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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 1 declined, 2 accepted (3 total, 66.67% accepted)

+ - Romanian witches used Google to tell fortune->

Submitted by Hentes
Hentes (2461350) writes "The internet has made many things easier, but unfortunately this also includes crime: it seems that nowadays not even people wanting to know their future are safe from fraud. Two gipsy fortune tellers are being investigated, after the Romanian police uncovered that they have utilised some extraordinary help in their clairvoyant acts. The pair used information collected from internet search and social networks to gain the trust of their costumers, claiming that they could see their personal data through their crystal ball. In some cases, they also used high-tech surveillance techniques such as hidden cameras and phone tapping. But they didn't stop at merely spying on their victims: their most bizarre case involved a scuba diver dressed as a "Loch Ness monster".
The duo are suspected of fraud, illegal wiretapping, and also bribery of the prosecutor"

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+ - After strict laws reduce piracy, French music industry is still in decline->

Submitted by Hentes
Hentes (2461350) writes "France has one of the strictest anti-piracy law. After 17 months of operation, Hadopi released a report, claiming that illegal P2P downloads have been reduced significantly in the country: the studies they cite measured 43% and 66% decrease in copyright infringement. But that huge amount of "lost revenue" doesn't seem to show up in the French recording industry, as the overall recorded music market has decreased by 3.9% in 2011. Even more interesting is that digital music sales have skyrocketed in France. Could it be that it's not piracy killing the traditional recording industry but digital distribution?"
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+ - Giant single-celled organism found deep underwater->

Submitted by Hentes
Hentes (2461350) writes "Giant unicellular organisms were found deep in the Mariana Trench. The cells, about 10cm in size, were found at depths up to 10,641 meters. The organisms, called xenophyophores, only exist in deep sea and thus are very hard to study. The researchers of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography used untethered autonomous probes called 'dropcams' to capture images of the organisms."
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