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Comment: Re:recover unused/abandoned IP blocks (Score 1) 460

by Hydroksyde (#30650386) Attached to: At Current Rates, Only a Few More Years' Worth of IPv4 Addresses

in this new world full connectivity is required not any more than a dedicated FedEx airplane from every city to every other city.

No.

You still need to be as "fully connected" as you'd ever be, with IPv6, or IPv4 with NAT. The connections STILL PHYSICALLY EXIST. The only difference is what kind of data is sent over those ports... there's no real reason for any scarcity, save for an arbitrary technical decision made in the early days of the TCP/IP Protocol

A better analogy would be, because humanity hypothetically ran out of unique postal addresses, everyone in the city shares the same address (name, address, everything), and the postman decides where to deliver the letter based on a the number of small cuts in the side. Wouldn't it make more sense to add more fields to the address, say, a ZIP code?

This is, in effect what IPv6 is doing. Adding more data to the address.

Comment: Re:IPv4.2 (Score 1) 460

by Hydroksyde (#30643784) Attached to: At Current Rates, Only a Few More Years' Worth of IPv4 Addresses
No. The address is stored in the header in binary 00010001 00110110 11110011 10101010 nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn is just a representation of this. An IPv6 Address it just a lot more binary 00010001 00110110 11110011 10101010 00010001 00110110 11110011 10101010 00010001 00110110 11110011 10101010 00010001 00110110 11110011 10101010
Linux

Installing Linux On Old Hardware? 507

Posted by Soulskill
from the where-are-those-old-telegraph-drivers dept.
cptdondo writes "I've got an old laptop that I've been trying to resurrect. It has a 486MHz CPU, 28 MB of RAM, a 720 MB HD, a 1.44MB floppy drive, and 640x480 VESA video. It does not have a CD drive, USB port, or a network port. It has PCMCIA, and I have a network card for that. My goal is to get a minimal GUI that lets me run a basic browser like Dillo and open a couple of xterms. I've spent the last few days trying to find a Linux distro that will work on that machine. I've done a lot of work on OpenWRT, so naturally I though that would work, but X appears to be broken in the recent builds — I can't get the keyboard to work. (OK, not surprising; OpenWRT is made to run on WiFi Access Point hardware which doesn't have a keyboard...) All of the 'mini' distros come as a live CD; useless on a machine without a CD-ROM. Ditto for the USB images. I'm also finding that the definition of a 'mini' distro has gotten to the point of 'It fits on a 3GB partition and needs 128 MB RAM to run.' Has Linux really become that bloated? Do we really need 2.2 GB of cruft to bring up a simple X session? Is there a distro that provides direct ext2 images instead of live CDs?"
Idle

Neanderthals "Had Sex" With Modern Man 536

Posted by samzenpus
from the strange-bedfellows dept.
According to Professor Svante Paabo, director of genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Neanderthals and modern humans had sex across the species barrier. The professor has been using DNA retrieved from fossils to piece together the entire Neanderthal genome, and plans on publishing his findings soon. He recently told a conference that he was sure the two species had had sex, but still had questions as to how "productive" the relations had been. "What I'm really interested in is, did we have children back then and did those children contribute to our variation today?" he said. "I'm sure that they had sex, but did it give offspring that contributed to us? We will be able to answer quite rigorously with the new [Neanderthal genome] sequence." What remains a mystery is what Paleolithic brewery provided the catalyst for these stone age hook-ups.
Biotech

Scientists Write Memories Directly Into Fly Brains 137

Posted by Soulskill
from the hellllllp-me dept.
TheClockworkSoul writes "Researchers at the University of Oxford have devised a way to write memories onto the brains of flies, revealing which brain cells are involved in making bad memories. The researchers said that in flies, just 12 brain cells were responsible for what is known as 'associative learning.' They modified these neurons by adding receptors for ATP, so that the cells activate in the presence of the chemical, but since ATP isn't usually found floating around a fly's brain, the flies generally behave just like any other fly. Most interestingly, however, is that the scientists then injected ATP into the flies' brains, in a form that was locked inside a light-sensitive chemical cage. When they shined a laser on the fly brains, the ATP was released, and the 'associative learning' cells were activated. The laser flash was paired with an odor, effectively giving the fly a memory of a bad experience with the odor that it never actually had, such that it then avoided the odor in later experiments. The researchers describe their findings in the journal Cell."

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