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Comment: WPA2 not an option (Score 2) 884

by Innovative1 (#42960069) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With an Advanced Wi-Fi Leech?
Those of you recommending a long randomly generated WPA2 password need to RTFA. He has been hacked via the WPS vulnerability. Once you have obtained the WPS pin you have permanent access into that router and have the ability to retrieve the WPA2 password in plaintext every time that he changes it. The pin cannot be changed. Depending on the router you may or may not be able to disable WPS. Next time buy a router that has the option to disable WPS and TURN IT OFF. Over 12 million routers are now exploitable via this hack and have been for quite some time. The exparrot option or sniffing his traffic are the best options.

Comment: This is common (Score 2) 291

by Innovative1 (#42164957) Attached to: Should Inventions Be Automatically Owned By Your Employer?
When you are hired to work for Radio Shack they make you sign an agreement that ANY inventions that you come up with while employed by them are their property. They also state that any future inventions that MAY have been thought up during your time working for Radio Shack also belong to them. This includes your own time. This is any invention during the employment period and any time in the future.

Comment: Sometimes it makes a difference (Score 1) 664

by Innovative1 (#36663388) Attached to: Retailer Calls Rivals' Bluff On "HDMI Scam"
I have a 30' HDMI cable fished through my wall and crawlspace from my basement to my TV. My receiver said I needed to use 'High-Speed' cables and I was like BS! However, I was plagued by black screen and intermittent video for weeks. I finally purchased a 'High-Speed with Ethernet' cable and have not seen the problem since. Granted, I still got the first 30' for $12 and the second for $20 on E-Bay so I am not paying those crazy prices. When running over long distances through a distribution device such as a receiver it seems to me that there is some merit to the high-speed claim.

Comment: Same 30 step process they have been requiring for (Score 1) 1

by Innovative1 (#36624174) Attached to: MySpace won't let users delete their accounts
Thanks for contacting Myspace. If you really want to delete your profile, here's what you do: 1. Log into Myspace 2. Hover over My Stuff (in the upper nav bar) and click Edit Profile 3. Remove all the content from the text boxes and type REMOVE PROFILE in the About Me text box (this way we know you have access to your profile) 4. Reply to this email, leaving the subject line intact, and tell us to delete your profile (be sure to include the URL that appears in the http:/// browser bar when you visit your profile and click on your main profile photo, which will look like http://profile.myspace.com/...viewprofile&friendid=000000) Once we receive your email, we’ll delete your profile for you. Important stuff to know: - deletion is permanent, so you might want to consider hiding your profile instead (see below)! - you can preserve your profile, playlists, and photos, yet limit others’ ability to view them, by deleting all of your friends and setting your profile privacy to “Only my friends.” This way you can still enjoy cool features like Myspace Music and Video - if you decide to delete your profile, it will take a few days before your profile is completely erased from our system, during which time you may still receive notifications, so be patient. We're working on it! Sincerely, The Myspace Support team Customer
Social Networks

+ - MySpace won't let users delete their accounts-> 1

Submitted by Innovative1
Innovative1 (1396647) writes "Since MySpace just sold to Specific Media I decided to delete my account, since I haven't used it for years anyway. To my surprise it is not only complicated but (seemingly) intentionally broken...and has been for months. According to their Twitter account they are aware of this 'bug' and have been for months. Check the link for a detailed breakdown of the cancellation process and the comments of many angry users."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Bad Idea (Score 1) 629

by Innovative1 (#28928747) Attached to: RadioShack To Rebrand As "The Shack"?
I can see why they would do this. When I worked there people used to complain all the time that it is still called Radio Shack even though they really do not carry radios anymore. Back in the day it was a great store for car stereos and ham radio enthusiasts. Now they cater to neither. However, rebranding will likely hurt them more than help. Perhaps instead of rebranding they should once again stock some radios. They still have a ton of people who come in there looking for them.

Comment: Only Shielded-grounded cables (Score 1) 837

by Innovative1 (#27739157) Attached to: Handmade vs. Commercially Produced Ethernet Cables
We only use shielded cable with shielded RJ-45 ends. I have never seen these commercially made and I would guess that they are super expensive. Without grounded and shielded wire we experienced way more outages due to lightning and power surges and our APs would often lose sync due to RF interference bleeding through the wires. So I would absolutely only ever use my own personally made cables. In the past we just used cheap patch cables and they worked alright but we have had way less issues with cables that we have made.

Comment: Cat-5 Replacement (Score 1) 524

by Innovative1 (#27670269) Attached to: Should Network Cables Be Replaced?
If it is ran outdoors it will need to be replaced as even the UV rated stuff has a rating of about 5-10 years. Indoors the same applies but it will last for much longer because it will be exposed to less UV. Otherwise as long as it isn't being moved around or stepped on or put under strain which could cause it to break it should be fine.

Comment: System Requirements?? (Score 1) 695

by Innovative1 (#27663353) Attached to: Windows 7 Starter Edition — 3 Apps Only
So I take it that they are keeping the '1GB' of RAM requirement that vista claimed? Even though it took over 600MB just to run. Vista ended up practically worthless on all of those notebooks and end-users had to wade through a plethora of online forums just to 'downgrade' to WinXP since the manufacturers all claimed that the laptops did not support that OS. WinXP was an upgrade if you ask me. Lets just hope that we don't get a bunch of 1GB Win7 laptops flooding the market. This three app limitation seems like their (terrible) answer to that issue to me.

Comment: WISP Throttling (Score 2, Interesting) 395

by Innovative1 (#27559377) Attached to: ISP Capping Is Becoming the New DRM
I work for a large WISP and it is impossible to offer everyone unlimited bandwidth all the time. The advertised packages are peak that the system can handle and are rarely the continued throughput. We keep a close eye on our bandwidth and upgrade backhauls whenever necessary but throttling is a necessary evil. The way it works here is you can download a certain amount per day and then you are throttled to 2Mb (depending on the plan), download a certain amount more and it goes to 512K, then 256K. Then it resets at midnight. There is also a monthly cap that will throttle you to 256K for the remainder of the month if you hit that amount. We recently did a company wide bandwidth analysis and found that usage has been increasing for every aspect of user over the years so we have raised our limits. Now we figure that 99% of our customers will never experience throttling. That other 1% are usually pirates and torrent hounds and if they want an unlimited pipe then they can go elsewhere and get it because it is not our intent to provide unlimited service to those types. I happen to be one of those types and I can say that the service is not for me. However, it is all that is available in my area so I have to live with it. We have an unlimited 4Mb business plan which runs about $450 a month if people want it but most people would prefer the standard 2Mb or 7Mb packages (for $30 & $35 per month). The terms are clear for anyone who wants to read them and nobody who knows the cost of operating a network like this can realistically expect an unlimited 7Mb connection for $35.00 a month. Before throttling was implemented the 1% of the users who use most of the bandwidth would slow down the network so that the other 99% could almost not use it. VOIP services especially suffered. So really it might suck for that 1% of people who run torrents 24 hours a day but that is not our target demographic.

Comment: BS (Score 1) 859

by Innovative1 (#27512021) Attached to: CFLs Causing Utility Woes
All I know is that I have reduced my power bill from over $100 mo. to $53.00 mo. It is hard to argue with results. Also, if the utility company really pushes out that much more (28w) then you can bet that Incandescents also use slightly more 'equivalent' power than advertised. Either way we are consuming less power, which helps everyone. Someone at the Incandescent plant has been putting money into this researchers pocket if you ask me.

Little known fact about Middle Earth: The Hobbits had a very sophisticated computer network! It was a Tolkien Ring...

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