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Comment: Re:Heat gun (Score 1) 304

by InfiniteBlaze (#48759007) Attached to: Putting a MacBook Pro In the Oven To Fix It
I'm sorry, but you're highly unlikely to be able to see that deeply under a cpu or gpu, given that when they're soldered on they're usually 5 or 6 rows of solder points deep. Trying to see that far under the chip from the edge of the board would be a nightmare, especially since you'd need to see all sides of each and every joint.

Comment: Re:Heat gun (Score 1) 304

by InfiniteBlaze (#48699025) Attached to: Putting a MacBook Pro In the Oven To Fix It
No. No. Unequivocally no. Do not attempt to repair cracked solder joints using a heat gun. The movement of the air will shift the chip when the solder melts, and will likely cause bridges which will short the chip and destroy it. The oven is much safer; there is at least no air movement. However, the safest method for repairing this requires an x-ray machine, as there is no other way to safely check the solder joints.

Comment: IT is tough like that... (Score 1) 2

by InfiniteBlaze (#47583997) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: IT Personnel as Ostriches?
Tech pros have access to essentially everything. We have to know the ins and outs of every piece of software, have access to everyone's user accounts, and access to all storage locations. Because of that, we have to maintain strict confidentiality. It's best to keep that information to yourself, educate users on best practices, and ensure that proper procedures for security are followed.

Comment: Re:Good Sign (Score 5, Informative) 176

by InfiniteBlaze (#47135267) Attached to: Congressman Introduces Bill To Limit FCC Powers
Exactly which cable company is NOT providing telephone service these days? They're telecoms now, plain and simple. The skirt around regulations by claiming "different technology", but it serves the same purpose, and seems like the same thing to the general public. It would seem you're against strict regulation. What will keep telecommunications providers from inspecting every packet that crosses their wires and holding up smaller businesses for protectio...I mean, transit fees? If I pay for 50Mbps bandwidth, and Netflix pays their provider for 50Tbps of bandwidth, but Comcast decides they should be making more money, what stops them from throttling Netflix traffic in exchange for more money? Streaming a video might take...2-3Mbps, right? The number crunchers at Comcast, though, see that Netflix traffic on their network takes up some 50%+ of the total traffic, and they want to ride the gravy train. So, they'll hold up Netflix for more dough, and Netflix will pass on the upcharge to their customers - making Netflix look like the bad guy to people who don't understand how it all works. Shady stuff, man, and we shouldn't give that kind of power to Comcast or At&t or anyone else.

HOLY MACRO!

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