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Comment: Re:For those of us looking to buy a 3D printer (Score 2) 213

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#41519445) Attached to: The Explosive Growth of 3D Printing

Did you happen to see the Formlabs Form 1 printer? They were at Maker Faire too. They're running a Kickstarter right now, and from the photos and video on there the parts that machine produces look far better than most anything else I've seen. I watched the video of the Tinkerines Ditto on IndieGoGo and the parts didn't look anywhere near as finely-detailed.

I'm quite interested in learning more about the Form 1 and it would be great if someone had a first-hand experience from maker Faire (I'm in Seattle and couldn't attend).

Comment: Logitech Alert (Score 1) 508

Logitech has a system that I purchased for my home: Logitech Alert.

You didn't specify exactly what you meant by "cheap," but you can get a full six-camera system (the max # of cameras it will support) for around $1,000.

720p cameras, motion detection, video stored on SD cards in each camera and copied to your PC, remote access, email alerts... It's got pretty much everything.

The best part is how ridiculously easy it is to set up. The system uses your home's electrical wiring to communicate between the cameras and the base system, so you literally just plug everything in and you're up and running. I was shocked at how easy it was to set up.

Here's some sample video from the camera on my front porch (which, by the way, I exported from their software to YouTube in just one or two clicks).

Comment: Paul Moller - total crackpot (Score 1, Troll) 135

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#31385566) Attached to: Popular Science Frees Its 137-Year Archives
More specifically, search for Paul Moller.

July 1967

If you have the urge to make like a Martian, you may get your wish. This is the goal of Paul S. Moller, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, who wants to develop low-cost ($4,000 and up) flying saucers for personal transportation. After installing new engines in his first machine [PS, July '66], Moller recently made a series of successful test flights a few feet off the ground. With a second, eight-foot-diameter, single-engine craft, demonstrated a few weeks ago, he hopes to acheive real flying-saucer altitudes.

March 1987 (advertisement)

For the past three decades, Moller International has been studying VTOL aircraft from every angle, in an effort to engineer the first VTOL aircraft that is safe to operate, inexpensive to manufacture, and economical to maintain. This advanced technology has finally been developed and will soon be available, in the form of the two-passenger Merlin 200.

January 2005

Last August one of the longest-anticipated feats of flight since the moon landing took place in a grassy field in Davis, California. As a small crowd looked on, a red Batmobile-like vehicle shuddered, lurched, and rose a few feet into the air, its eight 50hp rotary engines screaming like hornets. After a few minutes, the craft settled into the ground.

The event might not have seemed like much—it could hardly even be called a flight—but it represented a milestone that inventor Paul Moller, a 67-year-old Canadian, had been promising journalists and investors for more than a decade.

Yeah, a little bit more than a decade, all right. What a crackpot.

Comment: New single & multi-player content in each rele (Score 1) 520

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#29149099) Attached to: Ask Blizzard About Starcraft2, Diablo III, WoW, or Battle.net

Unless they plan on adding extra multiplayer goodies to the subsequent "episode", then the real driver to buy anything after the first one would have to be a nice, solid single player-experience and plot-line.

From the official Starcraft II FAQ:

How will the expansion sets impact multiplayer gameplay?

The expansion sets will add new content to each race for use in multiplayer matches. This could include additions such as new units, abilities, and structures, along with new maps and Battle.net updates.

However, they are definitely not neglecting single-player. Here's the latest news on all the work they're putting into single-player, and here's a video with a glimpse of the campaign.

Comment: How will removing LAN encourage more sales? (Score 4, Interesting) 520

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#29147221) Attached to: Ask Blizzard About Starcraft2, Diablo III, WoW, or Battle.net
What actual hard data does Blizzard have that led them to make such an about-face on LAN from Starcraft to Starcraft II? The ability with the original Starcraft to create a "spawn copy" that allowed friends to play for free in a LAN game was (IMO) a big driver of sales. Why remove such a successful feature? In what universe does removing popular features from your product and pissing off a large base of your fans somehow result in more sales?
Television

Futurama Voices Could Be Recast 260

Posted by Soulskill
from the bite-my-shiny-metal-*** dept.
Svippy writes "According to reports surfacing on the Internet, Futurama may be recast. The animated series is due to return next year on Comedy Central, but may not be the same as we once knew it. 'As part of the announcement, the show's producers said stars including West, Sagal and DiMaggio had all signed on to return. Turns out that wasn't true. The stars had all expressed interest in returning. But with the budget for Futurama dramatically slashed, the salary offers came in well below what the thesps were asking.' Phil LaMarr posted 20th Century Fox's request for auditions on his Facebook page. However, some are skeptical about whether it's a real casting call or purely a stunt to reduce the salaries of the voice actors."

Comment: Re:You call that "plenty"!? (Score 1) 251

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#28544167) Attached to: In Defense of the Classic Controller

1) My list was not intended to be comprehensive, it was just off the top of my head in 30 seconds. Yes, there are plenty of great 2D games out there, and still coming out today.

2) I've been "seriously" gaming since the NES (and before I saved up for my NES I played plenty of Atari 2600), so I've certainly got plenty of perspective. I still disagree with the original commenter's claims that "they" "just stop[ped] making 2D games" and that "2D games are not taken seriously."

You feel free to go ahead and keep complaining about the death of 2D games. If you don't mind, I'll just keep playing and enjoying the new ones that continue to come out. Thanks!

Comment: 2D games "not taken seriously"? (Score 2, Informative) 251

by H0NGK0NGPH00EY (#28529831) Attached to: In Defense of the Classic Controller

Same thing with 2D sprite-based games. 3D comes along, and people at first thing Great! This 3D stuff is neat, now we can have 3D and 2D games. And good thing, because entire genres of games and styles of art are built around 2D graphics. There's no way people will just stop making 2D games. But the reality is that they do. After a while we only have 3D games after all, and 2D games are not taken seriously anymore.

Gotta disagree with you on the point of 2D vs. 3D games. Just off the top of my head...

I could go on and on, but the point is that there are still plenty of great 2D games being made in recent years. 2D games most certainly are "taken seriously" (whatever that means—I mean, we are talking about games here).

"If there isn't a population problem, why is the government putting cancer in the cigarettes?" -- the elder Steptoe, c. 1970

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