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Comment: Re:Not THAT surprising. (Score 1) 305

by Hermel (#44080743) Attached to: Google Respins Its Hiring Process For World Class Employees

You should try code reading (not walkthrough): give the candidate 15 minutes on his own to browse the source code of a small library in an IDE of his choice. Afterwards, ask him what the library does and how. I've done this more than a hundred times with candidates and it turned out to be a very good indicator for how good they are as programmers. My brainteaser-question however turned out to be pretty useless.

Comment: Re:What about salting? (Score 2) 615

by Hermel (#36344916) Attached to: Cheap GPUs Rendering Strong Passwords Useless

> Is my five letter password more secure if the salt is 15 characters long?

No. The salt helps against dictionary attacks. Normally, it is different for every user, but not secret. It does not help against brute-force attacks.

What does help, is adding more rounds to your key-derivation function (e.g. PBKDF2). Or choosing a longer password.

Comment: Obvious Motive (Score 1) 132

by Hermel (#33023862) Attached to: Porn Sites Still Exposed In China

Imagine you are the Chinese secret service and trying to hunt down 'criminals' that try to circumvent the Great Firewall in pursuit of their 'criminal' activity. Sooner or later, you'll get frustrated because 99% of the leads you follow end up being porn downloads. By allowing porn, maintaining the Great Firewall becomes manageable again because the ones that you now detect circumventing it are now the ones you really care about.

Games

EVE Online PVP Tournament Streamed Live 101

Posted by Soulskill
from the enemy's-gate-is-down dept.
infinitevalence writes "Every few months the good Viking programmers of the north organize and present one of the most geeky e-sports out there. Thanks to them, for three weekends in a row we get to watch player-controlled spaceships fight it out for accolades and unique in-game items available only to the first, second, and third place winners. This year CCP has all of the content live online and streaming in HD for your viewing pleasure. So find a drink, whip up some snacks, watch the shiny explosions, and listen to the soothing words of player experts as they walk you through the action!"

Comment: Re:Great (Score 1) 214

by Hermel (#32456158) Attached to: Google Relents, Will Hand Over European Wi-Fi Data

I'm happy you didn't receive any mod points. Otherwise you would have voted up a completely ignorant post. Google collected much more than the SSID, it also collected transmitted data (see also the comment titled 'RTFA').

Actually, I just logged in in the hope of getting mod points to be able to downvote the ignorant comment and upvote 'RTFA'. But I didn't get any either.

Data Storage

+ - Short technical comparison Wuala and Amazon S3->

Submitted by haeferl13
haeferl13 (1790088) writes "Their is a short technical comparison between Wuala and Amazon S3 how they perform in upload/download statistics for a typical desktop environment. Amazon is faster in terms of upload time and bandwidth usage but not for download. Nevertheless a user won't recognize the difference and Wuala has a cool client which integrate perfectly in different OS. Something Amazon doesn't provide."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Notes from an ACTA information meeting (Score 5, Informative) 169

by Hermel (#30919494) Attached to: Unpacking the Secrets of ACTA

I went to an ACTA public information meeting that was organized by the Swiss delegation ten days ago. They couldn't openly talk about the positions of the different countries, but from what they said, I concluded that we don't have to fear as much as the internet rumors suggest. For example, they wouldn't sign the treaty if it contained a three-strikes-provision as this would be against Swiss law. They also publish quite some information on their website, including a transparency paper that roughly describes the content of ACTA:
https://www.ige.ch/en/legal-info/legal-areas/counterfeiting-piracy/acta.html

Overall, they made a good and competent impression and it also seems to me that they are open to input from the public. I'm quite proud that the Swiss government seems to handle this much more democratically and transparently than others.

