Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:hmm.. (Score 1) 571

by IndustrialComplex (#48153069) Attached to: Lockheed Claims Breakthrough On Fusion Energy Project

You can build something to test a concept fairly easily. However, it will not be designed with economic operation in mind. When you build an operational prototype, you are going to spend a lot more time developing the design into one that can easily be developed into a production system. That means a LOT more engineering effort is expended into 'mundane' things like ensuring that you aren't using components which fail in an unreasonable amount of time, or that your design is maintainable. Imagine if they designed a prototype, only to discover that some aspect of it was a maintenance nightmare that couldn't be fixed without a redesign of the system. That would be expensive.

In short, the 1 year version proves that it can be built, the 5 year version proves that it can be built in a manner for real world use.

Comment: Re:No mention on capacity though (Score 1) 395

Maybe he meant a battery in the classical sense of energy storage. By that token a hydroelectric dam could be considered a giant battery with the capability to output 100kW/hr...

(Or I have a bad habit of trying to see the silver lining in thunderheads)

Comment: Re:Why..... (Score 1) 259

by IndustrialComplex (#48149243) Attached to: "Double Irish" Tax Loophole Used By US Companies To Be Closed

With physical products, it's tricky, but understandable. I buy a pair of headphones made in the UK and have them shipped to me in the US. The taxes I pay are numerous, local, state, national, international. Is sales tax the responsibility of the buyer or the seller? It should be obvious, until you get into the topic of use tax. If I buy a car in Delaware, there is 0% sales tax, but Pennsylvania will want me to pay a use tax (that just happens to be exactly the same as PA sales tax). I leased a car in Virginia, and VA requires that you pre-pay the sales tax for the totality of the lease. But when I moved up to Pennsylvania, they charge sales tax incrementally on each lease payment. So, does VA owe me a refund on my sales tax for VA? or should I be exempt from the PA incremental taxes? Or is the leasing company responsible for figuring out just where the tax money from this sale/lease should go? (These are rhetorical, I've already dealt with all the tax issues described)

OK. So you figured out physical products. Now lets get down to software. If we go by 'Where your customer pays you", you end up in a situation like my lease tax situation. Let's say I want to sell you some software for your company. $100,000 is what it would cost to buy a 10 year license under normal conditions. In location A there is a 10% sales tax, in location B there is a 3% sales tax. I require initial purchase of the software to take place in location A, with installment payments over 10 years. First installment is $10,000 where you purchase the token in 10% sales tax location. Subsequent payments are 9 payments of $10,000k in later years, which just so happen to be in lower tax areas.

Did the purchase happen in the 3% tax location, or the 10% tax location?

Comment: Re:Key question (Score 3, Insightful) 108

by IndustrialComplex (#48148885) Attached to: Oracle Database Certifications Are No Longer Permanent

It doesn't work like that. You would still have your certification. But it would be the old certification. What Oracle will do is issue their new improved updated latest whizbang certification 2.0.

So you would have your DBA certification, and it would still be exactly what it always was, but you would not have the DBA 2.0 certification.

Comment: A useful spamblocking practice (Score 1) 265

by IndustrialComplex (#48140831) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Can't Google Block Spam In Gmail?

One of the biggest problems I faced with my old gmail account was that because I used it for everything, eventually everything was sending me emails. As it came from what looks like legitimate sources, gmail had a huge challenge sorting out the good from the bad. It did a great job, but eventually I had to consider that email compromised.

Initially I planned to setup my own mail server for my own domain and aggressively manage the spam, but the last time I did that was in 2000, and I was rustier than a garden gate. The amount of relearning and work I would have to do to set it up properly and securely was going to be more than I could handle. However, I stumbled upon a solution which works well for me:

I registered a domain, and let GOOGLE manage it for me. The only thing different to me is that my 'google' email uses my domain name. As it's my last name, I get the convient forms of Firstname@lastname.com for my personal email. But how does this solve the spam problem if google isn't already solving it for you? On it's own it doesn't, but I decided to take what works with google and add some quirks (and let's face it, google knows a lot more about hosting email servers than I do).

