Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - 3D Windowing System Developed Using Wayland, Oculus Rift->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Developed as part of a university master thesis is a "truly 3D" windowing system environment. The 3D desktop was developed as a Qt Wayland compositor and output to an Oculus Rift display and then controlled using a high-precision Razer mouse. Overall, it's interesting research for bringing 2D windows into a 3D workspace using Wayland and the Oculus Rift. The code is hosted as the Motorcar Compositor. A video demonstration is on YouTube."
Link to Original Source
China

+ - How the web makes a real-life Breaking Bad possible—and legal->

Submitted by gallifreyan99
gallifreyan99 (3502381) writes "The real revolution in drugs isn't Silk Road—it's the open web. Thanks to the net, almost anyone with a basic handle on chemistry can design, manufacture and sell their own narcotics, and in most cases the cops are utterly unable to stop them. This piece is kind of crazy: the writer actually creates a new powerful-but-legal stimulant based on a banned substance, and gets a Chinese lab to manufacture it."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Sharing the road (Score 1) 201

You are a braver rider than I. The first day I had my SWB recumbent I pulled up to a red light next to a pickup. There was no way the driver could have seen me below his right bumper, and a trike is lower. If the driver had decided to turn right, I would have been crushed. I got a flag the next day. But now I've given up on the recumbent for commuting in my small town -- I just don't feel as safe as I do on the more nimble and visible upright. Perhaps a trike, being statically stable, would provide more confidence. And perhaps the body of a velomobile would stand out more. But you are still very low down.

Comment: Sharing the road (Score 2) 201

Obviously no one here has ever ridden a recumbent bicycle in traffic. If you had, you'd see how rediculous it is to even think of taking one of these on pavement shared with cars. YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY INVISIBLE TO CARS in a vehicle this low. And because of the enclosure you have no peripheral vision so you cannot look out for other vehicles -- even other velomobiles. I didn't see one "safety flag" in any of the pictures, which tells me that none of these vehicles are used by anyone who cares for their life, or they are just toys for a weekend cruise. As other posters have said, these are only practical with a different road system, and I argue a different bike path system. How would you handle passing a group of 15mph standard bicyclists in your vision impared wide wheelbase trike wheeled monster? You wouldn't, it wouldn't be safe on bike paths of today for you or the other riders.

Comment: CE curriculums and Embedded Systems Conferences (Score 2) 88

by Jack Greenbaum (#39810987) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Sources For Firmware and Hardware Books?
A Computer Engineering curriculum is much better than a traditional CS degree for this type of work, so you might look at what texts are being used in high quality CE programs. The Embedded Systems Conferences from UBM are also a good source of training for low level firmware implementation.
China

+ - Recycled Christmas Lights in China Get Happy Endi->

Submitted by
retroworks
retroworks writes "Shanghai based reporter Adam Minter visits where recycled Christmas Tree lighting goes in Chiina. Visiting Shijao, the town known as the Mecca for Christmas tree light recycling, he finds good news. The recycling practices in China have really cleaned up. Plastic casings once burned are now recycled into shoe soles in a wet process (film attached). Minter concludes that even if you try to recycle your wire in the USA, that the special equipment and processes for Christmas light recycling have been perfected in China "to the benefit of the environment, and pocketbooks, in both countries.""
Link to Original Source
NASA

+ - Mysterious Namibian "Space Ball" Demystified->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The mysterious metallic orb that fell from space this November may, according to one source, be a hydrazine bladder from an unmanned rocket. Investigators reached out to the public to see if anyone was able to identify the strange ball. Speculators have arrived at varied conclusions about the object, proposing that it was everything from a doomsday device, to reindeer droppings, to extra terrestrial space probes. Sadly Occams Razor may prove to win out once again; the simplest conclusion is most often the correct one."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Cool hack (Score 1) 250

by Jack Greenbaum (#36491956) Attached to: JavaScript Decoder Plays MP3s Without Flash

Which developer do you think is going to be more productive? The dude having to know 3-4 different technologies, or the dude who just needs to know JS?

The developer that uses the right tool for the job will be more productive.

That means using a language with static type checking and a productive debug environment. Learning a new system infrastructure takes time, but only finding out about easily preventable failures during testing instead of compile time costs more.

Comment: Re:Small company (Score 1) 200

by Jack Greenbaum (#34359142) Attached to: What Software Specification Tools Do You Use?
I have to agree here. You say you are a small company, in my experience requirements for even modest size projects are generally easy to manage with human language documents, just label everything for traceability. If a word processor is too awkward switch to a spreadsheet, or use them in combo. But I do highly recommend using a defect tracking database. I like Jira.
Businesses

Japanese Game Developers Go West 84

Posted by Soulskill
from the bring-ideas dept.
donniebaseball23 writes "More and more Japanese game studios and publishers are looking toward the West. But as the industry becomes more global, is this really such a bad thing? From the article: 'Gameplay is an art that transcends borders, and it simply makes good business sense to keep your eyes open for opportunities no matter where they present themselves, as Zenimax, EA and THQ clearly have. Far from ruining the Japanese gaming industry, it may in fact save some of the best Japanese developers from considering retirement or a career change. They'll be able to make games on their own terms with their own original IP, and shouldn't it ultimately be about these creative types being able to realize their visions?""

If you had better tools, you could more effectively demonstrate your total incompetence.

Working...