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Comment: Re:Funny (Score 1) 191

by JCHerbsleb (#47366959) Attached to: 30% of Americans Aren't Ready For the Next Generation of Technology

Wiki is a steaming pile of shit filled with inaccurate, biased, Face Painting Homer protected garbage.

Actually, according to Wiki, it is quite accurate! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Or, joking aside, according to CNET Wiki is more accurate than the Encyclopedia Britannica! http://news.cnet.com/Study-Wik...

Comment: Re:Wait a sec (Score 0, Flamebait) 772

by JCHerbsleb (#47107077) Attached to: Belief In Evolution Doesn't Measure Science Literacy
By definition evolution is a theory. While both sides argue the veracity of the claim; it has not been promoted to the level of law (in the sense of the law of gravity or the law of thermodynamics). With any theory; one must choose, ideally based upon a preponderance of evidence, to either believe or disbelieve. The scientists amongst us then take it a step further and attempt to validate that belief or disbelief through experiments based upon the scientific method.

Comment: Philosophy vs Substance (Score 2) 582

by JCHerbsleb (#46762911) Attached to: How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?
Open Source vs Closed Source is as much a philosophy as it is substance. We can argue the benefits of having many eyes on the code from Open Source as opposed to having funded coders with Closed Source. In the balance, each project will be different based upon its own unique factors. The one constant is that Open Source does have superior transparency.

+ - Federal Agency Data Breaches More Than Double Since 2009

Submitted by JCHerbsleb
JCHerbsleb (2881347) writes "The Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports via the Weekly Standard that Federal Data Breaches of Personally Identifiable Information (PII) have more than doubled since 2009. Given the increased quantity of data the government is holding both through new health care initiatives (Healthcare.Gov, Healthcare Data Hub, etc.) and through various NSA spying programs, this may spell greater risk to both individuals and businesses. Yahoo News confirms that not only have data breaches occured, but they have been handled poorly."

+ - USB Reversable Cable Images Emerge->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "A presentation released today by Intel revealed images of the USB 3.1 Type-C cable and connectors, which is symmetrical and will no longer require a user to correctly orient the plug. Initially, the USB 3.1 Type-C specification will support up to 10Gbps data transfer speeds. The Type-C connectors resemble those of Apple's Thunderbolt cabling in that they are much smaller than today's USB SuperSpeed connectors. The receptacle opening is 8.3mm x 2.5mm.The first iteration will have a 5 volt power transfer rate, but it is expected to deliver up to 100 watts for higher power applications in the future."
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+ - Researchers Cracked How to Make 'Invisibility Cloaks' the Size of a Fighter Jet->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "For all the disparate ongoing attempts to perfect stealth technology, it's still not possible to fully cloak an object from the naked eye.

Part of the problem, up until recently, has simply been a matter of scale. Scientists have known for years that metamaterials made from synthetic textiles can be used to to control the propagation of light. The artificial material bends light around an object, rendering it invisible to certain wavelengths. But, they could only fabricate the stuff in microscopic sizes.

Now, a team of researchers at the University of Central Florida, led by Debashis Chanda, have perfected a nanotransfer printing technique that makes it possible to create larger swaths of the metamaterial—about four by four inch squares. From there, multiple pieces can be stitched together with an automated tool to create a very large area of coverage, Chanda explained in an email."

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+ - Life without ICANN-> 2

Submitted by flagser
flagser (3601809) writes "Without ICANN, who controls domain names and mapping? That will be a new international organization who, at least at first, will leave unchanged ICANN policies. I think that is a good thing, because I believe that changes will come, and they will be at the expense of free speech.

So what about an alternative? We (I use the term affectionately here) came up with a distributed way to share files--bitTorrent. a distributed way to exchange money--bitCoin. Why not a distributed way to handle domain names? bitNames.

