded every minute, the numbers start to get pretty large, pretty quickly. US$37 billion a year. Now compare that to Google's revenue for last year."

Creative Commons Launches CC+ License 67

E1ven writes "Creative Commons has this week released their CC+ protocol, which provides a way for authors to allow other people to commercially reuse their work, and give them a pre-negotiated fee or percentage. It makes it easy for people to release the Material under CC-No-Commercial, and then have a way to charge for commercial use if companies are interested."
The Internet

Submission + - Bell Canada DSL service throttles P2P arbitrarily

Dembonez writes: The fine folks over at P2Pnet.net have compiled some great details on a very dirty deed. That is, Bell Canada as a DSL ISP is following the lead of Comcast in the US and Rogers up in Canada by throttling P2P traffic. Beyond what the other two are doing, Bell are imposing bandwidth caps for 'unlimited' service subsribers, stating that they've gone over the allotted bandwidth restriction for the month. Of course, nowhere in their terms of service do they outline what that restriction is for unlimited users. It gets better, though! Bell being an ILEC have 3rd party reseller ISPs. If you were to leave Bell after being identified as a heavy user, they'll deny any of their 3rd party resellers from signing you up! Bell being as big as they are, they have 3 of the 5 seats on the committee for fair competition in Canada. This means that it's highly unlikely that any complaint about unfair business practices or false advertising would be quashed. If you're in Canada and using Bell, send them a message... and go elsewhere. Want to know more? TFA: http://www.p2pnet.net/story/13883

I was playing poker the other night... with Tarot cards. I got a full house and 4 people died. -- Steven Wright