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Submission + - User Backlash at Slashdot Beta Site ( 3

hduff writes: Look at almost any current Slashdot story and see loyal, long-time members rail against the new site design, willing to burn precious karma points to post off-topic rants against the new design and it being forced on users by the Dice Overlords. Discussion has begun to create an alternate site.

Submission + - DOE Announces Philips as L Prize Winner (

JStyle writes: The DOE has officially announced a winner of the L Prize, awarding Philips with the 60 W Incandescent Bulb replacement. Philips' LED light bulb won using less than 10 W of electricity while claiming a life of greater than 25,000 hours. The light bulb is set to go on sale as early as spring of 2012. Pricing is yet unavailable.

Submission + - ISO specifies testing DVD lifetime ( 1

juct writes: "The International Standards Organization (ISO), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the Optical Storage Technology Association (OSTA) have specified a testing procedure to determine the durability of blank DVDs. This means, that media manufacturers will soon be able to specify the probable lifetime of their DVDs. Full story on heise online"

Submission + - 700 MHz Auction Begins Thursday

necro81 writes: On Thursday, after much speculation and wrangling, the FCC will begin auctioning licenses to the coveted 700 MHz band that will be vacated by analog TV in 2009. The NY Times has a good summary of who the players are (AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, Google, et al.), how the auction will work, and what it could mean for consumers. The auction will go on for several months, but you can keep tabs on the bids at this FCC site.
Portables (Apple)

Submission + - Apple's Unfixable Gadgets: Made to Break? (

hankmt writes: "Several of Apple's newest gadgets, including the new Nano, the iPod Classic and the iPhone are built to be so difficult to disassemble that repair companies are refusing to take them. Users are thus forced to return the gadgets to Apple, who likely has to damage and replace the case for every repair. The result: wasted time, money and resources, and a lot of angry 3rd-party repair shop owners."

Verizon Embraces Google's Android 148

An anonymous reader writes "BusinessWeek has up an article on Verizon's decision to fully support Android. After passing on the iPhone, the company says they're going to open their network to more devices, move their network to GSM-based radio technology (LTE), and now support Android. 'In an open-access model, though, Verizon Wireless won't offer the same level of customer service as it does for the roughly 50 phone models featured in its handset lineup. Though the company will insist on testing all phones developed to run on its network in the open-access program, Verizon plans only to ensure the wireless connection is working for customers who buy those devices.'"
The Almighty Buck

The $10 Billion Poker Game Begins 169

Hugh Pickens writes "Monday was the deadline for potential bidders to file with the Federal Communications Commission over the auction of the 700-megahertz band, a useful swath of the electromagnetic spectrum that is being freed up by the move to digital television. Once bidders file they become subject to strict 'anticollusion' rules that in effect prohibit participants from discussing any aspect of their bidding until the auction is over. The next official word will be late December or mid-January, when the FCC announces who has been approved to bid. The auction will start on January 24. Participants will use an Internet system to enter bids on any of 1,099 separate licenses that are being offered (pdf). Most coveted seems to be the C block, 12 regional licenses that can be combined to create a national wireless network. This is the spectrum Google is presumed to be most interested in. The bidding will be conducted in a series of rounds (pdf)."

Submission + - Breathalyzed? Ask for the source code! (

stevedcc writes: "Anandtech are running an article about a Minnesota man who is asking for the breathlyzer source code as part of his defence against a drunk driving charge. From the article:

One of the common criticisms (which is also made of voting machines) of breath devices is that the "state-certified" models are updated even after they are certified. The companies that manufacture the machines make tweaks, bug fixes, and even add new features, but the machines are not generally recertified after every single source code change. This means that any given machine could potentially be running non-certified code, code which may or may not have errors.....As a bonus, if a company proves unwilling to turn over the code, the case often gets thrown out without any need to prove that the source code is in fact flawed.


Submission + - NASA astronauts 'flew when drunk' (

fiannaFailMan writes: NASA's HR policies are coming under more scrutiny now as it emerges that shuttle crewmembers have been drunk during missions. Maybe they've been listening to too much Zephram Cochrane — "I sure as hell ain't goin up there sober!"

[A special review] panel report said that doctors and other astronauts had raised concerns that the two drunken crew members posed a flight safety risk, but the astronauts were not grounded. The report did not say when the incidents took place, or whether they involved pilots.


Submission + - The History of Windows (

bobbyc303 writes: The history of windows according to Microsoft. Interesting read, I came into the game around 1987, anyone remember using the earlier versions?

Submission + - Is eBay Now Completely Unusable?

An anonymous reader writes: I recently read an article about one person's experience trying to sell on eBay, which closely reflects my own. According to the author, eBay is now riddled with so much active fraud and spam that is has become impossible to sell anything or conduct business in any way. He suggests several ways eBay could fix the problem, none of which have yet been implemented. So I'd like to tap the Slashdot community and get more advice for how to make eBay usable for myself, and what else you think eBay should do to fix all their problems?

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