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Comment: Sounds like a solid theory (Score 1) 161

by InfiniteBlaze (#46315743) Attached to: The Neuroscience of Computer Programming
Programming languages are very much like spoken languages. If you understand the origin language, or have an innate ability to infer meaning, it is possible to naturally understand a new programming language. I studied C++ in high school, so Java and C# are familiar and easily understood. The structures make sense, and if I don't immediately know offhand what something does, I can infer from the surrounding code. The same holds true for spoken languages. English is my first language, and I studied German in school. I never formally studied any other languages because that wasn't my passion. My passion was working with computers. However, I can generally infer the meaning of spoken Spanish in the same way I would deduce the function of unfamiliar code. I look for parts I recognize, use them to help decide what the unfamiliar portion means, and test my guess.

Comment: Re:Why... (Score 1) 106

by InfiniteBlaze (#44715749) Attached to: Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs
That's counter-intuitive. "Running processes" on data does not make the data travel faster. If using compression improves speed, there is a bottleneck somewhere that allows the data to pool in cache. When the interface reaches the speeds that eliminate the bottleneck, we'll really have some fast drives.

Comment: Why... (Score 2) 106

by InfiniteBlaze (#44715595) Attached to: Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs
would I want to use compression at all, if my goal is speed? If maximizing total capacity is not the concern, I would use none of the drive for compression. I think the point to be taken from this is that Intel is recognizing that storage capacities for SSDs are reaching the point where compression is no longer necessary to make the technology a viable alternative to mechanical drives, and we will now begin seeing the true speed potential of the technology.
Businesses

The Twighlight of Small In-House Data Centers 180

Posted by samzenpus
from the say-goodnight dept.
dcblogs writes "Virtualization, cloud services and software-as-a-service (SaaS) is making it much easier to shift IT infrastructure operations to service providers, and that is exactly what many users are doing. Of the new data center space being built in the U.S., service providers accounted for about 13% of it last year, but by 2017 they will be responsible for more than 30% of this new space, says IDC. 'We are definitely seeing a trend away from in-house data centers toward external data centers, external provisioning,' said Gartner analyst Jon Hardcastle. Among those planning for a transition is the University of Kentucky's CIO, who wants to reduce his data center footprint by half to two thirds. He expects in three to five years service provider pricing models 'will be very attractive to us and allow us to take most of our computing off of our data center.' IT managers says a big reason for the shift is IT pros don't want to work in data centers at small-to-mid size firms that can't offer them a career path. Hank Seader, managing principal of the Uptime Institute, said that it takes a 'certain set of legacy skills, a certain commitment to the less than glorious career fields to make data centers work, and it's hard to find people to do it.'"
Power

Solar Impulse Airplane To Launch First Sun-Powered Flight Across America 89

Posted by samzenpus
from the guided-by-the-light dept.
First time accepted submitter markboyer writes "The Solar Impulse just landed at Moffett Field in Mountain View, California to announce a journey that will take it from San Francisco to New York without using a single drop of fuel. The 'Across America' tour will kick off this May when founders Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg take off from San Francisco. From there the plane will visit four cities across the states before landing in New York."
Mars

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-a-look dept.
SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."
Firefox

Emscripten and New Javascript Engine Bring Unreal Engine To Firefox 124

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the cycle-is-nearly-complete dept.
MojoKid writes "There's no doubt that gaming on the Web has improved dramatically in recent years, but Mozilla believes it has developed new technology that will deliver a big leap in what browser-based gaming can become. The company developed a highly-optimized version of Javascript that's designed to 'supercharge' a game's code to deliver near-native performance. And now that innovation has enabled Mozilla to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the browser. As a sort of proof of concept, Mozilla debuted this BananaBread game demo that was built using WebGL, Emscripten, and the new JavaScript version called 'asm.js.' Mozilla says that it's working with the likes of EA, Disney, and ZeptoLab to optimize games for the mobile Web, as well." Emscripten was previously used to port Doom to the browser.
Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the bending-the-rules dept.
Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"

Everything that can be invented has been invented. -- Charles Duell, Director of U.S. Patent Office, 1899

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