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Comment Re:Government keeps an eye on political organisati (Score 1) 112 112

Canadian here. Although part of the west I have to agree. Western establishment and media tends to trot out human rights groups they themselves fund and support when criticizing non-western countries... then flipflop on certain human rights they claim to support when those same human rights groups criticize them for violating them (e.g. Bush who clearly used torture should have seen trial for potential war crimes but is instead enjoying rounds of golf)

That said, human rights groups are not above criticism themselves. Who the f-ck made unelected NGOs the unquestionable priest class for what should and shouldn't be a right? A large chunk of "human rights" activism is just a front for leftist political ideology just like a fair chunk of it is just a smokescreen for nationalists and religious fanatics (e.g. the Holocaust industry, Islamophobia, US state department "human rights" reports that have the audacity to lecture about torture, or even my current government than claims to stand for "human rights'.. .then along with the NSA and GCHQ violates the right to privacy of billions of people )

The morons that complain about those that point out this hypocrisy in the west think that everyone that complains about are sympathetic to oppression elsewhere in the world. They can't understand the concept of principle or simply think they are above them. The way to spot a BS artist is to see if they follow their principles regardless of what nation they live in or economic policies they believe in... or whether they just point fingers at everyone else without looking in the mirror. Sophistry posing as ethics.

Comment blackmailing cheaters (Score 1) 173 173

Those that would blackmail cheaters of course should be treated as criminals as their motives are greed. However, if they happened to put that information all over the Internet I would applaud it. Cheating on a spouse isn't a crime but as close as you can get to one without actually being one. The emotional suffering, that can last for years, that unethical knuckleheads cause their spouses hurts their own children as well. People that are married and cheat not only deserve to be exposed but it's a moral imperative that they are exposed. .

Comment reporting comedy (Score 1) 288 288

It's hilarious when American news sources would accuse Kaspersky of spying for Russian government. Where where they when virtually all major US tech companies were spying on the entire planet on behalf of the NSA? It only took them Snowden handing them indisputable proof for these unprincipled "reporters" to notice.

Of course the lesson here isn't that America is all bad and Russia is all good. It's that lots of people that preach about ethics to others.... don't actually follow the very principles they claim to stand for.

Comment graphics intensive apps and senstive data (Score 1) 276 276

There is a place for pure web enabled apps and web client oriented hardware (e.g. Chromebooks) but desktop isn't going anywhere anytime soon. For the foreseeable future apps with high resolutions, mostly games, will have a place on the desktop. Streaming games have some market share but for high end demanding games (e.g. 3D shooters) response time will always be lower than what would be available locally. (or at least until we get terabit connections to our homes).. Sensitive for data will always have a place locally. Some people don't trust the net and never will. With governments having a free for all with our data one can hardly blame them. Any centralized hosted services is a target by terrorists who hate freedom... uhmmm...our own government officials.

Comment Re:Figures (Score 1) 105 105

The cowardly French companies are running away!

The interest question is where are the going to run to? With alleged free world leader america now violating the right to privacy on epic scale.. who isn't going to follow suit? Even fricken Canada is spying on everyone now. (part of five eyes). I'm old enough to remember when we used mock the Soviets as oppressive for doing this sort of thing. Now we are doing it. Instead of taking s strong stance against it, our own government is behavior like intelligence wing of the Comitern. And it isn't even a partisan thing. Most of the core figures of both Republican and Democratic party support this behavior. Apparently they not believe mass surveillance is "human rights". Thus the only way to end this behavior isn't waiting around for our megalomaniac politicians to stop it. The way to do it is to support private sector companies that produce technology that simply does not allow for backdoor. Politicians can pass the laws they want... but they cannot overrule the laws of mathematics.

Comment a new Greek (Score 0) 626 626

The only way a language will be used if it offers something the other languages don't offer. Esparanto failed because it really didn't offer much value over existing languages. In the modern era we learn English because English is the language of trade and culture. There is really nothing special about English other than self-reinforcing popularity but why change when we already have a language right? One of the few exceptions to this rule of popularity was the Greek language. During Hellenistic times, and well past it, people learned Greek because the language it had many concepts that other language simply didn't have words for. Greek only fell out of use in academic a couple of centuries ago because other languages adopted so many Greek words they didn't need Greek anymore (around 15 percent of English is actually Greek) So my suggestion for a useful language... a language optimized for scientific discourse just like Greek once was. The language should be far more coherent than current spoken language but not quite as precise as math. Get rid of annoyances like abuse of analogy. (everyone is analogized to Hitler as some point of their life). Get rid of duplicate words that mean same thing (like we don't have enough things to remember). Get rid of words like "much" and "largely" and "somewhat". Strict grammar and spelling rules with no exceptions (rather than i before e..sometimes). Make in mnemonic friendly and make it metric. (i.e. optimized for remembering and/or extrapolating meaning). Might even be a language one sings (since we know it can re-enforce memory) . If it was concise and useful enough that scientists started using it..., it would eventually trickle down to everyone else.

