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Submission + - Don't Begrudge Mozilla for Being a Commercial Open (

Thinkcloud writes: Do you hate the idea of anyone tracking your habits and usage patterns online? I'm convinced that most of us hate the idea, and even more convinced that users of Linux and open source platforms and applications hate it even more than the average user does. Efforts are ongoing to track your habits very closely, though, and that's why it's worth paying attention to the ongoing debate over Mozilla's stance on web privacy. Canonical COO and noted open source blogger Matt Asay has a good piece up on the topic at The Register, and The Wall Street Journal has been covering it as well. So far, Mozilla appears to have behaved

Submission + - Hacking In Evidence Prior To Most Breaches (

snydeq writes: "Professional hackers have little need to cover their tracks in advance to data breaches because most admins aren't even looking, writes InfoWorld's Roger Grimes. In fact, four out of every five data breaches leave a discernible trail of evidence prior to compromise — one that was neither noticed nor acted upon by IT. 'There are no silver bullets that will defeat all hackers. But it doesn't take some extraordinary rocket-scientist defender to defeat most hackers. It just takes good effort on the few defense items that are mostly likely to provide the best bang-for-the-buck defenses,' Grimes writes. Chief among these are monitoring logs and creating network traffic flow baselines. But the No. 1 way to prevent hacking is to stop end-users from accidentally executing Trojan horse programs, Grimes writes. No small feat given users' proclivity for falling prey to nearly every type of trap they encounter."

Submission + - Ad blocking is devastating to the sites you love (

An anonymous reader writes: Ars Technica recently conducted a 12 hour experiment in which story content was hidden from users of popular ad blocking tools. Explaining the experiment, Ken Fisher appealed to Ars' readership, 'My argument is simple: blocking ads can be devastating to the sites you love. I am not making an argument that blocking ads is a form of stealing, or is immoral, or unethical, or makes someone the son of the devil. It can result in people losing their jobs, it can result in less content on any given site, and it definitely can affect the quality of content. It can also put sites into a real advertising death spin. As ad revenues go down, many sites are lured into running advertising of a truly questionable nature. We've all seen it happen. I am very proud of the fact that we routinely talk to you guys in our feedback forum about the quality of our ads. I have proven over 12 years that we will fight on the behalf of readers whenever we can. Does that mean that there are the occasional intrusive ads, expanding this way and that? Yes, sometimes we have to accept those ads. But any of you reading this site for any significant period of time know that these are few and far between. We turn down offers every month for advertising like that out of respect for you guys. We simply ask that you return the favor and not block ads.'

Submission + - Open Letter to Mozilla Regarding Their Use of HTML (

AberBeta writes: We're on the verge of a serious evolution on the web. Right now, the common way to include video on the web is by use of Flash, a closed-source technology. The answer to this is the HTML5 video tag, which allows you to embed video into HTML pages without the use of Flash or any other non-HTML technology; combined with open video codecs, this could provide the perfect opportunity to further open up and standardise the web. Sadly, not even Mozilla itself really seems to understand what it is supposed to do with the video tag, and actually advocates the use of JavaScript to implement it. Kroc Camen, OSNews editor, is very involved in making/keeping the web open, and has written an open letter to Mozilla in which he urges them to not use JavaScript for HTML video. Coincidentally, this comes on the first day of the Open Video Conference, an event meant to espouse the virtues of using the video tag, which is hypocritically using Flash to live stream the event on their homepage!

The clothes have no emperor. -- C.A.R. Hoare, commenting on ADA.