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Comment: Re:Ready? (Score 1) 469

by JPLR (#39219047) Attached to: Why Didn't the Internet Take Off In 1983?

I think it's the X25 network that will be unplugged.
It's a lot of years there is no Minitel (the terminal) in use in France: Most terminals were built in the 80' or at the latest in the 90'. There was an emulator for PC on Internet mostly for for B2B users.
The sad thing is that France still uses pay per use on Internet even on Broadband. There are some websites that provide content only if the user agrees to pay a premium on it's Telco operator bill. And the is an opt-out option so many users are scared when they are told they "made Minitel" when in fact they didn't. A link in French (sorry, but it's just to prove my point) http://assistance.orange.fr/des-connexions-minitel-sur-votre-facture-3217.php

Comment: Re:Slashdot flamebait headline misses the point (Score 4, Interesting) 600

by JPLR (#38933223) Attached to: India Turns Down American Fighter Jets, Buys From France

I am sorry to have no moderator points at the moment. I completly agree with you about /. being now mostly a place were people push their agenda, I can bear corporate or even Web site's submissions (discovery, universetoday) in need of click flow but political agenda against other countries is very ugly. LIke you I came here for science discussion not for stupid submissions that have nothing to do with the /. motto "stuff that matters".

Comment: Re:So what? (Score 1) 848

by JPLR (#38257310) Attached to: Have Walled Gardens Killed the Personal Computer?

Why posting as AC? This attitude toward users and needs seems to me very healthy. And it may have much more in your reflection that is visible on the surface, such as the reference to IT instead to PC. IT may be dying as a mass industry that users never found very satisfying. I doubt that PC will ever die at least because we need PC for spreadshhets, word processors and industrial computing appliance.

Comment: Re:Who can tell... (Score 3, Informative) 209

by JPLR (#38111008) Attached to: France To Tax the Internet To Pay For Music
There is no such tax at all at the moment. President Sarkozy told to the press that this kind of tax could exist in the future. This means the government has to propose a law which it hadn't, that the parliament vote for it (there are at least two turns between the two houses if every PM agrees which is highly unlikely, and otherwise many turns until an agreement is reached) and finally that the government fund the law which means the chance that such a law would be implemented in very low.

Comment: Re:Definitely not (Score 1) 427

by JPLR (#37374338) Attached to: Has Cleverbot Passed the Turing Test?
Seriously, some people would also have some problems with the test you propose. Perhaps what you depict is (1) an intelligence test (2) for people that work in university, not real life people. I think we now have another more urgent problem than defining when a machine is quite human like, namely what is an human exactly? If you define being a human as being sociable with concrete contributions then perhaps the Turing test is not the best one but it's a starting point.
Security

+ - Computers makers fuel violence in Congo

Submitted by
JPLR
JPLR writes "A campaign group says western firms are fuelling violence in DR Congo by failing to check where their minerals come from. Coltan is mainly used in electronic devices. The same was also advocated since years by missionaries without anybody listening. For example countries like Congo and Uganda export Coltan without any Coltan mine on their territory. We are talking of millions of persons assassinated and even more raped in Congo, Rwanda since 15 years. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8159977.stm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coltan#Coltan_in_DR_Congo"
Space

+ - NASA needs a philosopher

Submitted by JPLR
JPLR (1404551) writes "From the moment the Soviets launched Sputnik I into orbit around the Earth in 1957, everybody looked upon the so-called space race as just one thing: a military contest. But physicists were quick to point out that nobody would choose space as a place from which to attack Earth. As a result, the space program has been killing time for 40 years with a series of orbital projects ... The purpose of those orbital projects has been mainly to keep the lights on at NASA. But there is no high purpose in those projects. And once more it is the late Wernher von Braun who comes up: At this moment, what remains the only solution to recovering NASA's true destiny, is of course... . http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/opinion/19wolfe.html"
Image

Study Finds Delinquent Behavior Among Boys Is "Contagious" 245

Posted by samzenpus
from the if-you-lie-down-with-dogs-you-will-get-up-with-fleas dept.
According to a new study, if everyone else was committing a crime, you would too, at least if you are a boy. The 20-year study showed what every grandmother could tell you; children from poor families, with inadequate supervision and bad friends were more likely to end up in juvenile court. What was more surprising is that exposure to the juvenile justice system seemed to increase the chance that the boy would engage in criminal activity as a young adult. "For boys who had been through the juvenile justice system, compared to boys with similar histories without judicial involvement, the odds of adult judicial interventions increased almost seven-fold," says study co-author Richard E. Tremblay.

Comment: Re:An interesting PR problem (Score 1) 173

by JPLR (#28725815) Attached to: NASA Releases Restored Apollo 11 Video, But Originals Lost
Are you sure the USSR saw it as a competition to go to the moon? If there was a competition, they never made that kind of statement to my knowledge. And there was not one single organisation in USSR to manage the Space business, and it was not supervised by the army or some similar extraordinary agency. Perhaps they were completly baffled by the NASA Space program as were many US scientists at that time: "Lee A. DuBridge, Presidential Science Advisor, expressed the scientists' viewpoint in congressional testimony on the FY 1970 NASA budget: "Nothing can do more harm to support for the space program than to have a series of missions for which there are no clear objectives"
Space

More First-Light Data From Herschel Space Telescope 21

Posted by kdawson
from the staring-at-gas dept.
davecl writes "First-light images and spectra have now been released for all three of the instruments on Herschel. (The first images came out a couple of weeks back.) The news is covered on the BBC, on the ESA website, on the Herschel mission blog, and elsewhere. The data all looks fantastic, and is especially impressive since the satellite was only launched about 7 weeks ago. I work on the SPIRE instrument and help maintain the blog; but even I am astounded by the amount of information in the SPIRE images."

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