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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 6 declined, 5 accepted (11 total, 45.45% accepted)

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Submission + - MIT Study: Prolonged Low-level Radiation Damage Heals (

JSBiff writes: A new study from MIT scientists suggests that the guidelines governments use to determine when to evacuate people following a nuclear accident may be too conservative.

The study, led by Bevin Engelward and Jacquelyn Yanch and published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found that when mice were exposed to radiation doses about 400 times greater than background levels for five weeks, no DNA damage could be detected.

Submission + - NOAA Study: Radiation from Fukushima very dilluted, seafood safe (

JSBiff writes: Ars Technica is reporting on a study by NOAA scientists who surveyed the ocean near Fukushima, which concludes that while a lot of radioactivity was released into the water, as would be expected, it dilluted out to levels that pose little risk to wildlife or humans, and that the seafood is safe to eat.

Perhaps we needn't worry so much about "millions of gallons of radioactive water" being released into the ocean, like it's a major environmental disaster, as it's really not — the ocean is many orders of magnitude larger than any accidental release of radiation which might happen from a nuclear plant.

Submission + - Berkeley Research Suggests Low Radiation Damage Do 1

JSBiff writes: Breast Cancer researches at the Berkeley National Lab will be publishing a study, in which they, "have found evidence to suggest that for low dose levels of ionizing radiation, cancer risks may not be directly proportional to dose. This contradicts the standard model for predicting biological damage from ionizing radiation – the linear-no-threshold hypothesis or LNT – which holds that risk is directly proportional to dose at all levels of irradiation."

The evidence grows that low-level radiation should not be viewed as a threat to public health.

Submission + - Japan re-opens some towns near Fukushima (

JSBiff writes: Bloomberg, among others, is reporting that the Japanese govt has partially lifted the evacuation order, allowing residents to return to 5 towns previously in the evacuation zone. Additionally, a key milestone has been reached in achieving a full "cold shutdown" of the damaged reactors — the temperature of all three reactors has dropped below 100 deg. C.

It's a shame that they were unable to return home for 6 months, and for people who lived closer to the plant, they might never be allowed to return home. Now the question is, will residents actually *want* to return, other than to maybe retrieve stuff they left behind?

United States

Submission + - NRC Study lowers hazard estimate for Nuke Plants (

JSBiff writes: "With the incident at Fukushima causing much renewed concern about the risks of nuclear power this year, the New York Times reports that The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has released the preliminary version of a report due out in April 2012, based upon new science about the behavior of Cesium-137, which finds that the public health hazards of nuclear accidents at the types or reactor designs currently in common use, are lower than previously thought, based upon older, outdated scientific knowledge."

Submission + - infected by malware? 4

JSBiff writes: Like probably many slashdotters, I regularly visit the sci/tech news site Upon visiting tonight, every page loaded causes the AVG Antivirus software on my PC to alert me that a javascript file being loaded by the site is infected. Readers may want to avoid browsing Arstechnica until they have the problem sorted.

Submission + - MySQL Engineer's Son Needs Marrow Transplant

JSBiff writes: As I was browsing around the website tonight, looking for the MySQL Community edition download link, I saw that MySQL was requesting donations to help the son of one their support engineers.

"Donations are requested to help Andrii Nikitin, a MySQL support engineer in Ukraine, provide for his son Ivan who requires a bone marrow transplant operation. The cost of this operation is expected to be between €150,000 — €250,000 ($235,000 — $400,000). Please help us provide Ivan a chance to live."

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