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Comment: Re:A few hundred extrasolar planets (Score 1) 80

by HermMunster (#47970241) Attached to: Astrophysicists Identify the Habitable Regions of the Entire Universe

They can only identify the known observable universe. However, it is unlikely that they have identified the habitable zone for the entire universe. It would be near impossible for them to identify the habitable zone for our galaxy. This is because we have no idea what is habitable because we only know about our life. Maybe that should say the like-human habitable zone of any given galaxy rather than the habitable zone of the universe.

Comment: Re:I never thought I'd say this... (Score 1) 353

You are absolutely correct. When the Scientologists wanted to get church status and hence tax exempt status, after years of trying they finally figured out that they needed to put their own people into the positions that would make the decision to grant them what they wanted.

The telecomm industry is the same. Wheeler is there to further the telecomm's agenda. No amount of upset or anger at the messenger will change that. Wheeler is there to push through the agenda of the telecomm industry. He was their top lobbyist in at least two of their top lobbying groups. He came from them and he will return to them when he is done fulfilling their agenda.

This is not paranoia. That's what his hiring was all about, even if it seems like the Whitehouse is seemingly (half heartedly) promoting net neutrality.

Comment: Re:I never thought I'd say this... (Score 1) 353

We all know that the telecomm and even to a certain extent the tech industry is very short-sighted. What I mean is that they predict things that only partially happen, that in reality the things that do happen happen well beyond what they expect.

Saying that 10mbs is the bare minimum for subsidies means 1) they are freaking still subsidizing the telecomm industry even though those companies are making record profits while providing some of the worst customer service and the lowest bandwidth rating of most of the literate world while charging us the highest prices nearly anywhere in the world, and 2) they should be talking 200mbs + because they have a history of being short-sighted. Give them an out for 10mbs and that's all we'll get because they went through this shit that forced it upon them.

Comment: Re:Hmmm (Score 1) 230

by HermMunster (#47821229) Attached to: Akamai Warns: Linux Systems Infiltrated and Controlled In a DDoS Botnet

Everyone is vulnerable when they aren't patched (and sometimes when they are). This particular warning only affects unpatched servers. I assume because servers, though they should be patched right away, they often aren't, because businesses (business managers) doesn't want to down the server for the patch. New technologies will allow patches even to the kernel without taking down the server. When that happens things like this will mostly disappear.

No, most reasonable people do not say that Linux is invulnerable, however, the Linux desktops and servers are far less vulnerable than almost all other operating systems.

Comment: Re:Well... (Score 1) 171

by HermMunster (#47777315) Attached to: Mozilla Rolls Out Sponsored Tiles To Firefox Nightly's New Tab Page

Turning it off is work. I install firefox on a lot of computers that come into my shop. I do a tremendous amount of configuration on all sorts of products. This is more tedium to turn it off. I'm sure this is the (developer') logic -- add too much tedium to configure that people give up and don't configure or keep the configuration hidden so people get tired of looking.

If I have to look, and search, and keep looking and keep up on the fact that this shit is being configured on by default, then it become pure tedium. There are so many programs and so many settings that just knowing that it has to be done, then doing it, for every machine, is too much tedium.

Comment: Re:This just in... (Score 4, Insightful) 140

Herein lies the kicker. Yep, Wheeler was placed there specifically for that purpose. It's an old Scientologist trick. They couldn't get the OK as far as their tax exempt status so they got their own people hired into those positions in order to make the decision in their favor. And, you know what? You can't do anything about it other than try to show proof that they did so with that intent, the intent to subvert the democratic process. It is a subversion of it but they know you can't do anything about it, so all they have to do is feign the desire to have the public concern heard even if they never intended to listen, and then make the decision in the ISP's favor. Wheeler, and his masters, knows that once the decision is made it will take Congress to counteract it. Then of course you have the President and the Vice President both of which favor the big corps that pay for this lobbying.

Comment: Re:Amen, brother Amen! (Score 1) 522

I send email to myself when I want a long term easily searched record of some random tidbit or web page.I don't read them unless I need them, that way a lot of them stay front and center if I choose to view unread mail.

It has also taken years to get rid of all sorts of extraneous email by having multiple mail accounts, ensuring I don't particpate in anything on the web unless they give an option to uncheck "send me email". If someone sends me email that I don't want I send back a message saying I don't want to receive any more. If I get more I mark them as spam. It has taken a long time to tame the inbox.

Comment: Do it enough times (Score 1) 149

by HermMunster (#46729581) Attached to: NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

If you know about it and have access to virtually unlimited resources you can afford to attach to your target and do it as many times as you want in order to get what you want.

And, frankly, I don't believe the guy that claims responsibility for the bug.

As well, if something this simple could cause such an issue then clearly it is an issue for lots of other important security programs.

Comment: Re:April Fools? (Score 5, Insightful) 274

Whether they are joking or not, regardless of their claims, the activity of the NSA is a violation of the constitution. It matters not what the FISA court says or what they believe it should be. It is a civil rights violation and they have been breaking the law. Without a warrant any collection of data is a violation of the 4th amendment. The purpose behind the 4th amendment was to stop general warrants, of which, the NSA activities qualify.

Slowly and surely the unix crept up on the Nintendo user ...

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