Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 25% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY25". ×

Submission + - Phone Hackers Tied to Saudi, Pakistani Terrorists 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Four people have been arrested in the Philippines for allegedly hacking into AT&T customers' phones as part of a plan to funnel money to a Saudi-based terror group that helped finance a deadly 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India where 10 Pakistan-based gunmen laid siege to India's financial hub, killing 166 people. FBI spokeswoman Jenny Shearer says hackers targeted customers of AT&T making calls to expensive international premium-rate services. Police Senior Superintendent Gilbert Sosa says the Filipinos were being paid by a group originally run by Muhammad Zamir, a Pakistani arrested in Italy in 2007. Among the four people arrested was Paul Michael Kwan, previously arrested in 2007 (PDF) after the FBI began an international crackdown on groups suspected of financing militant activities. "Zamir's group, later tagged by the FBI to be the financial source of the terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, on November 26, 2008, is also the same group that paid Kwan's group of hackers in Manila," says Sosa. Philippine police say weak laws against cyber crime and poor technical capabilities had made the Philippines an attractive base for organised crime syndicates involved in cyber pornography, cyber sex dens, illegal gambling, credit card fraud and identity theft."

Submission + - Wikileaks to Sue Visa, MC Over Financial Blockade

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "CBS News reports that WikiLeaks intends to sue Visa and Mastercard for blocking donations to the service, an action it described as "an unlawful, U.S. influenced, financial blockade" in a complaint that argues that the payment firms have violated Articles 101 and 102 of the EU Treaty, which deals with competition among businesses and forbids the creation of anti-competitive cartels. “They’re boycotting Datacell and Wikileaks without any objective justification,” says Sveinn Andri Sveinsson, the Icelandic lawyer for WikiLeaks and DataCell, Wikileaks' credit card processing partner. “This is clearly an abuse of their market dominance.” Both Visa and MasterCard have claimed that payments to WikiLeaks and DataCell were suspended because they potentially violate the companies’ terms of service that prohibits “customers from directly or indirectly engaging in or facilitating any action that is illegal.” Danish payment processor Teller has already completed an investigation into WikiLeaks’ legality, and in January stated in a report to Visa that it could find no proof that WikiLeaks had broken any laws. In the meantime Wikileaks’ latest fundraising video takes a jab at Mastercard, spoofing Mastercards’ signature “Priceless” ads (video), as Wikileaks founder Julian Assange makes an appearance in the minute long video which tallies the group’s various expenses associated with running the website and defending it from attack and legal challenges. "Watching the world change as a result of your work: priceless. There are some people who don't like change," concludes the video. " For everyone else, Wikileaks.""

Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggy" until you can find a rock.