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Comment Re:The basic question is answered...but still... (Score 1) 552

No, we're all too focused on "Who's fault is it?" and nobody has properly considered "What do we do about it?"

We know exactly what to do about it: move to less convenient fuels (excuse me, "renewables") , adopt less comfortable living conditions (aka "reduce energy consumption"), reduce the amount of disposable consumer goods in our lives, etc. And those of us in the developed world have to cut enough from our carbon budgets to make allowances for the populations of the developing nations who want to better their standards of living, a move that is guaranteed to build resentment on both sides of the equation.

What you're missing here (either honestly or deliberately) is that the problem is ongoing, and that because it's caused by economic activity, the people who are profiting from it want to continue to profit from it, and they are actively working to derail efforts to correct or even acknowledge the problem.

And those of us in the developed world are not too excited about fixing it. The benefit we get from fossil fueled energy is great and immediate; the impact we feel from CO2 emissions is so low we have to be 40 years old before we have enough experience to notice the impact on our own lives. Rising water levels on a few tropical islands is a long way from stepping on a gas pedal in North Dakota.

So yeah, we need to do both: stop the people who are encouraging the growth of the problem, and we have to accept some sacrifices as a result. Neither is fun, so ... you first.

Comment Re:The basic question is answered...but still... (Score 1) 552

Every single argument I've ever heard from the "deniers" is based on either a real lack of understanding of science, or they've assumed an argumentative position based on their political leanings. They don't understand the difference between weather and climate. They don't understand trends or statistical sampling. They don't understand the difference between tolerances and allowances, accuracy and precision, or how averages are computed. They don't understand how data from ice cores is calibrated and tested. They don't understand how geologic climate data works. They make faulty assumptions about CO2 data collection methods.

And you know what? That's OK. Not everyone can be expected to learn all that. But if they can't, then they at least need the honesty to either try to learn from people who do understand, or at least refrain from echoing arguments made by others - because those others aren't making those arguments out of pure stupidity. They are making them to advance their political agenda, or to at least delay someone else's agenda.

In any collection of people, there will be some "deniers" who will not listen to reason, meaning we will never see unanimity. The trick is recognizing when enough rational people have accepted the arguments. Once the percentage of "deniers" drops far enough below the population of rational people, it's time to stop trying to convince everyone and moving on to accomplish tasks. We have to know when the delays have run their course, because nothing will ever get done if we wait for every last denier to come into accordance.

As far as your argument goes, there are 50 years of science, 150 years of direct climate measurements, thousands of years of indirect climate measurements, and geological evidence going back much further. I think climate science is a lot further along than still trying to establish first principles.

Submission + - Push To Hack: Reverse engineering an IP camera (contextis.com)

tetraverse writes: For our most recent IoT adventure, we've examined an outdoor cloud security camera which like many devices of its generation a) has an associated mobile app b) is quick to setup and c) presents new security threats to your network.

Submission + - Patent troll VirnetX awarded $626M in damages from Apple (arstechnica.com)

Tackhead writes: Having won a $200M judgement against Microsoft in 2010, lost a $258M appeal against Cisco in 2013, and having beaten Apple for $368M in 2012, only to see the verdict overturned in 2014, patent troll VirnetX is back in the news, having been awarded $626M in damages arising from the 2012 Facetime patent infringement case against Apple.

Submission + - Stephen Elop Assumes Position In McMaster University

jones_supa writes: Technology maven Stephen Elop is coming home. McMaster University has officially announced that the former alumnus and Microsoft and Nokia executive has been named the distinguished engineering executive in residence at the school's faculty of engineering. It is an advisory position, where he will give insights into new research and teaching opportunities, as well as helping to translating academic knowledge to a wider audience. He will also give lectures twice a year, as well as sit on the dean's advisory council and act as an advisor to the dean. Elop is an alumnus of the McMaster Computer Engineering and Management Program, where he graduated in 1986. The faculty also awarded him with an honorary doctor of science degree in 2009.
Canada

A Legal Name Change Puts 'None of the Above' On Canadian Ballot (foxnews.com) 171

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it's a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC. One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party. Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north? Shouldn't every election have a line for "None of the above"? I can't wait until Little Bobby Tables hits 35.

Submission + - Candidate's legal name change puts 'none of the above' on ballot in Canada (foxnews.com)

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it’s a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC.

One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party.

Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north . . . ?

Submission + - Developers gather to help charities at massive virtual hack.summit() conference (hacksummit.org)

An anonymous reader writes: hack.summit (https://hacksummit.org) looks like a very interesting event — a pure virtual conference with a speaker roster that's surprisingly strong. The kicker is that it's all for charity to help coding non-profits. Lots of credible tech companies are behind it (Github, StackOverflow, IBM, etc). Part of the event is a global hackathon, where developers can hack over a weekend to help charities and win prizes.

Submission + - 18TB of Fraternal Order of Police data hacked (thecthulhu.com) 1

Dave_Minsky writes: Yesterday, someone by the name of Cthulhu released 18TB of sensitive data from the Fraternal Order of Police. The FOP is America's largest police union with more than 325,000 members in more than 2,100 lodges nationwide.

According to Cthulhu's website, the data were "submitted to me through a confidential source, and have asked me to distribute it in the public interest."

Submission + - How do I get Microsoft to get up off their asses & look at a Windows 10 prob (live.com) 4

mykepredko writes: My product communicates with a host system via Bluetooth (using the Serial Port Profile) and each time a device is connected to a PC a couple of serial ports are allocated. Windows has always had a problem with not automatically disposing of the allocated ports when the connection is removed, but until Windows 10, there were processes for deleting them. This isn't possible for Windows 10 (which apparently has new Serial/Com port and/or Bluetooth drivers) — but individuals, who are apparently working for Microsoft, periodically reply with useless suggestions or attempt to promote questions and ideas as solutions to the problem: http://answers.microsoft.com/e... I suspect that this is an issue for all Windows 10 users (although I guess few people are plugging/unplugging devices) — so how do we get Microsoft to take notice (and not have to pay for them to fix their bug)?

Comment Re:Assumes it ever lived (Score 2) 456

While I agree that emulating the parts of the iOS ecosystem that we all hate (the walled garden, and the over-dependence on for-rent services) was their biggest mistake, I just don't have the same loathing for Microsoft as I do for Apple. Apple innovated the walled garden model, and got millions of fanbois to promote it. Apple is like an abusive spouse, constantly telling their users they're too damn stupid to own anything as cool as their gear; and yet those people are grateful. Apple is straight up evil.

Microsoft just copied everything Apple did, stupidly hoping they'd stumble upon some magical formula for success. But it always seemed like somewhere deep inside Microsoft there was a tension caused by really talented people who knew the whole Apple idea was evil, and were trying to do the right thing. So I can't hate them as much.

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