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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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+ - Are tethers the answer to the safety issues of follow-me drone technology? ->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "Camera-equipped follow-me drone technology is hitting the scene in spades, promising extreme sports enthusiasts and others amazing aerial shots. Imagine, your own dynamic tripod that follows you on command. But what about the safety issue of having follow-me drones crowding the ski slopes? The tethered Fotokite addresses these concerns while sidestepping FAA regulations."
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+ - Companies that use robots are creating jobs for people->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "While acknowledging that robots and automation have displaced some jobs for human workers, Robot economist Colin Lewis points out that many new jobs are also being created as a result. His advice for job seekers: "It’s better to be prepared than caught out. My advice to young people: now is a good time to join the robot sector.""
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+ - Survey says autonomous cars should prioritize their passengers lives over others->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "In a moral dilemma involving an autonomous car that has to decide between killing a child on the road, or its passenger, 64% of survey respondents said the car should kill the child. The Open Roboethics Research initiative explored the reasons why. Most respondents said that the car should always prioritize the passenger's safety over that of others, otherwise we wouldn't be able to trust the technology. What do you think?"
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+ - My (autonomous) Car, My Safety: Results from our Reader Poll->

Submitted by AJung Moon
AJung Moon (3635537) writes "In a moral dilemma involving an autonomous car that has to decide between killing a child on the road, or its passenger, 64% said the car should kill the child. We explored the reasons why. Most of the responses say that the car should always prioritize the passenger's safety over that of others."
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+ - Jibo's Cynthia Breazeal on "Why social robots will change your life"->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "Take note, developers! In this thoughtful essay, Cynthia Breazeal — Founder and CEO of Jibo Inc, professor at MIT's Media Lab, and acknowledged pioneer behind the social robotics movement — argues for the urgent need to humanize personal technology in order to improve our ability to engage with it."
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+ - Reader poll: How would you like to interface with your autonomous car?->

Submitted by AJung Moon
AJung Moon (3635537) writes "We interact with gadgets and devices everyday. When it comes to interfacing with a device as exciting and complicated as an autonomous car, we will need to do so on many levels. We will want to set our destination, surely, or perhaps set a maximum speed. Or we might wish to be alerted if the car must pull into a gas station to refuel in the middle of a trip, or if we will soon be passing a rest area. How would you want to interface with an autonomous car? Let us know via a short poll."
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+ - An ethical dilemma: When robot cars must kill, who should pick the victim?->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "Driverless cars stand to reduce the number of driving fatalities overall, but there will still be fatal car crashes that are unavoidable. In this insightful essay, robot ethicist Jason Millar suggests that just because designers hold the technical abilities to engineer autonomous cars, it does not give them the authority to impose particular moral decisions on all users."
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+ - If a death by an autonomous car is unavoidable, who should die?->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "The Tunnel Problem: You are travelling along a single lane mountain road in an autonomous car that is approaching a narrow tunnel. You are the only passenger of the car. Just before entering the tunnel a child attempts to run across the road but trips in the center of the lane, effectively blocking the entrance to the tunnel. The car has only two options: continue straight, thereby hitting and killing the child, or swerve, thereby colliding into the wall on either side of the tunnel and killing you. What is the ethical choice? Who should make this decision?

Philosophers and stakeholders in autonomous cars have been seriously engaged in the ethics debate that comes out of these questions. Have your say in our reader poll."

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+ - Is 'tricking' judges in the Turing Test the same as AI?->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "From Colin Lewis: "Recent headlines have been awash with stories of a computer program ‘disguised’ as a 13 year old Ukrainian boy Eugene Goostman has passed the Turing Test. We will likely hear of more programs that have passed the Turing Test in the near future – how close these claims are to the real ‘spirit’ of the Turing Test is certainly very debatable.""
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+ - Robot selfies, and the road to self-recognition->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "What if, by taking a selfie, a robot could interpret its own gestures, and reflect and optimize its behavior? Or if it could study its selfie and learn to make its smile more credible? Could it gain 'self-awareness' by recognizing its own reflection in the mirror? Philosopher and business informatics expert Oliver Bendel looks at what it means for a robot to take a selfie."
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