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Comment Re:Because we are distracted by "global warming" (Score 2, Insightful) 136

Sounds like a mindless anti-government screed.

Because we are distracted by "global warming"

Which is a real issue, despite your denial.

plastics and pollution of our bodies of water

Which are also real issues, mostly perpetrated by corporate slop and a refusal to pay for the externalities of their production.

hazardous chemical releases by our own government's negligence, and corruption of potable water supplies

Which was an accident by a contractor that further polluted a river already polluted by mining operations done haphazardly decades ago - mining that polluted heavily but the costs for which were pushed off on society at large.

Comment Everything in your life will be a governance gizmo (Score 4, Insightful) 145

I've been trying to keep my job skills fresh so I can keep up with the "next big thing". But I'll be damned if I can figure out what the hell IoT really is and why it's taking off. Yes, I know it's connecting things to the internet. But to what end?

It will allow Apple, Microsoft, Google, the US Government, and others to turn every device in your home into a governance/surveillance device. It won't just be your TV watching you a la 1984, it will be your thermostat, your keyboard, your couch, your bedside lamp, hell, not just your bed but your baby's crib and the baby's rattle.

That is why they are so keen on the "Internet of Things." What? You thought it was to benefit you? Really? Then I've got a bridge in Brooklyn I'd like to sell you.

Comment Re:Bullshit (Score 4, Insightful) 740

Su is not a broken concept; it's a long well-established fundamental of BSD Unix/Linux.

You're pretty much making an argument to tradition here. The correct thing to do would be to counter his claims:

what "su" is supposed to do is very unclear. On one hand it's supposed to open a new session and change a number of execution context parameters (`uid`, `gid`, `env`, ...), and on the other it's supposed to inherit a lot concepts from the originating session (`tty`, `cgroup`, `audit`, ...). Since this is so weakly defined it's a really weird mix&match of old and new paramters.

I would like more detail from him on why and how it's broken, and how his replacement is truly different from "su -" but since it doesn't appear to be mutually exclusive with the use of "su" or "su -", other than typical reactionary hate I don't see what the problem is.

Comment That would be penny wise and pound foolish (Score 5, Insightful) 382

If this is actually a credible report, then the U.S. government needs to stop funding the rebuilding/construction of areas that are CURRENTLY under sea level like New Orleans and the dikes and berms around it. No more federal funds of any kind for regions currently under water!

By that logic we should just write off large swathes of the Netherlands. Dykes and berms work just fine, and we have the engineering means to keep portions of land we consider valuable dry even if the waters rise 10 or 20 feet. New Orleans would fit in this category in my opinion. It is a unique part of American heritage and a cultural gem (one of not-so-many the US possesses), well worth the investment of Federal dollars to keep around.

Not to mention that it is by far less expensive to retain land by shoring up or building new dykes, than it is to reclaim land already submerged. Not as cheap as ditching it of course, but in places where it is worthwhile (New York City, Hoboken, New Orleans, Holland, and various other places) it is much smarter to keep existing places dry than leave them to be inundated and then realize our mistake later and either lose them forever, or pay even more to reclaim them.

Comment I live in San Jose if anyone wants some opinion (Score 2, Interesting) 258

I grew up here, I can explain why the city council is seeking this.

A few years back the city implemented huge cuts to it's police department in salary and benefits. Before the cuts, we had 1400 officers (not bad for a city of a million people) After the cuts our police has dropped as low as 700 officers.

With a reduction in the number of officers we have, bay area criminals have taken it as a "Vacancy" sign to do business here. Every type of crime has shot up. Violent crimes, we're a magnet for package theft, prostitution runs rampant, with one spot having as many as 50 girls walking one particular street corner, and car theft.

San Jose just voted to restore some of the pay last week, but it still won't be anywhere near 2010 levels. Cops continue to leave.

So now San Jose is in a situation of having to make due with what they have. Cops won't even consider this place for a job any more. Since they can't get another 700 officers to replace the ones lost, they're leveraging technology to fill the gap. Myself, and many other residents welcome any effort to clean up the streets.

Comment Could someone ELI5 how Macbooks retain value? (Score 2) 435

There was a time I understood this during the PPC era of mac, but now that macs run on commodity, non specialized CISC based x86, I have no idea why they retain their value. A lot of PC makers are starting to make machines that look *almost* as nice as a MBP. My HP Envy Beats laptops have a nice aluminum case.

Comment Re:The death of common sense (Score 3, Insightful) 220

Having the student issue a written apology to the teacher and having him post a simple "obviously this was a joke" tweet seems like it should have handled the situation quite well and made it a learning experience for the student. Engaging the parents early would help ensure it's taken seriously and reinforced at home. No damage done, no lawsuits, no absurdly ignorant police chiefs.

Comment A tough area (Score 0) 220

Based on the facts presented thus far, I don't really see that the school district has a leg to stand on and that police chief needs to head back to night school to brush up on some law basics. Now that teacher; she may have had cause for some sort of civil action against the student, especially if the school did any sort of investigation of her based on the content of the exchange.

If the school wanted to take action here, they should have provided the teacher with lawyers and legal options upon request. If the tweets caused some sort of disruption on their own (frankly, the school district's actions caused more disruption than anything else), only then should they have acted based on the results of an investigation. Here they just seemed to have been lurching about without any sort of plan or clue for how to proceed properly and objectively.

Comment Wonderful DRM misfeatures (Score 4, Interesting) 134

When I can buy ebooks without respect to region, I'll hop on board. But as it stands, I can't buy books published outside my home country, and as we've seen in the past, if you take your ebooks outside the country and your reader goes on line (particularly the Kindle) it'll lock you out of your books.

On top of that, the ebooks cost more than the paperback.

Get back to me when obvious negatives aren't being piled on to ebooks.

Comment Internet of Things = Shit I Won't Buy (Score 3, Insightful) 57

I have no interest in having a single device in my house, other than my TV, my PC, my laptop, my phone and my tablet, on the internet.

See? I already have half a dozen devices on the net, that cover all of my use cases and probably already represent a security hazard to my privacy despite my best efforts.

I don't need or want a Nest(tm) on the net that some hacker can use to turn off the heat and freeze my pipes while I'm away. The programmable thermostat I have already, with no network, is enough to set up reasonable settings for intra-day, overnight, vacation, etc. and it is secure by design. Ditto for my oven, my stove, my refrigerator, my lights, and every other fucking thing in my house.

Pretty soon a baby rattle will be networked and hackable, which will make it a surveillance, and therefor governance, device. Just the kind of world no one with an ounce of sense wants to live in.

So to those wanting to make the "Internet of Things", I would just like to say: I don't trust your security as far as I can throw it, and I won't be buying any of the malware-ridden, passively surveillant, buggy, vulnerable, finichky, and above all privacy-invading shit your selling. Move on to the next Rube, and may you meet an early and unpleasant demise.

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