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Comment: Re:I hate xcode 4 (Score 1) 72

by Invid72 (#36563688) Attached to: Apple Releases iOS 5 Beta 2 For Developers

When I have errors in my code, or places in the code that produces warnings, I like my IDE to move the cursor to the actual line of code where the issue is.

This used to work just fine in xcode 3, but I'll be damned if I can figure out how to replicate that behaviour in xcode 4. What I've always had to do is switch window panes to look at the error log, find the line number where the issue is, and then manually go there in that file.

What's wrong with clicking the error / warning icon in the navigation pane? It shows me my warning, I click the warning and it shows the appropriate file with the offending line highlighted in yellow. Click the warning again, and it will pulse the warning highlight in your source again, no line hunting necessary.

Is your complaint that Xcode just doesn't reposition your cursor? The highlight and caret where the warning occurs isn't enough?

Comment: Re:"As the WebP image format exists currently, (Score 1) 262

by Invid72 (#36241752) Attached to: Mozilla Rejects WebP Image Format, Google Adds It
And when Google drops support for h.264 I'll drop Chrome if I can't find a plugin. That's the reason that I switched to Chrome from Firefox too, though I'm not the same poster as the AC above.

I got tired of having my Linux boxes struggle to playback flash videos, and went looking for a browser with HTML5 video support using a codec that anyone gives a damn about (read as h.264). Chrome saved me from Flash on Linux and OS X and ended Mozilla's reign as my browser provider of choice going back to Phoenix days.

All Mozilla's stance has amounted to today is to force me back to using Flash again for everything beside Youtube video. Quite frankly, I'm interested in a pragmatic solution, not burning my legs to make a point about software patents or whatever Mozilla's justification for their obstinance is now.

That said, I agree with their stance on this WebP issue. There's no good reason to continue to pitch battles when the war's already been won by JPEG. It's just a shame that they can't see that h.264 has already won the battle for video and just hook into the OS-provided media frameworks. I'd like to use Firefox again.

Comment: Re:"None" is better than inconsistent? (Score 4, Insightful) 657

by Invid72 (#33458360) Attached to: Flash On Android Is 'Shockingly Bad'

I'd rather not have the option myself. Having Flash available is a disincentive to creating a better HTML5 experience suitable for mobile devices. With Flash available, mobile site developers can just create their sites and call it a day, regardless of how poor the experience is.

Not having the fallback means that you have no alternative but to create suitable code in order to reach mobile users. Since Flash for whatever reason already encourages lazy development, it would be better that the option didn't exist at all.

Jobs' obstinance, coupled with iOS marketshare will lead to a better mobile browsing experience for all of us, at least that's my take.

Comment: Re:Bad Form Factor (Score 1) 167

by Invid72 (#32469990) Attached to: Hands-On With Dell's Streak Android Device

...If you need performance, but still want your app to work on a variety of phones, you need to do more legwork.

Apple doesn't actually have a solution to this problem, they're just protected because they only make a handful of devices.

Limiting themselves to just a handful of devices IS their solution, along with abstracting away the minor hardware differences behind robust API calls.

Comment: Re:You signed away this "right" by picking Apple. (Score 1) 850

by Invid72 (#32118216) Attached to: Flash Is Not a Right

I want what the iPhone should have been, and what Android still has a chance of becoming. That is not going to happen if all of us just sit down, shut up, and let Apple take all the marketshare. There absolutely is a PR battle to be fought over this, and I am going to continue to warn people away from walled gardens as long as they will listen, until the only people left in those gardens are their creators.

You need to get over yourself and realize that computing is bigger than just the desires of developers and geeks. What most of those who rail against walled gardens studiously avoid addressing is the simple fact that Apples succeeds by addressing the needs of people who are neglected by traditional computing. To wit:

My 60 yo mother doesn't want what "the iPhone should have been, and what Android still has a chance of being."

She wants to read a book and surf the web. She doesn't want to have to decide whether the Droid version of FBReader will run on her tablet, or wonder why the x86 version of her favourite PopCap game won't run on her ARM tablet either.

She's no fool, but good luck trying to convince her that she's better off in a situation where she needs to know what an ISA is or why it's important, or any of the other things happening in the largely uncontrolled Android market.

Most important, and more to the point: My mother will never research to find out that her program won't run in the background because Adobe hasn't gotten around to updating it's development tools to leverage the new iPhone APIs yet. All she knows is that the shit Apple sold her doesn't work.

Apple will continue to succeed as long as they prioritize the user experience, even if it's to the detriment of developers. There are a lot of non-technical users out there and they have money to spend.

Comment: Re:My Thoughts (Score 4, Insightful) 282

by Invid72 (#32058810) Attached to: Flash Support Confirmed For Android 2.2
You are confusing Flash lite, a limited subset of Flash with "Full Flash" in Adobe parlance, which is coming with 10.1. No shipping smartphone save the Nokia N900 ships with a full featured Flash runtime.

The Maemo plugin is a sluggish performer from what I've heard too. Adobe really needs to hit the Flash 10.1 for Android release out of the park, or risk validating all of Jobs' criticisms.

"A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." -- William James

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