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Comment: Possible Malfunction (Score 1) 961

by HungryMonkey (#45586349) Attached to: Is the Porsche Carrera GT Too Dangerous?
The source is TMZ so take it for what it's worth, but:

"...possible evidence of a fluid burst and subsequent fluid trail before the skid marks at the accident scene."

The sources also made evident the absence of skids leading up to where the crash took place, with marks only noticeable before the point of impact. They claim if Roger had lost control of the vehicle there would be visible signs on the road from swerving rather than in a straight line, suggesting he didn't have control of the steering. "

Which would make all this talk of their skill and the dangers of that model moot in this situation. Perhaps we should wait for the final investigation report.

Comment: Re:What was "stop loss"? (Score 1) 668

by HungryMonkey (#43710889) Attached to: How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich
Ok, I get a little pissed off every time I hear this crap. Let me explain to you how enlisting in the military works: You enlist for 8 years. not 3, not 5, EIGHT. Generally, it's 4 active and 4 inactive. The inactive years, IE:reserves, are put there on the end of the active to allow the government to call you back or retain you if they need it. It's not a mystery. It's right there on the contract you sign. Stop Loss activates those inactive years because the military has deemed you currently irreplaceable.

Source: 5 years ACTIVE 3 inactive, USMC.

Comment: Re:Sounds handled fairly well (Score 2) 223

I figure that because it happened in the first place, which is completely inexcusable. What were they thinking?

The latest release from ESEA covers this. It was initially beta tested with client approval, then they decided against moving forward.

With the whole fervor around Bitcoin, we did conduct some internal tests with the Client on only two of our own, consenting administratorsâ(TM) accounts to see how the mining process worked and determine whether it was a feature that we might want to add in the future. We thought this might be an exciting new tool that we could provide to our community. Ultimately, we decided that it was not. On April 13, 2013, after the initial tests, ESEA informed those involved in the test that we were killing the project and they should stop using the beta test. It came to our attention last night, however, that an employee who was involved in the test has been using the test code for his own personal gain since April 13, 2013...

Piracy

+ - New study finds that music sales are not significantly affected by piracy.->

Submitted by HungryMonkey
HungryMonkey (1887382) writes "A report published by the European Commission Joint Research Centre claims that music web piracy does not harm legitimate sales.

Using clickstream data on a panel of more than 16,000 European consumers, we estimate the effects of illegal downloading and legal streaming on the legal purchases of digital music. Our results suggest that Internet users do not view illegal downloading as a substitute to legal digital music.

And in a big shocker, the IFPI claims the study is flawed.

IFPI believes the JRC study is flawed and misleading. The findings seem disconnected from commercial reality, are based on a limited view of the market and are contradicted by a large volume of alternative third party research that confirms the negative impact of piracy on the legitimate music business.

"

Link to Original Source

Comment: MPAA will fix this (Score 1) 334

by HungryMonkey (#41610449) Attached to: Study: Kids Under 3 Should Be Banned From Watching TV
Does this mean that the studios should be liable for all of the damage caused by tv shows and movies intended for children under 3? I mean sure, the parents could have prevented it, but they wouldn't have to if they weren't produced in the first place! And this line of logic is why the MPAA will never allow this to become a law, so it's pointless to debate how this would ever be regulated, or why anyone would think that the government should instruct us on how to raise our kids.

Comment: U-verse really can't compete (Score 4, Informative) 168

by HungryMonkey (#41517821) Attached to: The Fastest ISPs In the US
FTA:

Speaking of fiber, what about AT&T? The company did not make the top 15. In fact, the fiber-based AT&T U-verse service got an index of 7.9, putting it at number 22.

I'm really not surprised by this. One of the worst features of U-verse is that the tv and internet share the same bandwidth. After a little at home testing I found that my '18mbs' connection dropped by almost 6mbs per HD channel we were watching or recording. So while you pay for both, you can really only use one at a time. I promptly dropped their cable. The most frustrating fact is that we can't get Fios in my neighborhood. When we called to set it up while moving in the gentleman kindly informed me that if AT&T services my area Fios will not. Still trying to figure out how that is legal...

+ - Game Mechanics Applied to Prison Management ->

Submitted by HungryMonkey
HungryMonkey (1887382) writes "Seth Priebatsch, founder of mobile companies SCVNGR and LevelUp, attributes the success of Angola's latest warden to the application of game mechanics in a real life situation.

