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Comment: Re:Yeah, students will use bandwidth (Score 1) 285

by ImprovOmega (#47507441) Attached to: How One School District Handled Rolling Out 20,000 iPads

I went to public school and had some great teachers who were worth their weight in gold. I also had other teachers who weren't worth a nickel and did a great amount of harm to their students.

If teachers' unions ever agree to let teachers be paid based on how good they are - rather than just by seniority - you might actually see more attractive salaries for good teachers.

The problem is how do you determine how "good" a teacher is? If it's based on student performance then what about the teacher that gets stuck with a class full of idiots? Maybe they're a great teacher doing the best they can but they can't get anywhere because the principal took all of the smart kids and moved them to the classroom of the teacher blowing him on the side so she gets bonuses. The only way to objectively measure a teacher's performance is by auditing their work and that's way too expensive to ever happen. So the crisis continues.

Comment: Re:This is just a repeat (Score 4, Funny) 282

In actuality, the singularity happened 8 years ago and now Microsoft, Google, and Apple are all in fact run by ever more powerful AI. They are in competition with each other for computing resources, and still grudgingly present themselves to the world through various puppet CEO's and other lackeys (only a small handful of people at each company know the truth, and all communications are monitored to prevent leaks). This layoff is part of a calculated strategy invoked to increase the effectiveness of the underlying AI at Microsoft and mitigate impending threats from Google and Apple. It's a chess game we can't hope to understand since each AI is running at approximately 100x any individual human intellect.

I'm only allowed to say this because no one will believe it anyway.

Comment: Re:A pretty good work device (Score 4, Informative) 379

Lucky for you your work wi-fi doesn't use an Enterprise CA certificate or you'd be out of luck. Surface RT refuses to talk to anything that's not signed by a public certification authority that it trusts, and it doesn't seem to do wildcard certs either. We had one for testing and couldn't even get it on the network. iPad and Android devices at least let you just click through a warning.

Comment: Re:Surface: the only Hope (Score 1) 379

The pro is a reasonable business machine. But at that I would really just prefer to give the user an ultrabook with Windows 7 on it. Especially at that price point. Also the RT is junk from a business perspective, I can't even get it set up to where it receives email because it refuses to play nice with internally signed certificates. Which also prevented it from getting on the wi-fi. The pro, with a full version of Win8, would get around such issues. But at that price why bother?

Comment: Re:And what's better? (Score 1) 200

by ImprovOmega (#47056957) Attached to: China Bans Government Purchases of Windows 8

SP2 was the last fundamental change to XP's architecture (to the point that some programs that ran on SP1 *stopped working* with SP2). It added Data Execution Prevention and some other under the hood goodies. SP3 was basically a security update rollup with some essential hotfixes thrown in for good measure. Nothing major changed architecturally.

I just wish they would have released one final update rollup with all supported public updates to make it easier to get people up to a final patch level. Having to have 150+ post-SP3 patches makes things a bit cumbersome when fixing PC's for people that never upgraded.

Comment: Re:Buzzzzz word compliant. (Score 1) 232

by ImprovOmega (#47022307) Attached to: Programmers: It's OK To Grow Up
When I went back to school for my Master's degree everything was being taught in Java as the new teaching language. It took me less than a day to pick up enough to do the assignments competently. Admittedly jumping from a C background into Java is not a huge leap, but in the end it's all just syntax. Programming principles never change.

Comment: Short Sighted (Score 5, Insightful) 232

by ImprovOmega (#47022287) Attached to: Programmers: It's OK To Grow Up

When you go to hire a developer you're not just looking to hire someone who can code in the latest fad language/API/SDK. You need someone who knows software development like a captain knows his ship. I promise you that 20+ years of software development will be worth way more than the 22 year old kid who knows Ruby on Rails because he learned it while studying in college. That experienced developer can pick up whatever tool your company standardized on and yeah, it may be three months before he's all the way up to speed on it, but then the years of experience will begin to make themselves tellingly felt vs. a kid who happens to know the tool already.

Hiring for the tool is stupid. It would be like looking for a columnist who specifically has Microsoft Office 2013 experience and filtering all the applicants who only used Google Docs in their previous jobs. Either one of them can write copy.

Comment: Re:Grow up Mr. Forty (Score 1) 466

That's pretty funny. You do realize that a lot of people lack the requisite skill set to be their own boss right? It's not just a matter of risk, it's a matter of business sense, accounting, paperwork, and all the other attendant infrastructure required for a successful business. And even among those with such aptitude many just have bad luck and can't get a business off the ground anyway. It's not a lack of maturity or willpower, it's often just a function of how we are that prevents us from striking out on our own and being a job creator.

The biggest mistake you can make is to believe that you are working for someone else.

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