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Comment: Re:Are they LEOs (Score 1) 71

What probably can be generalized is that only a minority refuses clearly unethical (some may say evil) orders from authority, as long as there is at least some, with Milgram not very large, force behind these orders.

Probably one of the reasons totalitarianism raises its ugly head time and again (and it is well on its way in the west this time): There are just too many participants that can be recruited with minimal effort and they tend to pile up. Humans are mostly still cavemen.

Comment: Re:And in other news (Score 1) 287

by gweihir (#49768603) Attached to: Study: Science Still Seen As a Male Profession

Your fact happens to be bunk because it ignores necessary details. Sure, Biology, Sociology, Gender Studies, Architecture and such often have more women, but that does not make a real-world "50% in the sciences". For example in architecture, I just recently talked to a PhD Construction Engineer (female, and not bad looking either) and she said that her reason to switch over from Architecture after a few weeks were all the very "special" women in there. (She did not say "stupid", but it was strongly implied.) What you find when you actually look is that the "50% women in sciences" (where they exist) are in soft subjects or subjects where a soft path exists and mostly/completely nonscientific subjects (gender studies, education "sciences", etc.) and really, that does not count. Show me some country where female EEs, computer scientists, Physicists, Mathematicians, etc. make 50% of the students, and we can talk again. (Yes, I know some women in all of these disciplines, several of them with PhDs. They do exist. But they are a minority and will remain so.)

Comment: Re:I'll believe it when I see it... (Score 1) 113

by Rei (#49767671) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

Its not that simple. You can't just recover it from nuclear reactor waste because it's mixed in with other isotopes of plutonium, and isn't in that great of quantities to begin with. So first off you have to reprocess nuclear waste to extract the neptunium - which again, itself isn't in very great quantities, it takes a lot of waste, and most places don't want to do waste reprocessing to begin with due to cost and liability issues. You then have to make neptunium targets and expose them to a neutron flux - that is, using neutronicity that could otherwise be used for power generation or other valuable purposes (it takes a lot of neutrons to make a tiny bit of Pu238). Pu238 should be more thought of as a manufactured product than as a byproduct of particular types of nuclear reactors.

There are a few other candidates for use as space power sources that actually are waste products, but they're all significantly worse performers. There are two other alternatives. One is to make a Sterling RTG, which was in development, but funding has been cut off (it's also kind of tricky because you have to ensure that something with moving parts will operate for decades in the harsh environment of space). The other is to make an actual nuclear reactor. This means almost limitless power, but it comes at the expense of not only massive development costs and public opposition, but a large minimum size and massive radiator requirements, as well as the same reliability challenges of sterling generators.

There's no easy solutions. Except, of course, to stop bloody wasting plutonium once we have it.

Privacy

San Bernardino Sheriff Has Used Stingray Over 300 Times With No Warrant 71

Posted by samzenpus
from the was-that-wrong? dept.
An anonymous reader writes: After a records request by Ars, the sheriff in San Bernardino County (SBSD) sent an example of a template for a "pen register and trap and trace order" application. The county attorneys claim what they sent was a warrant application template, even though it is not. The application cites no legal authority on which to base the request. "This is astonishing because it suggests the absence of legal authorization (because if there were clear legal authorization you can bet the government would be citing it)," Fred Cate, a law professor at Indiana University, told Ars. "Alternatively, it might suggest that the government just doesn't care about legal authorization. Either interpretation is profoundly troubling," he added. Further documents reveal that the agency has used a Stingray 303 times between January 1, 2014 and May 7, 2015.
EU

Greece Is Running Out of Money, Cannot Make June IMF Repayment 512

Posted by samzenpus
from the broker-than-broke dept.
jones_supa writes: Greece, the country which has been in extreme financial trouble and high debt for years, cannot make debt repayments to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) next month, unless it achieves a deal with creditors. 'The four installments for the IMF in June are €1.6 billion ($1.8 billion). This money will not be given and is not there to be given,' Interior Minister Nikos Voutsis told Greek Mega TV's weekend show. Shut out of bond markets and with bailout aid locked, cash-strapped Athens has been scraping state coffers to meet debt obligations and to pay wages and pensions. With its future as a member of the 19-nation eurozone potentially at stake, a second government minister accused its international lenders of subjecting it to slow and calculated torture.

Comment: Re:I'll believe it when I see it... (Score 4, Interesting) 113

by Rei (#49764673) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

"Love" is the nice way to put it. "Largess at the expense of all other solar system exploration" would be more accurate. Here's a graph. And it's always the same stupid justifications - how many times can we pretend to be excited about "revelations" that Mars was once in its past a wet place? Or that we're going to stumble into life any time soon in its perchlorate-rich, destroys-organics-on-contact regolith?

And it's not just huge amounts of money that they're wasting - they're also throwing away most of the remainder of our plutonium supply. At least there's money to start making it again, but it'll take time. Plutonium is precious, and it's needed for outer planet missions.

Comment: Re:Twenty five years of science destruction... (Score 2, Insightful) 113

by Rei (#49764639) Attached to: India Ends Russian Space Partnership and Will Land On the Moon Alone

I hate to be the one to tell you but academia generally pays poorly outside of the US. More so in a country like Russia that is still clawing its way back up from the economic collapse that occurred during the transition from communism to capitalism.

Perhaps if most of the country's wealth wasn't concentrated in the hands of a handful of corrupt oligarchs who live like a modern version of Roman emperors they'd be able to pay researchers a living wage.

Blackberry

Microsoft Reportedly May Acquire BlackBerry 113

Posted by samzenpus
from the circle-of-business dept.
New submitter techtsp writes: Microsoft is just one one of many companies reportedly looking to get a bigger piece of the enterprise mobile market by buying BlackBerry. Reports claim that Chinese firms including Huawei, Lenovo and Xiaomi are also interested in picking up BlackBerry following the company's recent return to profitability. This report comes on the heels of BlackBerry announcing it is cutting jobs across its global business units in an attempt to consolidate its software, hardware and applications business.

Comment: Re:Ducted fans? (Score 1) 74

by Rei (#49763377) Attached to: The Hoverboard Flies Closer To Reality

You don't need "antigravity" (which in all likelihood is impossible). Diamagnetic hoverboards would be possible... if we could make ridiculously powerful, compact halbach arrays in the board. Also you'd need a clever mechanism to detect and deal with flying over ferromagnetic material, or otherwise it's going to smack into your board really hard.

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