Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Why indeed. (Score 1) 254

by HHacim (#33682938) Attached to: Copyright License Fees Drive Pandora Out of Canada

I love this guy: 'Why would you spend a lot of money trying to build a service in Canada when Canadians take so much without paying for it?'. I don't know Mr. Henderson, but Pandora is apparently willing to do so, so maybe you should ease off the royalties a bit and that way you will get some money for "your" music. Instead, without services like Pandora people have limited venues for listening to music and as you said they will just take the path of least resistance and get their music for free. Didn't you learn anything from the past decade's battle over digital music distribution.You aren't in a position to negotiate. People already have access to free music. The only thing you can do is provide them with a legal and more convenient alternative.

Comment: Re:NY Times can do it, can your paper do it? (Score 1) 488

by HHacim (#30802812) Attached to: NY Times To Charge For Online Content

I disagree with your notion that people will want to pay for other peoples opinions. This may have once been the case, but now the internet is awash with blogs and such that are almost exclusively other people's opinions. The way I see it it will only become more and more difficult for the NYT or any one else to convince readers that their columnists are so much "better" than the average blogger. The strength of the newspapers is that they can publish research intensive articles because their reporters are dedicated to this sort of thing. These sort of articles are what I enjoy reading in a paper. Problem is I think it is hard to convince people to read this sort of article rather than simply reading the summary from news aggregate (unless the reader has a very deep rooted interest in the subject).

Comment: Think of the Models. (Score 1) 512

by HHacim (#29509407) Attached to: French Deputies Moving Against Photoshopped Ads

Doctored photos are good for the health of models. If a photo can be doctored to look like it is of an anorexic model it would save the actual model a lot of trouble. I know I know, this will ultimately lead to the unemployment of thousand of girls who have no talent but that of regurgitating every ounce of there lunch and walking short distances. Oh well, all good things must come to an end.

Comment: Lego guns aren't new (Score 1) 193

by HHacim (#29345541) Attached to: How Hollywood Tie-Ins Saved Lego

"The article also mentions coming Lego Stores, a Lego board game, how Lego now allows sets with violence (like a gun for Indiana Jones) ..."

Um, Legos has had guns for years. They commonly appeared in there pirate themed sets. Heck, I probably wouldn't have played legos half as much as I did if it wasn't for the firearms.

The Internet

+ - SPAM: Internet's First Registered Domain Name Sold

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "Believe it or not, it wasn't iternet.com or dot.com that was purchased when the Internet was "born." Instead, it was the somewhat off-the-wall name of symbolics.com. The Symbolics company was the first to use an internet domain name to guide Internet viewers to its line of Lisp machines, which were single-user computers optimized to run the Lisp programming language. XF.com Investments, which is a Missouri-based Internet investments firm, has managed to secure the domain name from its original owner for an undisclosed sum and XF's CEO was quick to proclaim his excitement over the acquisition. It's hard to say why this domain name was the first purchased back on March 15, 1985, but for obvious reasons it holds a special place in history. There has been one original owner for nearly 25 years. Over that time, we've seen the Internet grow to the tune of 180,000,000+ registered domains, and thousands more are being added each and every day."
Link to Original Source
Networking

+ - twIP - an IP Stack in a Tweet->

Submitted by
Adam Dunkels
Adam Dunkels writes "Inspired by the Twitter-sized program that crashes Mac OS X, I just wrote a really, really rudimentary IP stack called twIP, small enough to fit in a Twitter tweet. Although twIP is very far away from a real IP stack, it can do the first task of any IP stack: respond to pings. The entire source code can be found in this 128 characters long tweet. For those who are interested in low-level network programming, a code walkthrough with instructions on how to run the code under FreeBSD is available here. The FAQ: Q: why? A: for fun."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:The C definition, same token on both sides. (Score 1) 252

by HHacim (#28672513) Attached to: Judge Invalidates Software Patent, Citing Bilski

Would the same principle apply then to electronic hardware? Transistor radios, Xeon processors, flat screen TV sets? They're just taking voltages of certain characteristics and transforming them into voltages with other characteristics. Sure, we hook up the transistor radio to a speaker, but that's not the core of the patented design.

yes but that wouldn't be math then but rather electricity. I think , then, being a physical device, would be classified as a machine and perfectly patentable. Math is an abstract formal system.Electrons are quite concrete.

User Journal

Journal: "intellectual property" name alternative

Journal by HHacim
I hereby propose that the phrase intellectual property should be dropped. As others have pointed out, information really shares very few common properties with actual property. Therefore it should be called what it really is witch is tradmark, copyright, and patent. This can be abbreviated to TCP, which as you see , is in style with the just obsoleted aforementioned phrase. I realize it will take time for everyone to catch on, so until everyones on the same page, it would be helpful if the enl

Comment: Windows dosn't 'just work' (Score 1) 1365

by HHacim (#28001345) Attached to: Why Linux Is Not Yet Ready For the Desktop
Where does this assumption , Windows Just Works, come from? I switch to linux because Linux Just Works. I was tired of unexplainable crash, lack of useful tools (such as gcc,bash etc.), insane slow downs caused by malware and resource leach cause by anti-malware. Yes linux has problems, more hardware support would be nice, but remember, hardware support is not something that M$ engineers built into windows, it comes from 3rd parties. It takes time to build a user base and market share that will convince hardware venders to release drives/specs/code for their products. That being said Linux still supports far more hardware then windows. Somethings stated in that article aren't even desirable or available on windows: A cross the board GUI configuration. Windows doesn't have this.A lot of stuff must be done in the windows registery etc. Could you imagine the size of this GUI would be, what with all the features and options of a text file or cmdline program. What is unfortunate about Windows is the lack of alternative.In ,say Ubuntu, I can configure the network in a GUI or drop to a console and enter a few lines in a text file or enter a few commands to accomplish the same. This is exactly what I find so intriguing about Linux. I'm not going to try explain all the problems I had with windows and all the benefits I found with linux.

Thufir's a Harkonnen now.

Working...