Tell me you haven't thought of this. Of course you have. We would need some kind of secure client engine that runs--probably as part of a network stack--and can then talk to a browser. Best case, it replaces your current stack and thus works with any browser/internet device. This would undoubtedly require some kind of IP hardcoding (v6 please)

Does this make any sense? I have not been able to find a project like this that anyone is working on. Is it really that difficult? Tell me how we get started. You, the smart guy in the back with the beard. Tell me what the first step is?"

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+ - Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Just the other day we read about how the Department of Transportation will require all manufacturers to include rearview cameras on all new cars produced after May 1, 2018. But there's something else auto manufacturers are pushing for, the ability to replace sideview mirrors with cameras in 2018. Tesla in particular is pushing for this to happen as traditional mirrors are bulky, and not very aerodynamic. That lump of plastic can cause surprising amounts of drag on an otherwise smooth car body. Camera units are much smaller and can be made streamlined, or even mounted nearly flush with the body, thus reducing aerodynamic drag. The idea has been around since the 1990s, and many concept cars have used cameras instead of sideview mirrors for years. But how will NHTSA respond? Is it finally time to ditch the sideview mirror?"

+ - Yes, the CIO still matters -- but the balance of power is shifting->

Submitted by mattydread23
mattydread23 (2793761) writes "There's been a lot of hubbub about a recent Gartner study suggesting that marketing officers will control more technology spending than CIOs by 2017. A Forrester researcher debunks that claim, but admits that users and business units have more control and influence than ever before. The old days of vendors bribing CIOs with golf games, and CIOs shoving shelfware down their employees' throats, are happily coming to an end, leaving plenty of opportunity for upstarts."
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+ - EU court of justice decides in favour of linking to copyrighted material->

Submitted by Bart Smit
Bart Smit (3391975) writes "In a case brought by a Swedish newspaper against an aggregation site, the court decided for the defendant, making linking to copyrighted material legal in the EU. The reasoning was that offering the link does not open the copyrighted material to a new audience; the original copyright holder had already opened the material up to Internet users."
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+ - Europe Considers Wholesale Savings Confiscation, Enforced Redistribution-> 1

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Everything that the depositors and citizens of Cyprus had to live through, may be on the verge of going continental. In a nutshell, and in Reuters' own words, "the savings of the European Union's 500 million citizens could be used to fund long-term investments to boost the economy and help plug the gap left by banks since the financial crisis, an EU document says." What is left unsaid is that the "usage" will be on a purely involuntary basis, at the discretion of the "union", and can thus best be described as confiscation."
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+ - Let's Finance College With a Tax on All Graduates

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "As the number of students attending colleges and universities has steadily increased and the cost for most students has climbed even faster, student debt figures (both total and per person) have continued to get bigger. Now Josh Freedman at Forbes Magazine proposes a graduate tax-funded system of higher education, under which students would pay nothing to attend college upfront. Instead, once they graduate and move out of their parents’ basements, they would begin to pay an additional income tax (say, for example, three percent) on their earnings that would fund higher education. "In other words, the current crop of college graduates funds the current crop of college students, and so on down the line. There is no debt taken on by students, which minimizes risk (good); repayment is tied to income, because only people who make income pay the tax (also good); and it is simpler and more easily administrable than plans to make loans easier to pay off (still good)." The main argument for a graduate tax comes from its progressivity. Supporters of a graduate tax point out that most college graduates, particularly those from elite universities that use a greater share of resources, are richer than people who have not graduated from college. The state of Oregon made headlines last year for an innovative proposal called “Pay It Forward” to fund higher education without having students take on any debt. Pay It Forward amounts to a graduate tax: All of the graduates of public colleges in Oregon would pay nothing up front in tuition but would pay back a percentage of their income for a set number of years. These payments would build a fund that would cover the cost for future students to receive the same opportunity to attend college with no upfront costs. "As pressure mounts for more students from all backgrounds to attend college, it will become increasingly difficult to try to stem the rapid tuition inflation under a loan system," concludes Freedman. "Our current student loan system has made college more expensive, turned higher education into an individual, rather than a communal, good, and generated serious negative economic and social risks.""

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