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+ - Thousands companies share with NSA ->

Submitted by da5idnetlimit.com
da5idnetlimit.com (410908) writes "Bloomberg is reporting that the recent NSA Prism scandal is just a tiny scratch on the privacy surface. Citing "four people familiar with the process", the agency claims that in fact thousands of technology, finance and manufacturing companies work with US national security.
Interestingly it explains, for instance, how Microsoft gives government agencies a heads-up when it comes to bug fixesâ"and two sources describe how the news is used to exploit vulnerabilities in software sold to foreign governments.

On a side note maybe we can thank the NSA for giving more steam to Linux on the desktop. And on servers. And routers 8)"

Link to Original Source

+ - Kickass Torrents' KAT.ph domain seized by Philippine authorities->

Submitted by hypnosec
hypnosec (2231454) writes "Kickass Torrents’ wasn’t accessible since about yesterday and now it has been confirmed that the domain name of the torrent website has been seized by Philippine authorities. Local record labels and the Philippine Association of the Recording Industry said that the torrent site was doing “irreparable damages” to the music industry and following a formal complaint the authorities resorted to seize of the main domain name. The torrent site hasn’t given up and is operating as usual under a new domain name. The torrent site’s main domain name KAT.ph ran into trouble yesterday and it was believed that the control of the domain name was no longer with the original owners. The Government of Philippines has confirmed that the domain name has been seized based on formal complaints and copyright grounds."
Link to Original Source

+ - Warner sued for massive copyfraud->

Submitted by Maximum Prophet
Maximum Prophet (716608) writes "Warner/Chappell Music makes millions of dollars per year licensing the song "Happy Birthday to You", although it's obviously out of copyright. Now "Good Morning to You Productions", a documentary film company is suing to get them to return the millions of ill gotten gains. Good luck. All Warner has to do to keep their monopoly is to get Congress to extend copyright on music so they own HBTY in perpetuity."
Link to Original Source

Comment: one thing seemingly missed (Score 3, Insightful) 341

by yagu (#43966603) Attached to: What Can You Find Out From Metadata?
I hear over and over in this discussion the salve "only the metadata has been recorded".

I'm guessing that's simply a function of limited technology, i.e., "today" that's just too much data to store. But in keeping with technologies amazing storage capacity growth, it's only a matter of time before the content is also recorded and archived. It's just too tempting not to.

Mars

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-a-look dept.
SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."
Networking

Misconfigured Open DNS Resolvers Key To Massive DDoS Attacks 179

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the check-your-sources dept.
msm1267 writes with an excerpt From Threat Post: "While the big traffic numbers and the spat between Spamhaus and illicit webhost Cyberbunker are grabbing big headlines, the underlying and percolating issue at play here has to do with the open DNS resolvers being used to DDoS the spam-fighters from Switzerland. Open resolvers do not authenticate a packet-sender's IP address before a DNS reply is sent back. Therefore, an attacker that is able to spoof a victim's IP address can have a DNS request bombard the victim with a 100-to-1 ratio of traffic coming back to them versus what was requested. DNS amplification attacks such as these have been used lately by hacktivists, extortionists and blacklisted webhosts to great success." Running an open DNS resolver isn't itself always a problem, but it looks like people are enabling neither source address verification nor rate limiting.
Google

Google Pledges Not To Sue Any Open Source Projects Using Their Patents 153

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the now-and-forever dept.
sfcrazy writes "Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In the pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor, or developer of Open Source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google's patents covered by the pledge to other technologies." This is in addition to the Open Invention Network, and their general work toward reforming the patent system. The patents covered in the OPN will be free to use in Free/Open Source software for the life of the patent, even if Google should transfer ownership to another party. Read the text of the pledge. It appears that interaction with non-copyleft licenses (MIT/BSD/Apache) is a bit weird: if you create a non-free fork it appears you are no longer covered under the pledge.

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