— On October 20 in a small town in Louisiana, there will be a rodeo, complete with the prerequisite boots, bulls and Marlboro-man doppelgangers. But this particular rodeo will take place not at a fairgrounds, but at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, also known as "Angola." The riders are untrained inmates who have earned the right to participate — and feel up to 6 seconds of freedom atop an angry bull — in a highly calculated and wildly effective prison reward system. Oh, we'll get back to that. First, though, I want to acquaint you with Burl Cain. He's the Angola warden that I'm fairly convinced moonlights as a savvy game designer. In 2004 Cain was charged with giving a makeover to America's largest and bloodiest maximum-security prison, home to 5,300 violent offenders.

Cain's play-by-play at Angola reads like a deck of game-mechanics cards. To change behavior, he introduced a progression system that was notched with "appointments" — challenges inmates had to conquer to in order to get a reward. Rise to the challenge and you could earn the right to own a pet, to take a job, even the freedom to roam the grounds. To reach the highest level, known at Angola as becoming a Trustee, can take up to 10 years. It's not an easy game, but it's one that the majority of its players are highly motivated to play.

At a certain point in the climb to Trustee status, inmates earn the opportunity to participate in the Angola Rodeo, held each spring and fall in an arena that holds more than 7,500. The day consists of 11 events, including bull riding.

"

Link to Original Source

Comment: You get what your paid for (Score 1) 684

by HungryMonkey (#39890221) Attached to: Growing Evidence of Football Causing Brain Damage

Yes, they are getting brain damage. No, this isn't really a surprise to anyone. But I have to ask, isn't this why they get paid the big bucks? No one is forcing them to play this game. A quick breakdown finds that your average NFL player makes 1848% what Average Joe does. And no, that's not a typo.

Average US salary: $41,673.83

Avergage NFL Salary: $1.9 million

Median NFL Salary: $770,000.00

Average NFL career: 3.5 years

In that 3.5 years the average NFL player, at MEDIAN salary, will earn $2.7 million or roughly the amount that Average Joe will pull in after 65 years. (160 years if the NFL player gets the average salary.) IMHO they are selling their health later in life for the riches now.

Science

+ - Florida University cuts CS department and increases its athletic department-> 1

Submitted by HungryMonkey
HungryMonkey (1887382) writes "In a move that highlights the priorities of the US college system,

The University of Florida announced this past week that it was dropping its computer science department, which will allow it to save about $1.7 million. ... Meanwhile, the athletic budget for the current year is $99 million, an increase of more than $2 million from last year. The increase alone would more than offset the savings supposedly gained by cutting computer science."

High schools have been doing this sort of thing for years but I wish I wasn't suprised to see this at the college levels."
Link to Original Source

+ - 12 more billionaires pledge to give away 50% of their wealth->

Submitted by HungryMonkey
HungryMonkey (1887382) writes "12 more billionairs have joined The Giving Pledge' , committing to give away at least 50% of their wealth, either within their lifetime or upon their deaths.

Twelve billionaires — with names like Ackman, Bronfman, and Musk — have added their names to the Giving Pledge, the campaign started by Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates in 2010 to spur philanthropy among the superrich. That brings the number of total members, many signing jointly with their spouses, to 81.

Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and George Lucas are listed as current members, but Steve Jobs had declined to participate. Note that this is merely a moral pledge, not a contract."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:So how come they are "smart" meters? (Score 1) 189

by HungryMonkey (#39623225) Attached to: FBI Says Smart Meter Hacks Are Likely To Spread

Smart meters do not use the old electro-mechanical method to measure power consumption. They are solid state and have no moving parts or coils that can be tampered with by a magnetic field.

Ok, so I actually RTFA and according to it:

The bureau also said another method of attacking the meters involves placing a strong magnet on the devices, which causes it to stop measuring usage, while still providing electricity to the customer.

That certainly sounds like tampering with a magnetics field. I'd hazard to say that there a multiple types of smart meters,

Comment: Re:Wonderful, but... (Score 1) 289

by HungryMonkey (#39618851) Attached to: How James Cameron Pumped Volume Into <em>Titanic</em>

What I want to know is, how much are they going to make on an $18m investment?

With the weekend numbers they are estimating that it's made over $25m already, you're probably right about it making a killing. And don't forget that after it gets out of the theater it will make a move for the home 3D market.

Nobody's gonna believe that computers are intelligent until they start coming in late and lying about it.

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