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Submission + - Can my browser speak to your browser? (

mikejuk writes: This could be a revolution about to happen.
The W3C have a working group defining an API for real time and P2P communiction between browsers — without a server gettting in the way. This would allow one browser to talk to another directly and share photos, music, audio. In fact it lets your browser become a phone.
This is the return to how personal computing used to be before big servers farms returned us tot he days of the mainframe. A realtime P2P API for browsers could transform the landscape and re-establish a non-centralized architecture.

Submission + - VPS security. Can Mallory compromise Alice?

gpuk writes: Like everyone else, I have enthusiastically embraced the virtualisation revolution and now recommend this approach to most of my clients when they are deciding how to host their web properties. Root access, immediate provisioning and easy scalability all for a fraction of what dedicated hosting costs. What's not to like? On the face of it nothing but lately I've been wondering about security. Specifically, what happens if a malicious user finds a bug in Xen / Vmware / KVM allowing them to break out of their guest instance and on to the host machine (that may also be running my guests)? Scanning the FAQs of popular VPS providers yields surprisingly little detail on what security exists between my guest and someone else's and what attack vectors might theoretically exist. Is this the achillies heal of virtualised hosting versus dedicated or am I being paranoid?

Submission + - Why Faster-than-Light Travel is Impossible ( 1

rsk writes: "reddit user purpsicle27 asked "Why exactly can nothing go faster than the speed of light?" and got a slew of excellent replies. One reply in particular, by user "RobotRollCall" (RRC), was a favorite thanks to its simplification of an inherently complex matter and easy to understand examples.

According to other reddit folk, RRC has been notoriously tight-lipped about his real identity but continually drops excellent written comments into the community from time to time. reddit user mazsa suggested that RRC is actually popular science author Brian Greene, author of the The Fabric of the Cosmos. I don't know if that is true, but the reviews from his existing books seem to suggest that the easy-to-understand style is a very Greene trait."


Submission + - Android Honeycomb Born Too Early

adeelarshad82 writes: This year's Mobile World Confress was the stage for dozens of new tablets, unfortunately though Android Honeycomb tablets lacked presence to the extend that amongst the top Android tablets showcased at the show, only Motorola Xoom was running Honeycomb where as others were running either Android 2.3 or older versions. Moreover most of the top apps announced for the OS were not new; just reworked. Gigaom may believe that Honeycomb tablets will be iPad's true competition but in my opinion progress has been slow. Honeycomb was born too early, primarily out pressure of iPad getting a one year head start in the tablet industry.

Submission + - German wiki: minister Guttenberg is a plagiarist! (

clemenstimpler writes: Quote from the article: "A website calling itself GuttenPlag, where users can post all incidences of apparent plagiarism they spot in Guttenberg's manuscript, already claims to have found incidences on more than every second page. " Link: Jimmy Wales has noticed the uproar as well:

Submission + - German Foreign Office Abandoning Desktop Linux (

An anonymous reader writes: According to a report last week. it looks like the German Foreign Office government department are switching back to Windows from Linux. Their primary reason is the cost of producing drivers for printers and scanners, and for training users. No concrete figures have been released, and in 2007 the department's switch was touted as being a huge success. The opposition party are pressing for the government to reveal how much each option will cost and to prove that moving to Windows is really going to bring any cost saving benefit.

Submission + - Late Night Gaming Banned in Vietnam (

R3d M3rcury writes: Vietnam's Ministry of Information and Communication has asked ISPs to block access to on-line games between 10:00PM and 8:00AM. 'The request, made on Wednesday, is another move from the authority to mitigate the side effects of online games. The request follows numerous stiff measures by the ministry to tackle the issue, including cutting internet access to agents at night beginning last September.'

Submission + - Is MS cheating on its own HTML 5 test? 1

itamblyn writes: I just upgraded to the IE 9 RC and decided to see how it did on HTML 5 speed tests compared to the most recent dev channel build of Chrome (11.0.672.2). The result was more than x3 faster performance by IE (using a test created by MS in fairness). Interestingly though, the images and text were somewhat blurry, as if it wasn't being rendered at the full resolution of the window. Is this "legal"? Is Chrome losing because it's not cutting corners, or is this trick fair game and Chrome should be doing it as well. If you have a windows machine, you can do the comparison yourself here:

Submission + - Hacker takes stance against Sony in PS3 lawsuit (

mede writes: In an interesting turn of events, Sony might have stumbled into a>tough nut to crack. George Hotz (aka GeoHot) famous for his iPhone hacking achievements, is planning on fighting the big corporation on removing his free speech rights at utilizing his fully paid for hardware. Hotz has always claimed being anti-piracy (since iPhone activities) and expresses has never pirated any game or even signed to PSN agreements. He's asking for donations to fight Sony back and try to achieve something similar to what was previously accomplished by the EFF in regard to cellphones. I've already donated.

Do not underestimate the value of print statements for debugging.