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Comment: Re:Bullshit. (Score 2) 127

by J. T. MacLeod (#46630623) Attached to: State Colleges May Offer Best ROI On Comp Sci Degrees

> The MIT or Harvard, for a degree in Computer Science doesn't offer you superior education, it just looks nice on your resume.

Computer Science is severely improving in many universities, but the top-tier univeristies for Computer Science really do provide a CS education that's a step above what's available in most places.

This isn't liberal arts where it's money and alumni politics. Berkeley, MIT, Stanford, Carnagie Mellon, and Harvard have *fantastic* undergraduate education for computing and engineering. There are a good number of state schools that have become comparable, but they've earned their reputation for a good reason.

This comes from someone without a degree.

Comment: Re: It doesn't cost any more to serve more data (Score 1) 479

by J. T. MacLeod (#46014635) Attached to: An Iowa ISP's Metered Pricing: What Will the Market Bear?

I'm not sure if you can get a 100 Mbps link for $45/mth, but you definitely can get a 1000Mbps link for $450.

Transit is so cheap these days that it's almost free; it's very cheap, keeps getting cheaper, while many other costs are not getting any cheaper (electricity prices don't ever seem to go down, for example). As a result, transit seems to be making up a smaller and smaller percentage of costs.

I agree with you on the general principle involved here (and the pricing scheme being discussed here is nonsensical), but transit is only that cheap at major junctions. When you get farther away, it gets much more expensive. Additionally, in rural areas, fewer customers have to support cost of the backhaul infrastructure to make it out that far (and trying to economize .

It gets expensive for rural customers on both levels.

Comment: It worked out well for me. (Score 1) 285

As a kid, my mother's record collection introduced me to music from her past, and Nick at Night introduced me to television from her era. Shared culture is an ongoing story, and being able to see the earlier parts of that story really helped me to be able to appreciate the later parts. As well, understanding a medium from its simplest implementation to its most complex helps to create a more informed taste.

I don't have children yet, but my little brother is about 25 years younger than me. I've introduced him to old video games that are accessible to him. He loves them, and he's building experiences that will allow him greater appreciation of things he's going to run into later.

If my future children take an interest in technology, I won't force them to use an old PC... but I will certainly drag one out and set it up for them to fiddle with!

Comment: Re:Scam (Score 5, Informative) 148

by J. T. MacLeod (#40760985) Attached to: Amazon Offers To Help Train Workers For Other Jobs

Did you even read the article?

It's not a diploma mill. Amazon is funding tuition for any accredited school, as long as the coursework is in the list of in-demand fields. There aren't kickbacks (Although if there were, so what? It would just mean it's not as generous, not that it's a scam.).

Amazon is also willing to pay for 95% of the cost, up to their annual limit. At a community college, that will generally cover everything. There is no saddling anyone with ridiculous debt.

This is a genuinely good program. There is no scam or any taking advantage of anyone. How did you even invent this in your imagination?

Comment: Re:uhhh... (Score 1) 1027

by J. T. MacLeod (#40335133) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's Your Beef With Windows Phone?

The single top menu has a great deal of functionality in it by design.

Targets in the middle of your screen are harder to find and harder to hit. You don't have a problem? Well, it isn't HARD. It's just hardER. Losing per-window menus was one thing I was not looking forward to when I started using OS X. As it turns out, those little savings in effort are worth it. It's easier this way for most things, and clicking on an application to bring its menu up is a far smaller loss than the gains.

It also saves vertical space since *every* application doesn't have to display its menu 100% of the time. Small loss, bigger gain.

Comment: Re:Damn! (Score 1) 1165

by J. T. MacLeod (#40318185) Attached to: Blocking Gun Laws With Patents

You aren't AWARE of any, presumably because of willing ignorance. Quick searches on Google return numerous results of gun defense stories in news. Many of them involve people going to their cars to get their guns and then going back. Imagine how much faster they could have responded if they'd had their guns with them instead of respecting the "gun free zone" like the attacker didn't. If you're a coward, fine, but stop projecting on decent people.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearl_High_School_shooting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_School_of_Law_shooting
How about a site that links media reports with legal firearm use thwarting crime? http://www.goodguyswin.org/

There are plenty such stories out there. Many MORE such tales don't hit the public radar, because that's not as catching a story as when innocent people die. Media outlets often "fail" to report if guns were used when ordinary citizens stop crime. It makes sense why the average person wouldn't be aware of such things. What makes less sense is why someone who would spout off an opinion wouldn't even make half an effort to research.

Comment: Re:Why does Apple hate America? (Score 1) 599

by J. T. MacLeod (#39838323) Attached to: How Apple Sidesteps Billions In Global Taxes

Can it really be called "fat cats getting fatter" when they are stacking cash up and not paying it to individuals? If it is a business saving cash, that value is actually being used (giving the company liquidity and leverage to do business or STAY in business) or will be used. Both of which are typically good for the economy.

Of course, when taxing corporations is the method to raise funds for the states, people have no idea how much tax they're really paying since it's hidden in the cost of what they buy.

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