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Comment: Re:Mob dev is design by the least experienced (Score 1) 126 126

> There's a problem with mobs: they gang up and lynch anyone who isn't part of the mob.

Democracy often feels that way. It's not necessarily true, in the first meetings, even if it feels the same as later when it is true. Saying it always happens, is not realistic.

Comment: Re:So what's that in metric? (Score 1) 409 409

> But being 25 lbs heavier in muscle then some one who is just skinny is healthier

The definition of "skinny" and "healthier" aren't well defined here. Your major surgical survival rate is better, the more muscle weight that you have (body recovers better with active stores, anesthesia is easier to regulate, and more) . No I don't have a link to a study, but it's the Germans or English or Finnish that posted the data back in the 90's iirc.

Comment: Re:A poor workman... (Score 1) 281 281

Did PHP kill your mother? What is the metric for being horrible? Is it based on lack of adoption or is it some score or is it something you only know when you see it?

> PHP is a significant barrier for existing projects.
> Look at the pile of crap that is Wordpress or any PHP CMS for that matter.

WP is confusing, unmaintainable code, except for the brave few who do. Those outliers aren't really important in the grand scheme. I have encountered many proprietary CMS systems that were maintainable and maintained for years. I implemented diff in PHP in 1999. It was incomprehensible but it was used as an internal visual tool. The language is for facilitating a functional program and later for other programmers to understand and change. In this way, the projects of WP and my diff were horrible (they failed half their purpose). I cannot attribute your outrage to the language.

> Ask Facebook how much money and time they have spent trying to hack around PHP's many warts.

FB rewrote the JIT (which allowed for language changes) but it wasn't to get around the warts. They have explicitly said it was for performance reasons - http://readwrite.com/2010/02/0...

Comment: Re:Social mobility was killed, but not this way (Score 1) 1032 1032

> you can only legally justify H1Bs on the basis that there's no qualified US residents for the position

That statement is a reasonable description of one requirement for a work visa in Canada.

In the US, it's not part of the H1B process:
http://www.nolo.com/legal-ency...

Comment: Re:I wouldn't (Score 1) 557 557

> 15 years ago your recommendations would have been things like CAT5e drops in multiple spots in every room

Last year I did something similar to that. Why wouldn't you? The drops are separate from the hosted technology.

Coax, Ethernet, power, ducting, double pane glass in vinyl frames, electronic outer door locks, cameras, inset LED ceiling lights, tankless water heater (if you live in temperate parts of the US and need the space), solar panels depending on a number of concerns that affect cost-benefit.

Comment: Re:We the taxayer get screwed. (Score 1) 356 356

> The cost of the employees is not limited to their salaries.

The company is not just the sum of employee costs. Have some integrity. Expanding on the definition of "spending on employees" is redundant and only serves to weaken the premise (subsidy/employees = huge effective salaries).

> They would not be employed if the business didn't make some sort of economic sense and have work to do and that seems to be reliant on the subsidies.

This is not logical. There are plenty of positions (like the janitors and lawyers) that are not dependent on the specific business model to have jobs. Some of the employees may be able to get different jobs. I'm not sure someone who is an expert on Tesla batteries couldn't manage to get a contractor's license.

After scrutinizing your comments, I'm going to say you failed to reasonably explain why the subsidies would result in $360,000+ per employee. Employees are not the only cost (as you've implied), so maybe you need to look into their facility costs and taxes and debts (like equipment leases)...you know the costs that go into running a company. This was my only point, to which you had a truly strange response.

Maybe you'll realize it, maybe you'll just keep trying to argue the articulation of a knee-jerk thought you had.

Comment: Re:Look to larger, established companies for testi (Score 1) 271 271

> I've been using perl professionally for 22 years now, and I'm not seeing much of a drop off,

I see that it's nearly disappeared from Southern California, while it seems to be a skill that people sometimes pick up in Northern California and it's more common in the London area (when I've worked with UK teams). That's just based on experience and the 200 odd resumes I've picked from, in the last few years. Perl is sometimes used as a glue language, but that's a far cry from the goto scripting language of the 90s.

Comment: Re:Remnants of a forgotten planet (Score 2) 78 78

> Having a diamond the size of Texas would certainly create a new space race

Diamonds are not a compelling reason to go to other planets. The difference in economic scale is staggering. Diamonds are an artificially constrained resource. De beers and friends have conspired to keep cheap artificial diamonds (not fake zirconium) out of the luxury market, somewhat successfully. This doesn't mean it's work spending billions of dollars to get more. We can manufacture them here, cheaper than going out into orbit, much less another planet.

Comment: Re:Herbivores dying out? Not cows I hope! (Score 1) 146 146

> A variety of independent measurements of solar activity including satellite data, sunspot numbers, UV levels and solar magnetograms all paint a consistent picture.

This is a much more informed discussion than I can muster:
https://www.skepticalscience.c...

To say it's "man made" is a bit of a misnomer. Releasing the energy that the planet has stored for millenia alongside the emissions our industry has produced, have likely started to bring about an irregular cyclical condition. The Earth approached this state after a Yellowstone-super-eruption or ELE asteroid arrived, but it's not all that unusual over the span of Earth's existence. Is it the Sun? Indirectly. There's no good science to support solar output (recent, since the dawn of man) is the direct cause.

The real bad news would be if an escalating event occurs concurrently with the peak of the warming.

"I don't believe in sweeping social change being manifested by one person, unless he has an atomic weapon." -- Howard Chaykin

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