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Microsoft

Ballmer Leaves Microsoft Board 140

Posted by Soulskill
from the retirement!-retirement!-retirement! dept.
jones_supa writes: After leaving his position as CEO of Microsoft a year ago, Steve Ballmer has still held a position as a member of the board of directors for the company. Now, he is leaving the board, explaining why in a letter to fresh Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. "I have become very busy," Ballmer explains. "I see a combination of Clippers, civic contribution, teaching and study taking up a lot of time." Despite his departure, the former-CEO is still invested in the company's success, and he spent most of the letter encouraging Nadella and giving advice. Nadella shot back a supportive, equally optimistic response, promising that Microsoft will thrive in "the mobile-first, cloud-first world."
Technology

Delaware Enacts Law Allowing Heirs To Access Digital Assets of Deceased 82

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the facebook-after-death dept.
An anonymous reader writes Ars reports: "Delaware has become the first state in the U.S .to enact a law that ensures families' rights to access the digital assets of loved ones during incapacitation or after death." In other states, the social media accounts and email of people who die also die with them since the companies hosting those accounts are not obligated to transfer access even to the heirs of the deceased. In Delaware, however, this is no longer the case. The article notes that even if the deceased was a resident of another state, if his/her will is governed by Delaware law, his/her heirs will be allowed to avail of the new law and gain access to all digital assets of the deceased.

Comment: Car bomb? Whatever... (Score 1) 238

There are kits that turn cars into remote controlled vehicles already. It would have already been possible. Meanwhile, self-driving cars still need someone in the seat and still require heavy modification to perform the task. It is not any more attainable with those than is already possible. Stop giving idiots ideas in news headlines, and stop pissing your pants every time there's new tech.
Earth

Fighting Invasive Fish With Forks and Knives 180

Posted by samzenpus
from the don't-forget-the-tartar dept.
An anonymous reader writes NPR commentator Bonny Wolf has a unique solution to battle the threat of invasive fish species in our waterways. She proposes we fight them with a knife, fork, and a few lemon wedges. From the article: "Take the northern snakehead, which has made its way into tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. It competes with native species for food, and then eats the native species, not to mention the odd frog or bird, with its mouthful of sharp teeth. It's been called "Fishzilla." It breeds fast, has no natural predators and can grow to be 4 feet long. The northern snakehead hangs out in grassy shallows, making it hard to catch. But a couple of years ago, Maryland started promoting the snakehead as an eating fish. Its harvest has increased from zero to 5,000 pounds a year."
Science

Chemists Build First "Buckyball" Made of Boron 39

Posted by samzenpus
from the brand-new-balls dept.
CelestialScience writes Researchers have built the first "buckyballs" composed entirely of boron. Unlike the original, carbon-based buckyballs, the boron molecules are not shaped like soccer balls, with tessellating pentagons and hexagons. Instead, they are molecular cages made up of hexagons, heptagons and triangles. As Lai-Sheng Wang of Brown University and colleagues report in the journal Nature Chemistry, each one contains 40 atoms, compared with carbon buckyballs which are made of 60. Boron is not the first element after carbon to get "buckyballed", but the boron balls may be the closest analogue to the carbon variety. Because of their reactivity, they could be useful for storing hydrogen.

Comment: Noticed this before (Score 1) 112

by HalAtWork (#47383131) Attached to: Android Leaks Location Data Via Wi-Fi
I've noticed this before but haven't been able to figure out how to delete it. I guess it has to do with the device searching for stored WiFi networks to establish a connection? Still annoying. According to the article, if you connect to hidden networks then you won't be able to get around this, unfortunately that's almost all the networks I connect to. Couldn't it just do a scan of nearby networks and look up the MAC address of the hidden networks, and, on a match, then try to establish a connection?

Comment: If it's the govts job to review code... (Score 1) 178

If it's the government's job to review code, why not use OSS and have control as well as peace of mind? If they have experts capable of reviewing/understanding code, then wouldn't it be more productive to be using OSS so they could make changes that benefit themselves? Or BSD so they could own the solution? Being forced to review code to make sure it's safe pretty much eliminates the benefit* of the closed source software anyway.

*The benefit being that someone else is supposedly reliably curating the code for you, and you pay for that service

Comment: Good thing we use less paper now (Score 2, Insightful) 69

by HalAtWork (#47238125) Attached to: Study: Deforestation Depletes Fish Stocks
Less reason to cut down trees. I still know some people at work who print emails before reading them though, what is wrong with these people? I try to be a good example and casually mention how I avoid using paper in various ways when describing my tasks to others as well as in meetings, but it doesn't seem to make an impression...

If a 6600 used paper tape instead of core memory, it would use up tape at about 30 miles/second. -- Grishman, Assembly Language Programming

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