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Comment: Re:Corporations are not people (Score 1) 139

I agree that corporations need to be held accountable for their actions, but imagine what could happen if we do what you suggest.

Let's say it's your bank. Your ATM card, credit card, check book are now all useless. You can't pay your bills. You can't buy groceries.

Or maybe it's your power company. If they're not allowed to produce, your lights go out. All of the food in your refrigerator goes bad. You don't have heating/air conditioning. You may not have hot water to bathe in.

Or what if it was your employer? Some ass hole managers or salespeople that you may not have ever even met bribed someone, which you had nothing to do with. Now you don't get a pay check. Depending on how long it is, you may not have a job any more.

If you shut down a whole corporation, you punish everyone that does business with them (who may not have a real option of doing business with anyone else), and you punish all of their employees (whether they had anything to do with the crime or not).

I think it's better to punish the people who actually committed the crimes. And the people who knew about it but didn't do anything. And the people above them who reasonably should have known but were negligent in trying to stop or detect such things.

+ - Microsoft Downplays Threat of New Windows Zero-Day->

Submitted by Batblue
Batblue (1916684) writes "Microsoft downplayed the threat posed to Windows users by a recently-revealed vulnerability, saying that it was unlikely the bug could be exploited to compromise a computer.

"Based on our initial investigation this vulnerability cannot be leveraged for remote code execution (RCE) on 32-bit platforms," said Jerry Bryant, a general manager in the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC). "We are still investigating the possibility of code execution on 64-bit platforms, but so far have not found a likely scenario that would result in reliable code execution."

A successful attack that exploits the SMB bug would instead result in a "denial of service," said Bryant, using the term that describes a Window crash that would require rebooting the PC. Windows crashes often inform users of the dire situation with the infamous "Blue Screen of Death.""

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:90's OS (Score 1) 312

by Drizzt Do'Urden (#33638860) Attached to: Looking Back At OS X's Origins

Sorry, but you're wrong!

There was a kernel, it was called nuKernel. The boot ROM was used to launch the machine and provide the hardware information. You could replace the Finder with any other app and make the computer boot and work, but the System file was necessary for anything to function.

For the WaitNextEvent thing, what you describe is cooperative multitasking in an OS without memory protection.

Oh.. and DOS was an OS too...

Image

Man Builds His Own Subway 174

Posted by samzenpus
from the everyone-needs-a-hobby dept.
jerryjamesstone writes "Everybody is into rail these days; it is the greenest way to get around next to a bike. Leonid Mulyanchik has been into it for years since before the Berlin Wall fell, since before the first Macintosh, building his own private underground Metro railway system. English-Russia says that he has been doing it with his pension, that it is all legal and approved and that he is still at it. Gizmodo calls it 'Partly the traditional, inspiring, one man against all odds type of persistence, but more the obsessive, borderline insane persistence.'" Update: 06/02 07:33 GMT by T : And if you're the type to visit Burning Man, you can actually ride a home-made monorail this summer, too.

Comment: iPod storage ads (Score 2, Informative) 99

by anomaly (#29592531) Attached to: Verizon CTO Argues For Metered Pricing

iPod storage is advertised in terms of "song" and "movie" because normals don't know (or care) about bytes!

Apple sold their "inferior" device to zillions of people who don't care about how it's technically "less good" than other options, because they value things other than specifications - ease of use, style, etc. Those are valid selection criteria, even if *you* don't value them, obviously the market *does.*

Consumers on the whole will never understand nor care about "data". They will care about music and movies and other entertainment.

Remember "amuse" means
"a" - not
"muse" - think

We love our amusement.

Comment: Re:Oh boo hoo (Score 1) 281

by anomaly (#28812085) Attached to: The Rocky Road To Wind Power

Your post indicates that heavy object movement over roads is a solved issue. I respectfully disagree. It may be legal to carry heavy things on roads, but it's STUPID to do so.

Heavy trucks are the things that destroy the roads!

The weight and stresses aplied by cars are substantively less than those freight trucks. Of course, freight trucks pay more than you and I do in road use taxes, but not commensurate with the damage they do.

We need to fix the freight rail system to allow heavy things to transit via rail. This is what the rail beds were designed for (and our roads were not!) Unfortunately the rail system is mismanaged and @#$@#$#@ expensive!

Comment: As a devoted follower of Christ, this is scary (Score 1) 1376

by anomaly (#28762541) Attached to: Ireland Criminalizes Blasphemy

Free speech rights are important. I think that definition of hate crimes and speech limits are slippery slopes which can turn out to have consequences far different than the original intent. I found Penn Jillette's incessant blasphemy during his Las Vegas show offensive, but should not be criminalized.

I have a friend who recently visited Kazakhstan.He tells me that the growing influence of Islam there means that there will be a significant restriction of religious freedom there, and that Christians are very likely to soon be oppressed by those in power who oppose their religious beliefs.

As much as I value my religious beliefs and desire not to have them attacked, it is critical that freedom of expression be defended, even when it offends me. (Within certain limits - not yelling fire in a crowded theater, kiddie porn, etc.)

Comment: Re:AA/EO in the military (Score 1) 414

by anomaly (#28758947) Attached to: Early Abort of Ares I Rocket Would Kill Crew

I'm ignorant about the impact from a military perspective, but I can speak from a personal one. There were several large employers around my hometown. I applied for positions with them and was not offered a position with any of them. I spoke with a man who was employed with one of them, and he let me know that it was an "open secret" that only 30% of hires could be of a particular race (mine) due to affirmative action.

What did I do? Sue? Cry? Curse the darkness? No. I moved to where the number of employers was large enough that my skills were easily sold to the highest bidder. Thus launched my migration away from my family and into a pretty successful career.

Can I prove it was racial discrimination? Nope.

Do I believe that it was a factor in HR's decision? Yes.

Was it wrong to discriminate against me on the basis of skin color? Yes.

At the end of the day, unless you want to lose your mind, you need to accept that things are what they are and be like the internet "route around problems." There are consequences, but to live as a victim was not on the list of choices I found acceptable.

Just my 0.02

Anomaly

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