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Comment: Deregulation of the airline industry (Score 1) 473

by Honclfibr (#46218295) Attached to: Ugly Trends Threaten Aviation Industry

Deregulation of the airline industry occured in 1978 and the cost of commercial air travel has been plummeting (in inflation-adjusted dollars) ever since. The value proposition of owning and operating your own private aircraft vs travelling commercially has been swinging heavily in favor of commercial travel since that time. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that private aircraft ownership has been trending down since 1980.

Comment: But still crappy 1366x768 resolution screens (Score 5, Insightful) 513

by Honclfibr (#46025761) Attached to: HP Brings Back Windows 7 'By Popular Demand' As Buyers Shun Windows 8

This promotion actually made me go over and check HPs website out, only to be disappointed that the two laptops offered both had 1366x768 resolution screens. Come on HP. You outfit this Envy laptop with the latest i7 and 12GB of RAM, and then hobble it with such a lousy screen? I don't care what the operating system is, no sale.

Comment: Re:This is ONE EXAM, get a life (Score 1) 325

by Honclfibr (#46014663) Attached to: The Whole Story Behind Low AP CS Exam Stats

I disagree completely with the idea that people only take AP courses/tests for areas that are relevant to their major. In my experience, it's quite the opposite. I took one exam in high school: AP English. Passed with a 5 so I could skipd freshman english. Are I an english major? No, I are not, even though I spell really good and has good grammar. computer engineer. I took the AP English exam so I could skip freshman english. Me not need english for to engineer real good. So replace english with college class that is more good for engineer stuff.

I avoided AP calculus for exactly the same reason. Engineering involves a lot of math courses that build on freshman calculus, so I made sure to take freshman calculus so that I'd learn calculus as my school taught it.

Comment: Re:Hemingway Quote (Score 1) 393

by Honclfibr (#45589355) Attached to: IDC: PC Shipments Decline Worse Than Forecasted, No Recovery Expected

Stupid quote that doesn't apply. The reality is that no new PC hardware means no new PC sales.

Did IDC Predict that the newest GPUs would focus on energy efficiency, forsaking performance improvements; and it has been well over a year since Intel broke new performance ground? Even AMD hasn't released anything worth considering, unless your in the market for a budget pc, since the middle of last year.

You are conflating cause and effect here. The hardware manufacturers are focusing on energy efficiency and forsaking performance improvments *because* sales are down. They're trying to close the gap between traditional PCs and tablets, which people are buying in record numbers for their size and battery life. The way you close that gap is by improving energy efficiency.

Comment: Re:In all seriousness.. (Score 1) 397

If private organizations can't use drones to help with natural disasters, such as those in Colorado, how do you suppose this will get approved to fly near local airports and various cities and towns won't outlaw the flying of drones?

By money, of course. Same way everything gets approved.

Private organizations don't have Amazon money.

Comment: Re:Lots of little boards (Score 1) 130

by Honclfibr (#45039539) Attached to: Intel Launches 'Galileo,' an Arduino-Compatible Mini Computer

I like Linux on small devices like this, but I hate Busybox. Saving a couple of MB was a big deal back when you had 16MB of flash storage and that was it, but these days it's not unusual to have 16GB. Saving those few bytes on a version of Bash that barfs on a lot of common scripts is just dumb.

Then compile up bash and add it to your rootfs. That's what we do, for exactly the reasons you mentioned; I wanted to run more modern shell scripts andd busybox didn't support them. But that's ok, just because you start with busybox doesn't mean you have to stop there.

Comment: Re:Someone needs to tell the Linux distro creators (Score 1) 505

by Honclfibr (#41196825) Attached to: The True Challenges of Desktop Linux

And who would tell the distro creators this? Linus? I don't think so. If he did that, it would cease to be linux. Linux is, by definition of it's creator, open. You are free to do with it what you please. If that means fragmenting the community, so be it. Let them follow you, or not, as they see fit. Does it cause problems? Sure. But the alternative is telling people what they can or cannot do with the source code. And that would not be Linux.

Linux may or may not converge into less distributions. You are free to argue that it should, and others are free to follow as they see fit. But somehow restricting people from creating forks of the code would be going against everything that Linux was created for. There are plenty of walled garden OS's that can offer you a consistent experience. If you want that, choose one of those. Linux will continue to be relevant and useful to many long after you're gone, regardless of whether you find it's particular use model suitable to your tastes.

Comment: Re:Think of it as standardized assembly programmin (Score 1) 793

by Honclfibr (#40523311) Attached to: What's To Love About C?

Doesn't have to be that old. I wrote, and am still maintaining a program written for an MSP430 that fits into 13k (ok, 12.8k) of code, as it was a 16k part and 3k was used for the bootloader + vector table. It's running right now, controlling power supplies and running PID loops. Actually, it's running about 750,000 copies right now, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Which is why it had to fit into 16k. Every penny counts when you multiply times 3/4 million. And yes, of course it's in C. No worries about memory leaks though, there's no heap. I do worry about the 80 byte stack though, maybe it's time to bump it up to an even 128.

We are Microsoft. Unix is irrelevant. Openness is futile. Prepare to be assimilated.

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