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Comment: Really? (Score 3, Interesting) 126

by InfiniteZero (#47957369) Attached to: Is Alibaba Comparable To a US Company?

> a complex fabric of personal, corporate and government organization relationships

Are we talking about China, or America? At that high level, the line between corporations and the government becomes blurry, no matter which country you live in. Just look at Standard Oil, Boeing, Halliburton... The list goes on.

Comment: Re:And well they should. (Score 2) 79

by InfiniteZero (#47801237) Attached to: China Gives Microsoft 20 Days To Respond To Competition Probe

Liability not in the sense of suing someone, but in the sense that you won't be liable and your ass is safe.

Say you are the CIO of a company. If you pick MS and something goes wrong, you can shift the blame onto MS. If you pick OSS and something goes wrong, well, the blame will be on you.

Hence the old adage: nobody ever got fired for buying IBM.

Comment: It Changes with Age (Score 3, Insightful) 346

by InfiniteZero (#44920353) Attached to: My favorite season:

When I was a restless kid with unlimited energy, it was summer hands down. The seemingly endless summer break, the adventures, the DIY projects...

Now it's autumn. As an adult you appreciate the subtlety and richness under the unassuming quietness of the falling leaves.

I suppose in a few decades when the prospect of graveyard starts to manifest over the horizon, I will find the allure of winter.

Interestingly enough, there is a parallel in my favorite color over the years.

Comment: All Science is Computer Science (Score 1) 237

by InfiniteZero (#44307263) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Scientific Research Positions For Programmers?

All Science is computer science nowadays, and I'm not even a computer scientist. So yes, there are many fields that are in great need of computer scientists and/or programmers. For example this guy, who popularized the term "connectome":

http://hebb.mit.edu/people/seung/

And BTW, his excellent TED talk:

http://www.ted.com/talks/sebastian_seung.html

Comment: Liability (Score 3, Insightful) 372

by InfiniteZero (#44266997) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Postgres On Par With Oracle?

When you work for a big corp. and have the money to burn, it's all about shifting liability to a 3rd party -- the bigger, the better, hence the saying, nobody ever gets fired for buying IBM.

In turn, with the money you pay them, a big 3rd party will more than likely throw all the man power at your problem until it gets fixed.

+ - Physicists show self-correcting quantum computers are theoretically possible->

Submitted by InfiniteZero
InfiniteZero (587028) writes "From the article at phys.org:

Using exotic components such as color codes, new phases of quantum matter, and extra dimensions, a team of physicists has shown that it's theoretically possible to construct a quantum computer that has the ability to correct itself whenever an error occurs.

"The greatest significance of our work is showing that self-correcting quantum computing at a finite temperature is not impossible as a matter of principle," physicist Héctor Bombin told Phys.org. Bombin was at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts, while performing the study and is currently at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario. "In fact, the original motivation came from claims to the contrary by other authors. We provide explicit constructions that can be checked directly, without numerical simulations.""

Link to Original Source

+ - How to (or NOT to) Train Your Job Replacement? 3

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I am a contract developer from a major U.S. city. My rate has never been the lowest, nonetheless very competitive considering the speed and quality of the work I have always delivered, as well as the positive feedbacks I've got from most clients. In the past ~3 years I have been working on a sizable project for a major client. For most part it has been a happy arrangement for both parties. However for various reasons (including the still ailing economy), starting this year they hired a fresh college graduate in-house, and asked me to teach him all "secrets" of my code, even though they have the source code by contract. The implicit (although never openly stated) goal is of course for him to take over the project and hopefully reduce cost, at least in the short-term. I say "hopefully" because I am pretty sure that, unfamiliar with the software industry, they underestimated what it takes to make quality, production-ready code. I am not afraid of losing this particular client as I have many others, but I want to ask Slashdot, how do you handle this type of situation — train someone who you know will eventually replace you at your job?"

Comment: Re:Dammit, Texas! (Score 1) 277

by InfiniteZero (#43109597) Attached to: Texas Bills Would Bar Warrantless Snooping On Phone Location

I've lived in Houston for 15 years. I think it has something to do with Texas' root of being a "Lone Star" state in the Union, i.e., we used to be our own country -- the Republic of Texas. And a lot of people here are still proud of that root to this day.

So whenever the federal government starts to impose some draconian policy over the entire nation, Texans have the natural tendency of saying, FU, not here in Texas. And I suspect if/when things got out of hand and a new revolution were ever needed, it might just possibly start in Texas.

Comment: Probably Won't Help Much (Score 0) 217

by InfiniteZero (#43102237) Attached to: MIT's Charm School For Geeks Turns 20

I suspect the reason most nerds are bad at social etiquette simply because they don't see the point and don't care. It's a waste of time and/or something beneath their intellectual pursuits. If you are on the verge of a breakthrough in a new black hole theory, or revolutionary AI algorithm, everything else might seem unimportant by comparison.

If they started caring, picking up proper social etiquette is really not that hard. You don't need a school a class or an instructional manual... Just mirror whatever other "smooth" and "cool" people are doing. (The hard part is to hold an engaging social conversation talking about nothing, but that's a story for another day.)

So the key is to convince the nerd of the importance of social etiquette. Ironically, those who do go to this school probably don't really need it, and those who really need it haven't realized what they are missing... but sooner or later, they will do.

The biggest mistake you can make is to believe that you are working for someone else.

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