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Comment: Stem cell therapy (Score 3, Insightful) 552

by Jace Harker (#47074729) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Communication With Locked-in Syndrome Patient?

In addition to technical solutions, you might want to investigate stem cell therapy to regrow or heal nerves in the spinal column. The technology is still in the early stages but has been show to improve motor and sensory function in some cases. Here's a recent review article from PloS that might be a starting point for you.

Comment: What about subscription journals? (Score 2) 114

by Jace Harker (#45327157) Attached to: Hoax-Proofing the Open Access Journals

This paper has already been extensively critiqued. To me the biggest problem is that he didn't include any subscription journals.

Many intentionally flawed or nonsense papers have been submitted -- and published! -- to reputable journals in the past.

This latest demonstration by Bohannan just shows that the peer review system needs improvement. It does not show whether Open Access journals are better or worse than subscription journals in terms of quality and reliability of content.

Comment: Why not make/license Apple/Android magazine apps? (Score 2) 298

I'm not a huge advocate of DRM or anything, but it seems like you should aim at the Apple/Android tablet market. Build or license a magazine app for content delivery. It'll let you control how much access your users get to the content -- can they save a copy? email it to someone? etc. -- while making it really convenient for your users to get the content delivered regularly and with minimum effort. I suppose you could try to do this on the desktop, but the mobile device world seems tailor-made to your needs, assuming your target audience usually owns mobile devices.

Intel

+ - Intel prepares to use lasers, light to shuffle data between computers ->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Intel is taking the first steps to implement thin fiber optics that will use lasers and light as a faster way to move data inside computers, replacing the older and slower electrical wiring technology found in most computers today. Intel's silicon photonics technology will be implemented at the motherboard and rack levels and use light to move data between storage, networking and computing resources. Light is considered a much faster vehicle to move data than copper cables. The silicon photonics technology will be part of a new generation of servers that will need faster networking, storage and processing subsystems, said Justin Rattner, Intel's chief technology officer, during a keynote at the Open Compute Summit in Santa Clara this week."
Link to Original Source

+ - Darth Vader is still unpaid-> 2

Submitted by
inode_buddha
inode_buddha writes "In a case of Hollywood accounting at its finest, it seems that David Prowse is still not getting any residuals from his role as Darth Vader in Return of the Jedi. The film has grossed nearly half a billion on a production budget of 32.5 million. Says David, "I get these occasional letters from Lucasfilm saying that we regret to inform you that as Return of the Jedi has never gone into profit, we’ve got nothing to send you. Now here we’re talking about one of the biggest releases of all time.”"
Link to Original Source
Power

+ - Triple-junction solar cell could break 50 percent conversion barrier->

Submitted by fergus07
fergus07 (1145927) writes "The current world record for triple-junction solar cell efficiency is 44 percent, but a collaboration between the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Imperial College of London, and MicroLink Devices Inc. has lead to a multi-junction photovoltaic cell design that could break the 50 percent conversion efficiency barrier under concentrated solar illumination."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Limit reviews to purchasers of the product (Score 5, Interesting) 248

by Jace Harker (#42397861) Attached to: Amazon: Authors Can't Review Books

One blindingly obvious way to cut down on fake and artificial reviews: only allow reviews from people who have actually purchased the product.

Amazon already highlights reviews by people who have purchased the product, so the functionality already exists. Why not take the next step and only allow those people to write reviews in the first place?

Alternately, Amazon could allow anyone to write a review, but would only calculate the star rating based on purchasers' reviews.

Comment: Re:Uniball Vision Micro (Score 1) 712

by Jace Harker (#41838375) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: The Search For the Ultimate Engineer's Pen

I'll second this. The Uni-ball Vision Elite Micro is 0.5mm and produces a reasonably fine line (depending on the paper). The ink doesn't bleed, it requires very little pressure, is quasi-waterproof, the pen won't leak if you take it on an airplane, and the writing experience has a great feel, not scratchy or uneven. It took me years to find this pen and now I never buy any other kind. Obligatory Amazon link: Package of 12.

Comment: Re:Some notes From The Creator (Score 2, Interesting) 154

by Jace Harker (#33385642) Attached to: Video Showing Half a Million Asteroid Discoveries

I would love to see the original, full resolution video. Could you upload it somewhere, or perhaps put it up on BitTorrent?

Also, what data sets did you use in the preparation of this movie? I would be interested to see the orbit specifications for all of these asteroids.

Comment: Re:Magic (Score 1) 562

by Jace Harker (#31236178) Attached to: Fuel Cell Marvel "Bloom Box" Gaining Momentum

Based on the description in the OP, this sounds like just a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell. There's nothing particularly revolutionary about that. It still emits carbon dioxide, and it still requires fuel. Presumably you would feed it with some kind of "carbon neutral" biofuel.

So my question is: why the hype? How is the "Bloom Box" any better than installing a traditional generator powered with biogas? From a practical perspective they seem to do roughly the same thing: take in fuel and spit out electricity and carbon dioxide.

Comment: How is this different from Windows or Mac? (Score 0) 769

by Jace Harker (#30310646) Attached to: Is Linux Documentation Lacking?

True, the built-in Linux documentation is often lacking. But in spite of that, it's much, much better than the built-in help files for Windows or Mac.

No matter which OS I use, Google is always my first stop for technical help. The difference between them is that with Linux, I usually find a helpful site almost immediately (usually on the Ubuntu Forums). With Windows, the best help I can find is usually some obscure, confusing entry at the Microsoft Support website. Ick.

Comment: Why the sudden outrage? (Score 3, Interesting) 555

by Jace Harker (#30031786) Attached to: Verizon Droid Tethering Comes At a Hefty Price

This isn't new: these terms are exactly the same as Verizon's current plans for Blackberry service. $30/month for the smartphone "data plan", plus an extra $30/month for tethering. And yes, they've always called it "unlimited", but it's always been capped at 5GB. I've been paying these rates for some time. It's annoying, but it's been going on for ages.

It's amusing to me that people are only getting outraged about this now because Verizon is selling a popular new phone that everyone wants to buy.

Comment: Re:Another troll summary? (Score 1) 166

by Jace Harker (#29839121) Attached to: Amazon Hobbles Features For International Kindle

It's amazing they let you cross borders with books in your possession.

The problem is not crossing a border with a book you already own. The problem, for Amazon, is having the rights to sell a book in a different country. Plus higher wireless costs. Plus VAT. All in all, I'm surprised the price is bump is as small as 40%.

PC Pro has discovered. ... an Amazon spokesperson confessed.

The OP summary is quite a troll. PC Pro hasn't "discovered" anything: all of this information was easy to find on the International Kindle website the day it was announced.

The world is not octal despite DEC.

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