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Comment: Re:We got in at a good time (Score 1) 527

by HeadSoft (#36547730) Attached to: Why Johnny Can't Code and How That Can Change

I agree wholeheartedly. Having the unique experience of learning to code in the 70s and 80s with simpler platforms, languages, and even expectations gave our generation of coders an enormous advantage. I daresay that we will probably be the most knowledgeable computer programmers in the history of mankind, because there will never be another Commodore PET/Vic-20/C64/etc. nor will BASIC and assembly language ever rise again... nor will any of us *have* to write software just to have software. There were many times I wrote my own applications or games out of necessity because the obscure platform I was using didn't have *any* software available to speak of... Timex Sinclair 1000, TRS-80 MC-10 and similar come to mind. We're living in much better times for computers, but much much worse times for programmers.

Still, it's kind of nice knowing we understand computers better than anyone else in the future of mankind ever will.

Comment: Not so unusual... (Score 1) 997

by HeadSoft (#34872880) Attached to: Are 10-11 Hour Programming Days Feasible?

Especially early in the days of my game development career, "crunch time" often came with MUCH longer than 10-hour days, often with no days off for weeks. I can't say we were always more productive toward the end of the day, but we (mostly) all managed and we knew plenty of others in the same boat. Still, there are always other jobs with better hours, and not getting burned out early in your career is a good idea too.

Comment: Re:But that's beside the point.. (Score 2) 304

by HeadSoft (#34831702) Attached to: Book Piracy — Less DRM, More Data

How many people run Linux and yet do not own or have relatively immediate access to a Windows box? I'm not making an argument about what should be; I'm talking about what is. I've derived great pleasure from owning a Kindle. If you're more interested in the politics of it, I support your choice to avoid DRM media - but it's not mine.

Quite a few Linux users do not have access to a Windows box, and prefer it that way.

Comment: Alternative products... (Score 1) 645

by HeadSoft (#34817566) Attached to: New Laser Makes Pirates Wish They Wore Eye-Patches

such as the Spyder III mentioned in a previous slashdot article, http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/10/06/14/1716209/Set-Free-Your-Inner-Jedi-Or-Pyro, ought to be a cost-effective way to achieve pretty much the same thing at a price low enough everyone on board could have one. Sure, it may lead to permanent blindness or small fires and wounds, but in a situation like this, it seems to carry more bang for the buck, and after all... they *are* pirates.

Comment: Re:Lets get the facts straight :-) (Score 1) 285

by HeadSoft (#34419676) Attached to: Judge Berates Prosecutors In Xbox Modding Trial

I seem to recall having met a few auto enthusiasts over the years who had made modifications to vehicles that rendered them no longer street legal, but the modifications weren't illegal nor was there intent to commit a crime, because they didn't drive the vehicles in the street afterwards (being used instead off-road, etc.) How is this case any different?

The Almighty Buck

Boy Finds £2.5M Gold Locket With Metal Detector 169

Posted by samzenpus
from the all-that-glitters dept.
Instead of bottle caps and ridicule from his peers, 3-year-old James Hyatt found a locket worth millions with his metal detector. James and his dad found the gold locket last May in Essex. Since then the 500-year-old treasure has been appraised at around £2.5million. From the article: "James’s father Jason, 34, said: ‘My son is one of the luckiest people ever. If we go to the doctors he’ll put his hand down the side of the sofa and pull out a tenner.’"
Earth

40 Million Year Old Primate Fossils Found In Asia 91

Posted by samzenpus
from the look-who's-coming-to-dinner dept.
sosaited writes "It has been widely believed that our ancestors originated out of Africa, but a paper published in Nature by Carnegie Museum of Natural History scientists puts this in doubt. The paper is based on the fossils of four primate species found in Asia which are 40 million years old, during which period Africa was thought to not have these species. The diversity and timing of the new anthropoids raises two scenarios. Anthropoids might simply have emerged in Africa much earlier than thought, and gone undiscovered by modern paleontologists. Or they could have crossed over from Asia, where evidence suggests that anthropoids lived 55 million years ago, flourishing and diversifying in the wide-open ecological niches of an anthropoid-free Africa."
Space

Collision of Two Asteroids Spotted For the First Time 31

Posted by timothy
from the delicious-space-dust dept.
sciencehabit writes "Astronomers report that a small asteroid located in the inner asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter took a major hit early last year. Previously rendered only in artists' conceptions, the first asteroid collision known in modern times revealed itself in a tail of debris streaming from what astronomers at first assumed was a comet. Instead of a steady stream of dust, however, they found boulders near the object with dust moving away from them."

Comment: 3d hype. (Score 1) 218

by HeadSoft (#33790744) Attached to: Toshiba To Launch No-Glasses 3D TV This Year

I don't get the hype lately for 3d that requires glasses, I seem to recall 3d movies being around since The Three Stooges, let alone Jaws 3d and the like. I know it's not exactly the same as modern movies, but how is it so very different? A 3d display that doesn't require glasses, that's finally something worth getting interested in.

Earth

Concrete That Purifies the Air 88

Posted by samzenpus
from the clean-roads dept.
fergus07 writes "Although much of the focus of pollution from automobiles centers on carbon emissions, there are other airborne nasties spewing from the tailpipes of fossil fuel-powered vehicles. These include nitrogen oxides (NOx). In the form of nitrogen dioxide it reacts with chemicals produced by sunlight to form nitric acid – a major constituent of acid rain – and also reacts with sunlight, leading to the formation of ozone and smog. Everyone is exposed to small amounts of nitrogen oxides in ambient air, but exposure to higher amounts, in areas of heavy traffic for example, can damage respiratory airways. Testing has shown that surfacing roads with air purifying concrete could make a big contribution to local air purity by reducing the concentration of nitrogen oxides by 25 to 45 percent."

"Never give in. Never give in. Never. Never. Never." -- Winston Churchill

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