Comment: I went to an ACTA Meeting this week (Score 1) 165

by Hermel (#30789028) Attached to: Adding Up the Explanations For ACTA's "Shameful Secret"

I went to an ACTA public information meeting this week that was organized by the Swiss delegation. They couldn't openly talk about the positions of the different countries, but from what they said, I concluded that we don't have to fear as much as the internet rumors suggest. For example, they wouldn't sign the treaty if it contained a three-strikes-provision as this would be against Swiss law. They also publish quite some information on their website, including a transparency paper that roughly describes the content of ACTA:
https://www.ige.ch/en/legal-info/legal-areas/counterfeiting-piracy/acta.html

Overall, they made a good and competent impression and it also seems to me that they are open to input from the public. I'm quite proud that the Swiss government seems to handle this much more democratically and transparently than others.

Comment: Hope? (Score 1) 674

by Hermel (#28244453) Attached to: Pirate Party Wins At Least One European Parliament Seat

Great news! I really hope the 18-30 year olds can still make a difference in an ageing society like Europe. I'm concerned that some decades ago, when the median age was much lower, western democracies were more agile and creative (look for example at the hippies, I'm not sure if that still wouldn't be possible).

Math

+ - Future of Financial Mathematics? 1

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a famous "Quant" has long been a strong critic of the use of mathematics and statistics in the financial markets. He has been very vocal in his books The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness. In his article on edge.org, he says "My outrage is aimed at the scientist-charlatan putting society at risk using statistical methods. This is similar to iatrogenics, the study of the doctor putting the patient at risk." After the recent financial crisis, wired.com ran an article titled "Recipe for Disaster: The Formula That Killed Wall Street" in which the quant David Li and his Gaussian Copula were crucified.

I recently got admitted to a reputed graduate program in Computational & Applied Mathematics. There is a wide range of subjects in which you can pursue your PhD, one of them being Financial Mathematics, in which I had a passing interest for quite some time. In the current scenario, how advisable it is to pursue a PhD in a topic as specialized as Financial Mathematics? What would my options be five years down the line? Will the so-called "quants" would still be wanted by the banks and other financial institutions or would they turn to more "non-math" approaches? Would I be better off in specializing in 'traditional' and less volatile areas of Applied Mathematics? In short, what is the future of Financial Mathematics in hindsight of the current financial crisis?"
The Courts

+ - The Pirate Bay Aftermath Circus in Swedish Press

Submitted by MaulerOfEmotards
MaulerOfEmotards (1284566) writes "Reading the Swedish news reports, the turmoil surrounding the aftermath of The Pirate Bay trial continues.

Part of the news are occupied with Tomas Norström, the presiding judge of The Pirate Bay trial. Mr. Nordström is suspected of bias after reports of affiliation with copyright protection organisations, for which he has been charged reported to the appeals court, is rapidly gaining a certain notoriety. The circus around him is currently focused on three points. First, his personal affiliation with at least four copyright protection organisations, a state the potential bias of which he himself fails to see and refuse to admit. Secondly, Swedish trials use a system of several lay assessors to supervise the presiding judge, one of which, a member of an artists' interest organisation, which is far fewer than Mr. Norström himself, was by Mr. Norström made to resign from the trial for potential bias, and his failing to see the obvious contradiction in this casts doubts on his suitability and competence. Thirdly, according to professor of judicial sociology Håkan Hydén the judge has inappropriately "duped and influenced the lay assessors" during the trial: "a judge that has decided that 'this is something we can't allow' has little problem finding legal arguments that are difficult for assisting lay assessors to counter".

The apparent grave legal problems if the trial itself is also of medial interest. Professor Hydén continues with enumerating "at least three strange things" with "a strange trial": Firstly that someone can be sentenced for being accessory to a crime for which there is no main culprit: "this assumes someone else having committed the crime, and no such individual exists here ... the system cannot charge the real culprits or it would collapse in its entirety". It is unprecedented in Swedish judicial history to sentence only an accessory. Secondly, that the accessories should pay the fine for a crime committed by the main culprits "which causes the law to contradict itself". And thirdly that accessories cannot be sentenced to harsher than the main culprit, which means that every downloader must be sentenced to a year's confinement. In closing Me. Hydén sums up by saying that to allow this kind of judgement the Swedish Parliament must first pass a bill making this kind of services illegal, which hasn't been done."

"If I do not want others to quote me, I do not speak." -- Phil Wayne

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