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Comment: Re:iMac with Retina display. (Score 1) 353

by Iniamyen (#48170673) Attached to: Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More
My point is that It's easier to do the math myself, for my own application. All that "retina" tells me is that the resolution is above MxN threshold, assuming some distance. What if the distance in my particular application is different than that assumed for the "retina" terminology? Just tell me how many damn pixels the thing has so I can figure out if it will work for my application!

Comment: Re:iMac with Retina display. (Score 1) 353

by Iniamyen (#48162355) Attached to: Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More
So this means that any display touted as "retina" would depend on the distance from the eye to the display, right? Meaning, the diagonal measurement + "retina" requires another piece of data to know how many pixels are on the damn thing.

I could claim that my old VGA display is "retina" if I don't need to specify the viewing distance, right?

Comment: Re:Just tell me (Score 1) 463

by Iniamyen (#48149833) Attached to: Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker
I'm not speaking as a nurse, but from what I understand, it's tough to have that attitude towards your "career" when you don't get paid what you deserve, and your job is more about dealing with the fact that your employer wants to be as cheap as possible in every regard, rather than providing care to patients. Honestly, I think a major outbreak in the US would be a good thing because it might make people think more about the value that they assign to the people actually doing most of the work caring for them when they go to the doctor's office.

Comment: Re:So does scratching your nose (Score 2) 208

by Iniamyen (#48086073) Attached to: Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers
You originally said "listening to the radio."

If you are now talking about tuning the radio, I would argue that it's far more distracting. You are actually taking your attention off of driving, and using it to turn the knob, decide if you like the next station, continue tuning, etc... It's an active task. It's not a passive task. Just because we have trouble defining "active" and "passive" in real-world use cases doesn't mean that we shouldn't try.

Comment: Re:So does scratching your nose (Score 1) 208

by Iniamyen (#48083485) Attached to: Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers
I'm too lazy to Google yet another reference to a study, but what you said is just not true. Something like listening to the radio is very passive and requires minimal attention. Talking on a cell phone requires you to form thoughts and sentences, which means you aren't paying attention to the task of driving during these periods. They are just not the same.

Comment: Re:So.. (Score 4, Insightful) 208

by Iniamyen (#48083379) Attached to: Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers
On a related note, it's been shown again and again that you can't really do more than one higher-level brain task at once. So even the people that are very very good at switching rapidly between operating a cell phone and driving are still not really doing both at the same time.

So they aren't actually performing the task of driving while they are preoccupied with their cell phone. They may as well be asleep during those periods.

Comment: Re:Expert. (Score 1) 358

by Iniamyen (#47994587) Attached to: U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music'
You're creating a straw man argument out of something that had nothing to do with my original point - which was that you don't need a "good ear" to do what you said was Dr. Dre's area of expertise. I guarantee that as a producer, Dr. Dre's job responsibilities do not include "[evaluating] the results of different parametric curves on tone signature." That's it.

Comment: Re:Expert. (Score 1) 358

by Iniamyen (#47993749) Attached to: U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music'
I'll assume you're being sarcastic. Yes, a lot of common quality issues with YouTube videos could probably be solved by some fully-automated post-processing. In cases where the problem is obvious enough that you can detect it by listening to it, I'd argue that an untrained 5-year old could also detect the issue (i.e., you don't need a "good ear.")

Comment: Re:Expert. (Score 2) 358

by Iniamyen (#47947403) Attached to: U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music'
Any mention of "good ear" with respect to physically measurable quantities, means that you're either woefully ignorant or trolling.

A "good ear" with respect to what's popular, or what might market well, that's one thing. But what you actually said is just elitist audiophile bullshit.

It is better to give than to lend, and it costs about the same.

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