1. Use a non traditional extension. No .COM, .NET, .ORG. Spammers can catch 90% of all email addresses by bulk spamming incremental names. *@gmail.com is going to get spam no matter what, but *@obscuredomain.it is not likely worth the computational effort, even for a botnet.

2. Do NOT give out your primary email address. If you want to give ABCBusiness your email address, give them the address ABCBusiness@yourdomain.com. There is nothing to setup other than having unassigned email addresses redirect to a single mailbox. What does this do? Well, let's say you start getting spam. Take a look at the 'TO:' field and if it says plumberbob@yourdomain.com then you know it was Plumber Bob that was patient zero for your spam problem. Simply blacklist incoming mail sent to the plumberbob@yourdomain.com email address and your spam is GONE. Give a new email to Plumber Bob and tell him to be more careful with this one.

I've been using this system for over a year and there have been a total of 10-20 spam messages that google caught and sent directly to my spamfolder, and one annoying company that kept sending me advertisements until I blacklisted the email 'thenoisycompany@mydomain.com'. There was also a period of time when a bunch of spam messages came through a to address from the person I assume was the previous owner of the domain. Blaclisted that address and all was quiet again.

The basic premise is that I realized that my email address will eventually get compromised, but at least this way I can compartmentalize the damage.

Comment: Re:The $50,000 question... more energy out than in (Score 1) 315

by IndustrialComplex (#48096411) Attached to: Fusion Reactor Concept Could Be Cheaper Than Coal

I'd suggest starting at 50 million to start, once they meet certain milestones, then release 150 million. After that, you can define certain other milestones to release that extra billion or so.

Lack of funds can be a problem. However, a perception of excess or unlimited funds can be just as deadly to a project.

Comment: Re:I love Model Ms. I still have two of them. (Score 1) 304

by IndustrialComplex (#48093907) Attached to: The Greatest Keyboard Ever Made

I hate to say I had a box of about a dozen of them that I sent off to a recycling center. They sat in that box for about 7 years before I got fed up with having them gather dust in my garage. I still feel a bit bad about it, but I didn't want to deal with the hassle of selling them in days when ebay was just getting started. Craigslist didn't exist back then as far as I know.

Comment: Re:Diplomatically risky, though possibly legal (Score 1) 335

by IndustrialComplex (#48093743) Attached to: US Says It Can Hack Foreign Servers Without Warrants

The US Constitution applies anywhere that the US Government is involved. The authority of the government to act is directly derived from the US Constitution. It doesn't matter if it is acting in in Iowa, Japan, or Jupiter, if the US government is doing something, the Constitution applies.

Comment: Re:So what they are saying... (Score 1) 335

by IndustrialComplex (#48093703) Attached to: US Says It Can Hack Foreign Servers Without Warrants

The US government is bound by the Constitution even you were discussing it's authority to perform an action in the next galaxy. As the US Constitution defines the powers granted to the government, any attempt to declare that the Constitution does not apply will also invalidate any authority that the government has as the authority is derived from the Constitution.

Also, don't confuse laws with rights. The laws of the US may or may not apply in certain conditions, but the Constitution ALWAYS applies if it is an action by the US Government.

Comment: Re:I can't quite decide (Score 2) 83

by IndustrialComplex (#48005025) Attached to: How the NSA Profits Off of Its Surveillance Technology

It IS public property. Just like the National Parks, or mineral rights under public land. Public property does not mean free. The government has a responsibility to manage public property in the way that best represents the interests of the owners of that property.

Licensing technology developed on the public dime seems like a rather responsible thing to do, just like negotiating for maximum compensation for oil on public land is the smart thing to do.

Comment: Re:You said something above... (Score 1) 106

No. He isn't a writer, so obviously he can't write regardless of authority. Come to think of it, given that statement how can any of this be true at all? Though I suppose this is all type and not really written at all. Or... is it even type? Oh god, everything I know is based on a lie.

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken

Working...