Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:EA got too greedy (as usual) (Score 1, Insightful) 256

by Halo1 (#49278397) Attached to: SimCity's Empire Has Fallen and Skylines Is Picking Up the Pieces

Automatically getting your account blocked and all of your games disabled if you log in again after having been offline for a very long time (regardless of what the reason was) has nothing to do with paranoia.

Apart from that, I just think I should have full control over with whom I want to share when and what I play, without any major or minor inconveniences. Juggling Steam copies and whatnot should not be necessary. Seriously, I already paid for the games.

Comment: Re:EA got too greedy (as usual) (Score 5, Insightful) 256

by Halo1 (#49278151) Attached to: SimCity's Empire Has Fallen and Skylines Is Picking Up the Pieces

You can connect once, buy the game, put Steam in offline mode and never connect again.

At least if you never ever want to buy a game on Steam again. Otherwise, as soon as you connect again, it will automatically upload to Steam statistics regarding how much you've played the game, what "achievements" you've unlocked etc (even if you disable SteamPlay/auto-synchronisation).

And if you have bad luck, Steam will have blocked your account in the mean time because you haven't logged in for over a year and when the Steam application detects that, it will block all games you have locally because it no longer has valid cached credentials (you can't got back to offline mode). And then you can't play anymore until you've contacted support to have them unblock/reset your account. And yes, that happened to me.

It's true, you don't have to be online all the time. But you better be online either regularly or never again at all.

Comment: Re:Does this give us anything Raspberry Pi didn't (Score 1) 35

by Halo1 (#49028281) Attached to: Linaro Launches an Open-Source Spec For ARM SBCs

But is there really a point of having ARM64 on an ultra low cost system? Its not like you are gonna be using the increased bandwidth or large memory amounts that 64bits brings to the table on a sub $150 SoC, hell I seriously doubt the board will have enough bandwidth on its I/O to even saturate a 32bit pipeline.

I think the main point is to have a low-cost development board that people can use to port their software to AArch64 and/or test it on that platform (as said by the AC I originally replied to). I'm also sure that even with bandwidth limitations, the octocore will prove its worth when running our compiler test suite.

Additionally, the AArch64 instruction set has been redesigned from scratch and a lot of historical baggage and special cases have been thrown out (e.g. no more arbitrary changing the PC with half of the available instructions, and no more two different instruction sets with dynamic switching between them), so it wouldn't surprise me if over time AArch64 processors could actually become more power-efficient than regular ARM cores. Right now the AArch64 cores still include the ability to run regular ARM code too, but I'm pretty sure that over time this functionality as well as the entire regular ARM line will be dropped in favour of AArch64.

Comment: Re:Does this give us anything Raspberry Pi didn't (Score 4, Interesting) 35

by Halo1 (#49024327) Attached to: Linaro Launches an Open-Source Spec For ARM SBCs

This is the first low-cost aarch64 silicon on the market. There are piles of piles of developers that will get it just for porting their software for arm64

This. Just logged in because I wanted to say exactly the same. Until now, afaik the cheapest option was actually a jailbroken iPad Mini 2 (and you obviously can't run Linux on that).

Comment: Re:Pascal (Score 1) 648

by Halo1 (#48857041) Attached to: Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

It teaches good habits (but with the demise of Turbo Pascal I am unable to suggest a worthy compiler).

May I suggest the Free Pascal Compiler with Lazarus as IDE. There's even a Lazarus add-on to automatically configure it for pupils/beginners.

Disclaimer: I am and have been one of the FPC developers for the past 17.5 years (also starting originally with Turbo Pascal, and then moving on to FPC once it became clear Borland wouldn't come out with a 32 bit DOS version).

Comment: Re:To curb terrorism (Score 1) 219

by Halo1 (#48840215) Attached to: European Countries Seek Sweeping New Powers To Curb Terrorism

If you are convinced that part of the population has the destruction of a lot of what you hold dear as their secret agenda

How it is a secret agenda? It seems pretty out in the open to me.

Well, I thought that in case of the moderate muslims it could be a secret agenda in your view. In any case, feel free to ignore the "secret" in that sentence.

Comment: Re:To curb terrorism (Score 1) 219

by Halo1 (#48839815) Attached to: European Countries Seek Sweeping New Powers To Curb Terrorism

And yet there large numbers of moderate muslims that do not feel at all obliged or even inclined to impose the sharia on the rest of the Western country they live in.

Are you sure?

About as sure as you can be from watching documentaries, listening to interviews, reading opinion pieces, talking to people etc.

Maybe they don't feel a need to do it by force, but that's not really the whole story, is it? That's far morally superior to those who do, but it's still going to be an unending source of conflict.

If you are convinced that part of the population has the destruction of a lot of what you hold dear as their secret agenda , then I don't see a possibility besides endless conflict either.

