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Comment: Re:Short black with one (Score 2) 192

by JLavezzo (#47245385) Attached to: How To Make Espresso In Space

Sorry, but this anecdote fails at explaining any cross cultural confusion. Was he buying something that wasn't milk? Your setting is Amsterdam, is this funny because he was buying drugs, not milk? Was he buying old milk because he didn't understand the expiration system? Is it funny that someone would have the expectation that a refrigerator would keep something fresh for more than 4 days? Is the joke that he thought milk that smelled like milk instead of an industrial product was 'off'? I'm genuinely interested in your insight here, especially because it earned a "5, Funny".

Comment: BlackBerry approved same as Knox (Score 2, Informative) 49

I don't understand how the takeaway from this is bad news for Blackberry. The same announcement that Samsung's Knox was approved said that Blackberry 10 is approved.
http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=119929
“We are pleased to add Blackberry 10 and the Samsung Knox version of Android to our family of mobile devices supporting the Department of Defense,” the spokesman said. “We look forward to additional vendors also participating in this process, further enabling a diversity of mobile devices for use within the department.”

Comment: Consultant or Manager (Score 1) 435

by JLavezzo (#38559876) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Re-Entering the Job Market As a Software Engineer?

Your experience makes you an ideal software manager. Coder, Teacher, Sales. You know what makes the clients tick. You know what makes the developers tick. You know how to get them to tick in sync. Don't apply for code monkey jobs. Apply for the jobs where the breadth of your experience will be an asset, where they'll know the team you're in charge of will make the right software the first time around.

Alternately, pick a concentration (Hadoop, for example would be very au currant), blog about it, put up some sample projects, call your self a consultant in your specialty, charge at least twice a reasonable rate and use your sales experience to get yourself a consulting gig. One gig leads to another. Also helpful: work up a couple presentations on your chosen specialty and try to convince someone to let you present to them on it (users groups, industry group, BeCamp meeting, tech conference). For extra bonus cash, read a few books on Software Architecture and add "Architect" to your title.

I don't know who the unemployed software engineers are. Possibly people living in the wrong town. I know no unemployed programmers. My office let go a few people, all of whom had new jobs lined up within 2 weeks. Of course, I mean actual software engineers who are experienced, productive, flexible, customer focused and able to have a conversation out loud with other people.

Comment: Re:Nothing New Here... (Score 2) 369

by JLavezzo (#35629328) Attached to: Using the Open Records Law To Intimidate Critics

> is that where we're at [as humanity], are we really that childish?
Yes. Pretty much always been this way. A few people manage to grow up and are often the ones involved in public discourse. The Enlightenment was a particularly successful period of time where enough adults got together to come up with some great new ideas.

Comment: Tinker Bell is an Engineer Now (Score 1) 298

by JLavezzo (#34699170) Attached to: Can Movies Inspire Kids To Be Future Scientists?

In Disney's 2008 "Tinker Bell" Tinker Bell is an engineer. She spends much of the movie fighting "her destiny" because, basically, the "tinkers" are not cool. The general theme though is that she has a powerful gift for engineering and that she should recognize that. The climax of the film is Tinker Bell frantically producing blueprints while schematics and equations float around her head. She saves the day, wins the admiration and respect of the community, her friends and her self. She also earns the privilege of participating in a group activity she though the was going to be excluded from because she wasn't cool.

Personally, it chokes me up a little bit to imagine 6 year old girls saying, "When I grow up I want to be an engineer just like Tinker Bell."

Firefox

Firefox Lorentz Keeps Plugin Crashes Under Control 115

Posted by timothy
from the pleasant-fantasy dept.
pastababa writes "A beta of the Firefox Lorentz project is now available for download and public testing. Eming reports Firefox 'Lorentz' provides uninterrupted browsing for Windows and Linux users when there is a crash in plugins. Plugins run in a separate process from the browser. If a plugin crashes it will not crash the browser, and unresponsive plugins are automatically restarted. The process-isolation feature has been in Google's Chrome from the beginning. Chrome sandboxes individual tabs, and the crash of one tab does not affect the running of the rest of Chrome browser. Firefox currently isolates only Adobe Flash, Apple Quicktime, and Microsoft Silverlight, but will eventually isolate all plugins running on a page. Mozilla encourages users to test Firefox 'Lorentz' on their favorite websites. Users who install Firefox 'Lorentz' will eventually be automatically updated to a future version of Firefox 3.6 in which this feature is included."

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