Comment Bring back firing squads, hangings and guillotine (Score 0) 1081 1081

Ways to kill people.

firing squads
hangings
beheading
water boarding (except this time drown them)
poison that leads to agonizing slow death
crucifixions
stakes through the anus
removal of entrails with a chainsaw.
etc..

The more gruesome the execution, the better. The problem with "clean" executions is that it makes those that self-righteously advocate execution as a form of punishment feel "civilized". There is nothing civilized about executions. its just another form of barbarism, murder and sadism but one simply sanctioned by the state. Lets stop pretending to be civilized and show ourselves as brutes that we are by making executions a bloodfest. Put on TV on Saturday morning for kids to watch. Their parents shouldn't mind. Many of them still claim it as 'justice" after all.

If humanity manages to survive our technology, there is little doubt future generations will see our generation as still with one foot in the door of savagery for having allowing capital punishment

Comment Those oppesed to homeopathy are close minded (Score 0) 447 447

I've even been yelled at several times for referencing homeopathic "cures" as quackery. Apparently I'm "closed minded" for expecting evidence that they work. In short, I don't think an infinite number of studies that indicate that homeopathy is essentially snake oil will put dent in the industry. The homeopathy industry isn't much different than the religion industry. Some people want to believe what they want to believe.

Comment Re:NOT TO BE TRUSTED (Score 0) 130 130

Human rights violations doesn't only apply to "executions and kidnapping of babies". Ultimately human rights is about rights. Do we have a right not to be spied on by our own government? According to the US Constitution the unambiguous answer is yes. It's unfortunate that some that claim to stand behind that Constitution.. that claim to stand for freedom.. .that claim to stand for human rights... grossly violate the right to privacy... thus should be shamed as HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSER Watch how vast politicians, who wish to be re-elected, start respecting people's right to privacy if enough constipates and NGOS start using the word HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE to describe mass surveillance. If we pansy around with our words..they'll just keep doing what they are doing.

Comment Re:NOT TO BE TRUSTED (Score 0) 130 130

With a theoretically absolute security and privacy (in terms of computing) we can certainly still trust our data to others. We could still provide personal information about ourselves to others. The point is it should all be based on voluntary interaction not others using backdoors to get to our personal data without our permission.

I'm not implying that everyone will abide by principles of security I describe. Companies will still produce close source software and hardware. Ignore security principles I'm describing. That is their right if they wish. However, their products should be labelled "NOT TO BE TRUSTED" because ultimately we have no way of knowing if they've put in backdoors. Transparency in product design is what creates security. This is why government now demand MS open up its source code. This is why the NSA doesn't run any binaries or firmware on its servers where it hasn't first looked at the source code. The NSA has security far better than our own precisely because its sticking to principles that we are not.

Comment Re:NOT TO BE TRUSTED (Score 0) 130 130

"Seriously? You're suggesting everyone trusts self-signed certificates as if they came from a CA that trades on their reputation for signing and delivering authentic security services?" You've misunderstood what I'm implying. Of course self-signed certificates are worthless by themselves but the current system of using centralized CAs is flawed because CA servers are being compromised. Security validation should be offloaded to P2P. This is not some fantastically unproven idea. Bitcoin blockchain functions off P2P security. With the right tweaking of SSL, CA's could be made redundant. Any system that depends on a centralized server... that can be compromised by an NSL... is inherently insecure architecture. NOT TO BE TRUSTED. With P2P and server side zero knowledge protocols NSL's largely become worthless pieces of paper.

Comment Re:NOT TO BE TRUSTED (Score 0) 130 130

Without absolute privacy we will have not have privacy. There is no in between state for security. We either have security or we don't. That's Bruce;s entire argument (and he's spot on). Of course average people people don't have the skills and resources like NSA and GCHQ but the technology for average Joe to snoop is out there too (if one is willing to hire a black hat)

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