Comment: Re:To curb terrorism (Score 1) 219

by Halo1 (#48839705) Attached to: European Countries Seek Sweeping New Powers To Curb Terrorism

This is an inherent contradiction between Islam and western society, and it cannot be reconciled without either giving up on religious freedom, or throwing away the Quran. They're not allowed to edit it.

And yet there large numbers of moderate muslims that do not feel at all obliged or even inclined to impose the sharia on the rest of the Western country they live in. Maybe they're not real muslims in the eyes of fundamentalists, but why should we take the same view as fundamentalists in this regard while we reject them on all other points?

Comment: Re:2nd/3rd generation of immigrants are IMMIGRANTS (Score 2) 219

by Halo1 (#48838937) Attached to: European Countries Seek Sweeping New Powers To Curb Terrorism

America is a civil state.

The Americas were, for the most part, colonised by European immigrants that kicked the shit out of the people that already lived there. I really don't see how that's different than what happening now (or is about to happen) in Europe in the mind of many scared/aggressive people. And for the record: I don't hold current day Americans responsible for that, it's not like they got to choose what their forefathers did or did not do, although of historically/societally you do have some kind of responsibility (just like e.g. Belgium has one vis-a-vis its ex-colonies).

The European countries are ethnic states, have been for thousands of years, and their borders are almost literally written in blood.

Ethnic states? Our borders are indeed written in blood (then again, so are many in the Americas), but I doubt there are many "ethnic Belgians" in existence. Or have ever existed, other than one tribe in a distant past that was termed as "the bravest of all Gallic tribes" by Julius Caesar.

While Europe is exceedingly liberal and politically correct in general, it would be 'unwise' indeed, to mistake generosity and kindness for weakness.

The way many people are reacting, it seems they did find a quite weak spot though.

Comment: Re:2nd/3rd generation of immigrants are IMMIGRANTS (Score 4, Insightful) 219

by Halo1 (#48838747) Attached to: European Countries Seek Sweeping New Powers To Curb Terrorism

... are second and third-generation immigrants ...

France belongs to the French

Germany belongs to the Germans

Sweden belongs to the Swedes

Italy belongs to the Italians

In other words, they are the indigenous for their ancestors, for thousands of years, have settled in that place

And immigrants ? No matter if they are 2nd / 3rd / 4th or whatever generation, once they have decided to harm the indigenous they should be kicked out, immediately !

America belongs to...
Australia belongs to...

Ah, never mind.

Comment: Re:Come On (Score 1) 257

by Halo1 (#48827673) Attached to: Belgian Raid Kills 2, Said To Avert "Major Terrorist Attacks"

Boko Haram has stated openly they are an Islamic group and are trying to form an ISIS like African Caliphate . What more do you need to see the truth?

Have a look at http://www.cfr.org/nigeria/bok... . Yes, Boko Haram is a very violent and abhorrent group (or rather a set of groups) right now, but they weren't always like that. Their current actions also have little or nothing to do with Islam (a bit like how "spreading democracy" had little to do with the Iraq war). At the same time, the Nigerian "Joint Task Force" of Nigerian police, army and private security forces (primarily funded by oil companies) is regularly accused of "summary executions, use of excessive force, and widespread arrests of suspected extremists, many based on little or no evidence" (words of the US Department of State, not mine) in the Niger delta (where Boko Haram is active). The paragraph in which that sentence appears also sketches the situation after 2009 (when Boko Haram became violent) quite well.

The JTF has been active since 2003 though, and some people directly argue (albeit in a mess of many missing/broken links that make it hard to check several argued points) that they basically made Boko Haram into what it is today with the objective of being able to justify the use of excessive force against them.

I still have to read up more on it from different sources, but from what I've read until now it seems that really has very little to do with Islam. It's just the banner they use due to their origins, just like we in the West (not just the US) justify almost all of our actions with "helping democracy", "supporting human rights", "increasing free trade" etc, even when that banner doesn't cover the actions at all. In many cases, it's mainly a cultural reference to something that the people involved (on the "aggressor's" side) can identify with as "good" or that they can relate to.

Comment: Re:Support the developers! (Score 1) 91

by Halo1 (#48520671) Attached to: <em>Dragon Age: Inquisition</em> Reviewed and Benchmarked

At least one of us is. I basically gave up on AAA games after (a) DRM stuff got silly, and (b) several titles in a row had such serious bugs that they just weren't enjoyable to play, and often they were never fixed.

A couple of AAA games have been/will be released on day 1 via http://gog.com/ without DRM: Age of Wonders III, Divinty: Original Sin, The Witcher 2 and 3, Pillars of Eternity.

Good day to avoid cops. Crawl to work.

Working...