Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Dumb author... (Score 1) 461

by I kan Spl (#46459285) Attached to: The $100,000 Device That Could Have Solved Missing Plane Mystery

The author failed to account for the increased cost required to launch more satellites...

"It transmits data via Iridium satellitesâSâ"âSwhich also allow people to use a satellite phone from anywhere in the worldâSâ"âSand can be programmed to start streaming flight data when a plane deviates from its flight plan, or instruments suggest something is going wrong."

I've looked into an Iridium sat phone for use while camping in the middle of nowhere. The thing is that their network is near or at capacity much of the time. Many times their phones can get signal but can't get a channel clear to make a call.

A quick google search says a cheap satellite is $300 million. I'm not sure how many we would need, but it would not be a small number.

Cellphones

Mozilla Labs Presents Seabird Concept Phone 61

Posted by Soulskill
from the does-it-print-money dept.
Several readers tipped news of a presentation on the Mozilla Labs blog about what they call Seabird, "a community-driven mobile phone concept." It's an imagining of what future phone tech could look like, using dual pico projectors and a Bluetooth/IR dongle to more easily interact with apps and web interfaces. "With mobile phone companies such as Samsung, LG and Motorola moving towards display applications for projectors, the technology remains open for expanding user interaction and input at the same time. The Seabird, on just a flat surface, enables netbook-quality interaction by working with the projector’s angular distortion to deliver interface, rather than content. With the benefit of a dock, each projector works independently and delivers laptop levels of efficiency."
The Almighty Buck

RIAA Paid $16M+ In Legal Fees To Collect $391K 387

Posted by kdawson
from the world's-smartest-executives dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "In a rare outburst of subjectivity, I commenced my blog post 'Ha ha ha ha ha' when reporting that, based upon the RIAA's disclosure form for 2008, it had paid its lawyers more than $16,000,000 to recover $391,000. If they were doing it to 'send a message,' the messages have been received loud & clear: (1) the big four record labels are managed by idiots; (2) the RIAA's law firms have as much compassion for their client as they do for the lawsuit victims; (3) suing end users, or alleged end users, is a losing game. I don't know why p2pnet.net begrudges the RIAA's boss his big compensation; he did a good job... for the lawyers."
Biotech

Part-Human, Part-Machine Transistor Devised 77

Posted by kdawson
from the mitochondria-look-up dept.
asukasoryu writes "Man and machine can now be linked more intimately than ever, according to a new article in the journal ACS Nano Letters. Scientists have embedded a nano-sized transistor inside a cell-like membrane and powered it using the cell's own fuel. To create the implanted circuit, the UC scientists combined a carbon nanotube transistor, lipid bilayer coating, ion pump, and ATP. The ion pump changes the electrical charge inside the cell, which then changes the electrical charge going through the transistor, which the scientists could measure and monitor."
Image

Oil Leak Could Be Stopped With a Nuke 799

Posted by samzenpus
from the lesser-of-two-disasters dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico could be stopped with an underground nuclear blast, a Russian newspaper reports. Komsomoloskaya Pravda, the best-selling Russian daily, reports that in Soviet times such leaks were plugged with controlled nuclear blasts underground. The idea is simple, KP writes: 'The underground explosion moves the rock, presses on it, and, in essence, squeezes the well's channel.' It's so simple, in fact, that the Soviet Union used this method five times to deal with petrocalamities, and it only didn't work once."

The person who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.

Working...